abrown's blog

Blogs
Posted on August 27, 2019 - 3:19pm, by abrown

This interview blog was transcribed from the OCTOPOD podcast episode here. Not all of the podcast episode has been presented in this transcript so please go give the episode a listen.

Tim Fitzgerald works in the oceans program of the Environmental Defense Fund. He works on sustainable seafood and conservation finance "and figuring out how to get big international organizations to work with us making fisheries more sustainable."

Blogs
Posted on July 17, 2019 - 4:24pm, by abrown

This interview blog was transcribed from the OCTOPOD podcast episode here. Not all of the podcast episode has been presented in this transcript so please go give the episode a listen.

Julie Kuchepatov is the Seafood Director at Fair Trade USA and we had the pleasure of talking with her about her path to this position and what her position entails. 

Blogs
Posted on June 20, 2019 - 11:56am, by abrown

by Freddy Arocha, PhD , Professor

The Oceanographic Institute of Venezuela, funding institution of the Universidad de Oriente in Cumaná, was created in 1958 and began activities in 1959. It is one of the oldest and most important center for oceanographic and marine science research, public service, and undergraduate and graduate training in the Caribbean, Latin America and the world. From the beginning, the Institute fostered relations with the main universities of the world, which allowed the arrival of researchers to reinforce the faculty with a view to conduct Graduate studies in Marine Sciences (Oceanography, Marine Biology and Fisheries). Notable regional and global scientists, such as Dr. Brian Luckhurst, Dr. Jeremy Jackson, Dr. Daniel Pauly, Dr. Fernando Cervigon, and Captain Jacques Y. Cousteau, taught and conducted research at the Oceanographic Institute. Many of the Marine Science students and scientists have conduct research with the aid of the oceanographic research vessels and shore-based laboratories.

Blogs
Posted on June 19, 2019 - 1:52pm, by abrown

June 17, 2019 – Spanish and French versions of the MPAConnect guide on the detection and identification of Stony Coral Tissue Loss Disease are now available on GCFI’s website.

There is growing concern among marine natural resource managers across the Caribbean about the spread of Stony Coral Tissue Loss Disease. This affects some of the slowest-growing and longest-lived reef-building corals, including the iconic brain corals, star corals and pillar corals. It spreads rapidly and causes high rates of mortality among affected corals. The disease is appearing in parts of the Caribbean and marine natural resource managers need to be on the alert for this very real, new threat.

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Posted on May 30, 2019 - 4:21pm, by abrown

By Alex Tellez

Most of us in the Puget Sound area are aware that the iconic Southern Resident Orcas and the food chain that supports them are exposed to toxic contaminants, habitat loss, hydropower dams, vessel strikes, noise pollution, ocean acidification, climate change, and overharvesting of Chinook salmon – their primary source of food. But there may be another threat lurking in our waters that is relatively unnoticed: invasive zooplankton.

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Posted on May 9, 2019 - 7:22am, by abrown

By Kelly Martin

Technology could be blamed for many of the environmental problems we face today. It’s no coincidence that unprecedented increases in greenhouse gases began around the time of the Industrial Revolution. So what role does technology now play in solving those problems?

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Posted on March 5, 2019 - 12:41pm, by abrown

By Ian Stanfield

Here are some words that you’ve probably heard: economic opportunity. The ability to take part in the global market is considered a benefit. We want job growth, we want opportunities to make money and better our living conditions. In this day and age, money makes the world go ‘round. So, what do you do if you’re locked out of the economic opportunities that most of us take for granted?

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Posted on February 26, 2019 - 3:55pm, by abrown

By TJ Kennedy

Back in December, Japan decided to resume commercial whaling. It was an extremely controversial decision, at least in terms of environmental protection and conservation. The International Whaling Commission (IWC), of which Japan was a member, has banned commercial whaling since 1986. But Japan has also withdrawn from the IWC, and is thus no longer bound by their requirements, at least when operating in Japanese waters.

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