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Posted on June 20, 2019 - 11:56am, by abrown

by Freddy Arocha, PhD , Professor

The Oceanographic Institute of Venezuela, funding institution of the Universidad de Oriente in Cumaná, was created in 1958 and began activities in 1959. It is one of the oldest and most important center for oceanographic and marine science research, public service, and undergraduate and graduate training in the Caribbean, Latin America and the world. From the beginning, the Institute fostered relations with the main universities of the world, which allowed the arrival of researchers to reinforce the faculty with a view to conduct Graduate studies in Marine Sciences (Oceanography, Marine Biology and Fisheries). Notable regional and global scientists, such as Dr. Brian Luckhurst, Dr. Jeremy Jackson, Dr. Daniel Pauly, Dr. Fernando Cervigon, and Captain Jacques Y. Cousteau, taught and conducted research at the Oceanographic Institute. Many of the Marine Science students and scientists have conduct research with the aid of the oceanographic research vessels and shore-based laboratories.

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Posted on June 19, 2019 - 4:18pm, by abrown

By Spencer Showalter

 

On a transatlantic flight this spring, I met a climate modeler at the back of the plane as we peered out of a tiny window to look at the ice breaking up over Hudson Bay, a phenomenon that NASA’s Earth Observatory says now happens two weeks earlier than it did in 1988.  We talked about our careers; he was a climate scientist looking to retire soon, having spent his entire career using data to model current and future impacts of climate change, and I was weeks away from my attaining my master’s degree in marine affairs and just starting my career, hoping to continue the fight against climate change on a wider political stage. Near the end of our conservation, he graciously told me, “We need more people like you. We did the science, but no one ever listened – your generation has to take up the fight.”

Blogs
Posted on June 19, 2019 - 1:52pm, by abrown

June 17, 2019 – Spanish and French versions of the MPAConnect guide on the detection and identification of Stony Coral Tissue Loss Disease are now available on GCFI’s website.

There is growing concern among marine natural resource managers across the Caribbean about the spread of Stony Coral Tissue Loss Disease. This affects some of the slowest-growing and longest-lived reef-building corals, including the iconic brain corals, star corals and pillar corals. It spreads rapidly and causes high rates of mortality among affected corals. The disease is appearing in parts of the Caribbean and marine natural resource managers need to be on the alert for this very real, new threat (1). 

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Posted on May 30, 2019 - 4:21pm, by abrown

By Alex Tellez

Most of us in the Puget Sound area are aware that the iconic Southern Resident Orcas and the food chain that supports them are exposed to toxic contaminants, habitat loss, hydropower dams, vessel strikes, noise pollution, ocean acidification, climate change, and overharvesting of Chinook salmon – their primary source of food. But there may be another threat lurking in our waters that is relatively unnoticed: invasive zooplankton.

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Posted on May 9, 2019 - 7:22am, by abrown

By Kelly Martin

Technology could be blamed for many of the environmental problems we face today. It’s no coincidence that unprecedented increases in greenhouse gases began around the time of the Industrial Revolution. So what role does technology now play in solving those problems? As it becomes an increasingly large part of our everyday lives, it’s no surprise that technology is also becoming a more central part of the way we try to solve some of our planet’s biggest environmental challenges.

Read the rest HERE

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Posted on March 5, 2019 - 12:41pm, by abrown

By Ian Stanfield

Here are some words that you’ve probably heard: economic opportunity. The ability to take part in the global market is considered a benefit. We want job growth, we want opportunities to make money and better our living conditions. In this day and age, money makes the world go ‘round. So, what do you do if you’re locked out of the economic opportunities that most of us take for granted?

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Posted on February 26, 2019 - 3:55pm, by abrown

By TJ Kennedy

Back in December, Japan decided to resume commercial whaling. It was an extremely controversial decision, at least in terms of environmental protection and conservation. The International Whaling Commission (IWC), of which Japan was a member, has banned commercial whaling since 1986. But Japan has also withdrawn from the IWC, and is thus no longer bound by their requirements, at least when operating in Japanese waters.

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Posted on February 15, 2019 - 11:55am, by abrown

By Angela Cruz

When you hear “fisherman,” what do you picture? I would expect you see an image of a burly man in a yellow raincoat, struggling on a hazardous sea. Men have been the face of the marine resource industry and discourse for decades, with the assumption that it is a strictly male sphere. Previously, reports stated that the global fishing industry was overwhelmingly dominated by men. However, this statistic has been turned on its head. Today, the World Bank acknowledges that when pre-harvest, post-harvest and subsistence activities are considered, the fishing industry is nearly 50% women. As Currents recognizes and discusses women in STEM, it’s equally important to include women that work in the fisheries industry and the biases they experience in that discussion as well. When we don’t understand women’s roles in fisheries, this can render them invisible in the industry. These biases and invisibility can lead to exclusion of women in fisheries management, even though they hold great stake in marine resources and are more vulnerable to environmental degradation than men. This can have negative repercussions both for management outcomes and for communities.

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Posted on February 15, 2019 - 11:54am, by abrown

By Kelly Martin

A little over a year ago, I went to a job interview that I was confident I was qualified for: my resume matched up almost perfectly with the “desired qualifications” listed in the job posting. However, right before I walked in to the interview, I had a moment of self-doubt and quickly pulled my long, blonde hair back into low bun. I had straightened my hair that morning to make it look more professional than my usual untidy waves did, but under the glare of the fluorescent lights of the waiting room I suddenly became self-conscious: I was concerned that this time I spent on my appearance would make me look too feminine, and therefore, I wouldn’t be taken seriously. But with skills and experience that certainly qualified me for the job, something as trivial as my appearance wouldn’t affect whether or not my interviewers thought I was qualified enough, right? Unfortunately, that’s not always the case: a 2016 study found that women with “feminine appearance” were perceived as less likely to be professional scientists.

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