OpenChannels News

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on February 5, 2018 - 10:40am, by raye
Tags: 

Via The Herald 

"For a big man Ross moves quickly, explaining each machine and technique rapid-fire, pointing to pipes that have burst under extreme pressure, plastic chips that can be melted and reused, household names on products sent to be tested. The reason we need plastics, he insists, is they are better for the job than the alternatives. Properly handled they are less harmful to the environment."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on February 5, 2018 - 9:43am, by raye
Tags: 

Via Hakai Magazine

"The Apalachicola Bay fishery dates back to the 1800s and once provided 12 percent of the country’s eastern oysters. Its devastation has raised a host of questions about the source of its decline. Was the collapse caused by overharvesting, a lack of fresh water, low nutrients, poor habitat management, or all of the above? It’s a debate that has raged everywhere from the fishing docks to the US Supreme Court."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on February 2, 2018 - 11:42am, by raye
Tags: 

Via Hakai Magazine

"While the IWC voted to enact a moratorium on commercial whaling in 1982, the worrisome loss of whales was noticeable much earlier. In 1946, whaling nations formed the IWC and attempted to make the industry more sustainable through gradual rules, quotas, and size limits. It wasn’t working—in the following three decades, Soviet fleets secretly killed almost 180,000 whales, and in the process irreparably harmed the population of North Pacific right whales."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on February 2, 2018 - 11:33am, by raye
Tags: 

Via The Guardian

"A new slavery risk register published in the US on Thursday has singled out the UK’s queen and giant scallops fisheries as the most at risk of modern slavery after a Guardian investigation found allegations of bonded labour in the industry."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on February 2, 2018 - 11:27am, by raye

Via The Guardian

"Before science became professionalised in the 19th century, amateur naturalists were collecting information and helping us understand the natural world. And it wasn’t just country vicars; Mary Anning, the daughter of a poor cabinet-maker, spent decades discovering fossils in the cliffs at Lyme Regis, in Dorset, and advancing human understanding of prehistoric life."

Pages