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Posted on March 19, 2018 - 9:53am, by raye
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Via Anthropocene

"Scientists have engineered bacteria to produce a key ingredient found in environmentally friendly sunscreens. The advance, reported in the journal ACS Synthetic Biology, could speed up the production of green sunscreens and make them more affordable."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on March 19, 2018 - 9:47am, by raye
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Via Anthropocene

"City life may suit the world’s largest octopus species, according to a new study from researchers in Seattle. The study is a rare look at how urbanization affects marine organisms. It suggests that the sea, too, has its synanthropes – wild species that live in, and even benefit from, human-dominated landscapes."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on March 16, 2018 - 11:04am, by raye

Via Phys.org

"Since then, much scientific research has focused on the presence of giant kelp and the range of biodiversity it supports. Many marine biologists think of the world's biggest alga as the keystone species of its ecosystem, not only in terms of its structure—a huge forestlike environment under the sea—but also in terms of its tremendous productivity in supplying food for the near-shore ecosystem."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on March 16, 2018 - 10:22am, by raye

Via Hakai Magazine

"Typically, one bite is all a shark takes to kill a sea otter. For a white shark looking for blubber-rich seals, a sea otter is just an unappetizing hairball. But to the otters, the sharks’ intentions are irrelevant—they still end up dead, or wounded and in need of rehabilitation."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on March 16, 2018 - 10:13am, by raye

Via The Guardian

"Water use rights and access vary by region across the country, though the water itself has always been a public resource for people to fish, paddle, wade and float in. Private landowners have long taken unsanctioned steps to keep the public out of waterways, as in the recent case of an Arizona man convicted of shooting at kayakers boating down a river that runs through his land."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on March 16, 2018 - 9:44am, by raye
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Via The Guardian

"Less popular species such as dab, hake, herring and mackerel should be Britons’ fish supper of choice in order to support the UK fishing industry and help the seas, a conservation charity has recommended."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on March 15, 2018 - 2:23pm, by raye
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Via Seahorse Magazine

"The steady accumulation of end-of-life vessels in coastal communities across the United States and Europe has sparked discussion around a variety of intertwined environmental and economic issues. Currently, the most common destination for these ageing craft is the landfill or worse: abandoned in backyards, boatyards or local waterways."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on March 15, 2018 - 10:29am, by raye

Via The Atlantic 

"Albright and her colleagues created a huge inflatable container that would rise from the ocean floor and trap 15,000 liters of seawater, “like submerging a bucket underwater and pulling it up,” she says. They then used a ring of air diffusers, much like those that send bubbles into aquarium tanks, to saturate the trapped water with carbon dioxide. This gas acidified the water, which Albright then pumped over a nearby patch of corals, simulating what these creatures will experience 100 years from now."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on March 15, 2018 - 10:18am, by raye
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Via Ars Technica

"The key issue in all of this is the density of water, which drives the cycling of the oceans. Given similar temperatures, salt water is more dense; given similar salt content, cold water will be more dense. These density differences are large enough that if you have a patch of warm, fresh water sitting on top of cold, salty water, the two bodies won't mix very efficiently. The water ends up layered, or stratified."

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