Webinar Archives

This webinar was presented by Morgan Gopnik of Environmental Policy Consulting. One of the most recent trends in ocean management has been the introduction of Marine Spatial Planning (MSP) to reconcile multiple human objectives, including economic growth and ecosystem protection, within the exclusive economic zone (EEZ). A very similar balancing act has been practiced for decades on U.S. public lands with varying degrees of success. A recently released book, From the Forest to the Sea: Public Lands Management and Marine Spatial Planning by Dr. Morgan Gopnik, shows that the complex and frequently contentious story of the U.S. National Forests can be instructive to ocean managers. Her analysis shows how land management approaches evolved over time and reveals the ambiguities and contradictions inherent in multiple-use management of any public space. This webinar will discuss how members of the ocean community might achieve their goals more effectively by learning from the experiences of their land-based counterparts. This webinar was co-sponsored by the EBM Tools Network.

Learn how the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary MPA is planning for climate-smart adaptation and how you might be able to use the same approach. Sara Hutto presented the results of a vulnerability assessment for species, habitats and ecosystem services in the North-central California region. Application of the vulnerability assessment, scenario planning, and the formation of a working group to develop adaptive management recommendations was also discussed. To learn more about how the assessment was conducted, please view the August 2014 webinar presentation, A Climate-Smart Approach to Adaptive Management of North-central California Coast and Ocean Resources. This webinar was co-sponsored by the NOAA National Marine Protected Areas Center, the EBM Tools Network, OpenChannels.org, and MPA News.

This webinar was presented by Jorge Brenner of The Nature Conservancy, Greg Guannel and Gregg Verutes of the Natural Capital Project, and Joey Bernhardt of the University of British Columbia. It was cosponsored by the EBM Tools Network. Blue Carbon is a term used to define carbon that is stored and sequestered in coastal wetland habitats. Wetland habitats found along the Gulf Coast of Texas include coastal salt marshes, fresh water marshes, swamps, seagrass beds, and mangroves. All of these habitats are capable of storing, or “sinking”, significant quantities of carbon in their plant matter and soils. The Nature Conservancy’s Texas Blue Carbon Analysis estimated the total amount of carbon stored in coastal wetlands along the coast of Texas. These estimates are based on three “pools” of carbon that are associated with terrestrial and wetland plant communities: 1) above ground biomass (plant material), 2) below ground biomass (roots), and 3) soils. The study site was a zone that extended 10 kilometers inland from the entire Texas coastline. Carbon modeling was done using the InVEST Terrestrial Carbon model (www.naturalcapitalproject.org/InVEST.html). The results of this analysis are designed to help prioritize conservation/restoration activities in wetlands in order to maximize the benefits they provide to all of society. Currently only about 28% of the coastal wetlands analyzed in this study are found within protected conservation and management areas.

This webinar was presented by Amy Polaczyk of Warren Pinnacle Consulting, and it was cosponsored by the EBM Tools Network. In 2013, the states of New York and Connecticut and the New England Interstate Water Pollution Control Commission funded the application of the Sea-Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM) to the entire coast of New York and Long Island Sound. Model simulations incorporated the most up-to-date wetland layers and hydro-enforced LiDAR-derived elevation data with an extensive tide range database and dynamic marsh accretion feedbacks based on mechanistic models of marsh and water quality characteristics. Simulations were run under four New York-specific scenarios of future sea level rise. Stochastic uncertainty analyses were completed, providing confidence intervals for projections, spatial maps showing likelihood of land conversions, and statistical indicators to characterize possible future outcomes and thus better assist decision making. This presentation will discuss the SLAMM application and results, with a focus on the results of the uncertainty analyses and their implications for identifying appropriate planning, management, and adaptation strategies. Learn more at www.warrenpinnacle.com.

This webinar was presented by by Elsa Haubold of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and it was cosponsored by NOAA National Marine Protected Areas Center, the EBM Tools Network, and MPA News. Conservation challenges of the 21st century are complex and include both local challenges and widespread threats such as drought, climate change, and large-scale habitat fragmentation. These complex threats impact entire landscapes and seascapes and multiple resources simultaneously and are too large for any single organization to meet alone. The Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCCs) provide a forum for States, Tribes, Federal agencies, non-governmental organizations, universities and other groups to work together in a new way. LCCs provide scientific and technical expertise for conservation planning at landscape scales and promote collaboration among their members in defining shared conservation goals. In this webinar, Dr. Elsa Haubold, National Coordinator for the Landscape Conservation Cooperative Network, will discuss the LCC Network's mission and objectives, the work of its partners, and how oceans are integrated into the LCC Network. Learn more about the LCC Network at http://lccnetwork.org.

Presented by Rod Fujita, Kendra Karr, and Willow Battista of Environmental Defense Fund. The Framework for Integrated Stock and Habitat Evaluation (FISHE) equips fishery managers with a low-cost and highly effective online resource to assess and sustainably manage their data-limited fishery. FISHE simplifies the intricate fishery assessment process by walking users through a structured step-by-step framework that combines multiple methods. This webinar will walk users through the FISHE framework and describe how EDF has worked in Belize to implement this data-limited approach. To try out FISHE yourself, please visit http://fishe.edf.org. This webinar was cosponsored by the EBM Tools Network.

Presented by Dawn Wright, Chief Scientist at Esri, and Jenny Lentz, Education Specialist at the Aquarium of the Pacific. The story map is a relatively new medium for sharing not only data, photos, videos, sounds, and maps, but for telling a specific and compelling story by way of that content. Story map apps provide the user with sophisticated cartographic functionality that does not require advanced training in cartography or GIS. Story maps are essentially web map applications built from web maps, which in turn are built from web-accessible data (including OGC WMS, WFS). Depending on the chosen complexity of a story map, it can be built in anywhere from a few minutes to a few days. With the beauty and utility of underlays such as the Esri Ocean Basemap, as well as a small tsunami of ocean content percolating up through a host of open data sites, there are powerful stories being told about coastal zone management, conservation, exploration and other forms of scientific field work. These stories are informing, educating, entertaining, and inspiring decision-makers on a wide variety of coastal issues. This presentation will take the audience on a small tour of a growing catalog of coastal and ocean story maps, many of which are accessible via MarineCadastre.gov and NOAA’s Digital Coast. It will also highlight the various resources available for building and deploying story maps, and discuss the utility of this medium for presenting, not just photos and videos, but more analytical results. Learn more about Story Maps at http://storymaps.esri.com. Webinar co-sponsored by the EBM Tools Network.

Presented by Lauren Wenzel, Acting Director of the NOAA National MPA Center; Dan Laffoley, Marine Vice Chair for IUCN's World Commission on Protected Areas; and, Alison Greenberg, Senior Manager for the Promise of Sydney at IUCN. This webinar focused oncoastal and marine recommendations and next steps from November's landmark global forum on world parks. Webinar co-sponsored by the NOAA National Marine Protected Areas Center, the EBM Tools Network, and MPA News.

Presented by Tim Wilkinson of the UNEP World Conservation Monitoring Center. The Blue Carbon Mapping Toolkit is a unique suit of tools developed by AGEDI, GRID-Arendal, and UNEP-WCMC to broadly assess the impact of development on coastal marine ecosystems and the associated blue carbon stocks in Abu Dhabi. The tool consists of three components; a web based application to add, edit and validate areas of habitat; a mobile application for use in the field; and a public-facing site that enables decision makers to quickly assess blue carbon stocks in their area of interest. This webinar will dive into how the toolkit works to provide an accurate, evolving map of blue carbon habitats. Learn more at http://bluecarbon.unep-wcmc.org. Webinar co-sponsored by the EBM Tools Network.

Presented by Jeremy Jackson of the Smithsonian Institution and the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. Dr. Jackson presented on the new report Status and Trends of Caribbean Coral Reefs: 1970-2012. The report is a result of a three-year joint effort of the International Coral Reef Initiative’s (ICRI) Global Coral Reef Monitoring Network (GCRMN), the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), and the United Nations Environmental Programme (UNEP). It is the most detailed and comprehensive study of its kind published to date and is the result of the work of nearly 200 experts over the course of three years. Average Caribbean coral cover declined by half but varies greatly among locations with some sites showing little or no decline. The principal drivers of reef degradation so far have been local impacts of overfishing and coastal development that are potentially reversible by local action. Banning destructive fishing and strengthening coastal zone management would increase resilience of Caribbean reefs to the inevitable future impacts of climate change. Download the report at www.iucn.org/knowledge/publications_doc/publications/?uPubsID=5035. Webinar cosponsored by the EBM Tools Network and the National MPA Center.

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