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Posted on April 24, 2017 - 9:11am, by nwehner
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Via Sea Monster

"The temporal pattern of decline is concordant with the hypothesis that warming caused most Caribbean coral loss. Modern, human-caused ocean warming started around 1920 and began to accelerate in the late 1960s. Across the Caribbean (as well as globally) regional average coral cover began to decline roughly 10 years later (~ in the late 1970s-early 1980s, sampling is sparse during this period so it’s impossible to be more precise)."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on April 21, 2017 - 6:50pm, by abrown

Via European Geosciences Union

"In the first ecosystem-wide study of changing sea depths at five large coral reef tracts in Florida, the Caribbean and Hawai’i, researchers found the sea floor is eroding in all five places, and the reefs cannot keep pace with sea level rise. As a result, coastal communities protected by the reefs are facing increased risks from storms, waves and erosion. The study, by the US Geological Survey (USGS), is published today in Biogeosciences, a journal of the European Geosciences Union."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on April 21, 2017 - 6:42pm, by abrown
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Via NOAA

"Hot on the heels of the second warmest winter in the 138-year record, March continued the global warm trend that could last well into this year — especially with increasing chances for the arrival of El Nino by late summer or fall." 

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on April 21, 2017 - 6:33pm, by abrown

Via NPR

"Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards has declared a state of emergency over the state's rapidly eroding coastline. It's an effort to bring nationwide attention to the issue and speed up the federal permitting process for coastal restoration projects."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on April 21, 2017 - 9:19am, by nwehner
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Via Ars Technica

"Texas will probably be the state absorbing the greatest number of climate migrants, according to the model, possibly as many as 1.5 million. Georgia and North Carolina are next in line. Florida could lose as many as 2.5 million people, and Louisiana and New Jersey are also likely to be particularly hard-hit by migration away from coastal zones. But “no state is left untouched,” Hauer writes. And there will also be migration within states, meaning that more than half the counties in the US are likely to be affected by migration."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on April 20, 2017 - 10:06pm, by abrown

Via Phys.org

"New research from The University of Western Australia and the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) suggests that reef fishes eat differently when sharks are around. To avoid unwanted attention from large predators, these fishes may consume less energy-rich food and as a result become 'leaner', leading to significant knock-on effects in the reef environment."

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