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OpenChannels is the knowledge hub for the global community of practice on ocean planning, ecosystem-based management, and marine protected areas. With the latest news, literature, online events, grant opportunities, jobs, and more, OpenChannels makes it easy for you to stay informed. We’ve served over 90,000 professionals in the past two years.

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E-mail either Allie Brown, OCTO's Communications and Outreach Director, at allie [at] octogroup.org or Raye Evrard, Project Manager for OpenChannels at raye [at] octogroup.org

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Join us for a webinar on Not all those who wander are lost – Fishers communities’ responses to shifts in the distribution and abundance of fish resources

Date: Thursday, January 31, 11 am US EST/8 am US PST/4 pm UTC 

Presented by: Eva Papaioannou of the University of Dundee and Rebecca Selden of Rutgers University

Fish resources in the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast US are sensitive to the impacts of climate change, with marked shifts in species’ distribution already taking place. Fishing communities’ response strategies to change are frequently neglected within policy, compromising the effectiveness of management schemes. This presentation will describe: 1) how fishing communities in these regions are responding to changes in the abundance and distribution of major commercial species and 2) how key characteristics of the fisheries (e.g., species diversity, gear diversity, vessel mobility, quota and permitting systems, proximity to fishing grounds) and fishing communities shape their choice of response strategies (e.g., changes in fishing effort, port of landing, and target species). This presentation will draw from research on New England lobster fisheries and mid-Atlantic Bight trawl fisheries. Results from these types of studies are critical for the development of climate-ready fisheries management and community adaptation plans. 

For more information and to register, click here.

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