Welcome to OpenChannels, the community hub for sustainable ocean management and conservation

With the latest news, research, events, jobs, and more, OpenChannels makes it easy for you to stay informed on sustainable ocean management and conservation – including the practice of marine protected areas and ecosystem-based management. Over 80,000 ocean professionals used OpenChannels in the past year alone.

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Questions? We're here to help you help the oceans!

E-mail either Allie Brown, OCTO's Communications and Outreach Director, at allie [at] octogroup.org or Raye Evrard, Project Manager for OpenChannels at raye [at] octogroup.org

You may also find us on Twitter @OpenOCTO or Facebook @OpenOCTO 

Join us for a webinar on Defining and Using Evidence in Conservation Practice

Event Date: Wednesday, January 15, 1 pm US EST/10 am US PST/6 pm UTC

Presented by: Nick Salafsky of Foundations of Success

There is growing interest in evidence-based conservation, yet there are no widely accepted standard definitions of evidence, let alone guidance on how to use it in the context of conservation and natural resource management practice. In this talk, I will first draw on insights of evidence-based practice from different disciplines to define evidence as being “the relevant information used to assess one or more hypotheses related to a question of interest.” I then present a typology of different kinds of information, hypotheses, and evidence and show how these different types can be used in different steps of conservation practice. In particular, it is important to distinguish between specific evidence used to assess project hypotheses and generic evidence used to assess generic hypotheses. I next build on this typology to develop a decision tree to support practitioners in how to appropriately use available specific and generic evidence in a given conservation situation. Finally, I conclude with a discussion of how to better promote and enable evidence-based conservation in projects and across the discipline of conservation, including the development of different types of shared evidence libraries.

For more information and to register, click here!

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