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Posted on January 19, 2018 - 12:01pm, by raye

Via The Conversation

"Marine conservation efforts are increasingly focused on managing particular regions to prevent certain kinds of fishing, or to restore a certain habitat, within their boundaries – things like marine protected areas. So knowing how sharks move around the ocean and use different regions to eat, mate or give birth is particularly important."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on January 19, 2018 - 11:58am, by raye

 Via phys.org 

"An international team of researchers studying globally declining shark populations report today that they used carbon isotopes as biochemical markers in shark muscle tissue to identify where in the oceans the mobile predators have been feeding, in the hope that such analyses provide a useful tool for conservation. Details appear in the current issue of Nature Ecology & Evolution."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on January 19, 2018 - 11:11am, by raye
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Via Hakai Magazine

"The depressed mud crab is dealing with a lot right now. There’s climate change, pollution, and a real downer of a name. (Its scientific name, Eurypanopeus depressus, is no more cheery). But its greatest burden is probably the genital parasites. Yes, there’s a particular barnacle that latches onto depressed crab crotches, takes over the machinery therein, and co-opts it for its own reproduction. (And you thought herpes was bad.)"

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on January 19, 2018 - 11:04am, by raye
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Via Hakai Magazine

"With sea ice becoming scarce, some of Svalbard’s ringed seals have responded by hauling out on rocks and mudflats. The change of habit may be the result of sheer desperation, or it may be something they’ve learned from their new neighbors: harbor seals that have expanded north as the water has warmed."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on January 18, 2018 - 1:50pm, by raye
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Via Quartz

"The lack of big data infrastructure and better cooperation mechanisms are hindering governments from tackling illegal trawling, says UK-based independent think tank Overseas Development Institute. The problem is especially severe for African nations who have limited access to enforcement capabilities and where illegal fishing annually cheats governments billions of dollars in revenue."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on January 18, 2018 - 1:24pm, by abrown
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Via Forbes

"...as aggressive as it is on paper, the new plan faces an uphill climb before it results in actual leasing in many of the new areas it covers. First, lease sales off the coasts of Washington, Oregon, California, and the entire Northeast will be bitterly contested by those state governments. As several analyses have pointed out, even though OCS resources belong to the federal government, states have enormous leverage over key aspects of the development process."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on January 18, 2018 - 12:47pm, by raye
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Via The Marine Conservation Institute

"At the end of 2016, the US reached a high-water mark, protecting 26% of its sovereign waters in MPAs. More importantly, 23% of that figure is within strongly protected areas closed to commercial extraction and with no, or strictly limited, local and recreational extraction."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on January 18, 2018 - 9:23am, by nwehner

Via Oceans Deeply

"As scientists race to save coral reefs and tackle other crucial marine issues, access to expensive scientific journals has become a roadblock to sharing knowledge, especially for researchers in developing countries."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on January 17, 2018 - 10:49am, by raye
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Via TCPalm

"Some scientists predict there could be more plastic than fish in the ocean by 2050. A study released in 2015 by the 5 Gyres Institute, a nonprofit ocean advocacy group, estimated that the world ocean contains over five trillion pieces of garbage."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on January 17, 2018 - 10:45am, by raye
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Via Today Online

"The tanker, the Sanchi, was carrying 136,000 tons of highly flammable fuel oil when it crashed into a freighter on Jan 6. On Sunday, the Sanchi sank after a huge blast sent up a great plume of black smoke and set the surface of the water on fire, China Central Television said."

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