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Community Updates - External Link
Posted on March 5, 2018 - 11:21am, by raye

Via Hakai Magazine

"Around the world, zooplankton migrate up and down in the water column throughout the day in the planet’s largest synchronized movement of biomass. During the day, they sink into the dark to avoid predators, then surface during the night to feed on phytoplankton and bits of detritus. Zooplankton underpin marine food webs, which means inaccurate population estimates could affect Arctic ecosystem models."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on March 5, 2018 - 11:08am, by raye

Via The Columbus Dispatch 

"After the Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972 made it illegal to kill or harass sea lions, their ranks steadily grew — and grew, and grew. Now, according to recent estimates by the National Marine Fisheries Service, California sea lions number in the hundreds of thousands, making them comfortably within the range of what experts call the 'optimal sustainable population.'"

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on March 5, 2018 - 11:02am, by raye
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Via The Washington Post

"The Washington Legislature on Friday voted to phase out marine Atlantic salmon aquaculture, an industry that has operated for decades in the state but came under heavy criticism after tens of thousands of nonnative fish escaped into waterways last summer."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on March 5, 2018 - 10:41am, by raye

Via Ars Technica

"The world's first commercial floating offshore wind farm, called Hywind, started sending electricity to the grid last October. Since then, the six-turbine, 30MW installation has been working well. Really well. In fact, Hywind has had a 65-percent capacity factor over the last three months according to Statoil, the Norwegian mega-corporation that built the wind farm off the coast of Scotland."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on March 5, 2018 - 10:30am, by raye

Via The Atlantic 

"Misali sustained generations of Muslims; the octopus catch, in particular, kept them fed for centuries. But overfishing, climate change, and oil exploration began in recent years to threaten the ecosystem. The octopus population dropped dramatically. Government regulations did little to curb the problem. And so, some residents decided to try a different strategy: appealing to the community’s Islamic consciousness and using verses from the Quran to promote conservation."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on March 5, 2018 - 10:27am, by raye
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Via Ars Technica

"While experiments have found that fish lose the ability to properly respond to either scent or visual signals of prey or predators when pH drops, the fish in these experiments behaved normally as long as both scent and visual signals were there. And critically, since the algae and plants in these tanks grew faster with more CO2 in the water, grazing fish and shrimp also did well as a result."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on March 2, 2018 - 10:47am, by raye

Via Ohio State News

"This is the first study to compare the amount of ocean debris with the behavior of beachgoers and to calculate an economic benefit to cleaning up those beaches, said Tim Haab, a professor of agricultural, environmental and development economics at The Ohio State University."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on March 2, 2018 - 10:43am, by raye

Via The Straights Times

"Since 2016, a new species of mussel that could have come from as far away as the Americas has been spreading rapidly along Singapore's northern coast, clogging up nets in fish farms and displacing the Asian green mussel native to Singapore, as they compete with the local molluscs for space."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on March 2, 2018 - 10:18am, by raye
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Via Stanford News

"As a way of understanding which factors had the biggest impacts on Hawaii’s corals, a group of researchers from the collaborative Ocean Tipping Points project, co-led by Larry Crowder, the Edward Ricketts Provostial Professor of Marine Ecology and Conservation at Stanford’s Hopkins Marine Station and senior fellow at the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment, completed the first-ever comprehensive map of how both humans and natural events influence overall reef health. This new study was published March 1 in PLOS One."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on March 2, 2018 - 10:16am, by raye

Via Live Science

"Discovered on an expedition led by researchers at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), the unexpected penguin metropolis marks one of the single largest Adélie colonies in the world (they are native only to Antarctica), and disputes previous observations that the penguins have been steadily dwindling in numbers for the past 40 years."

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