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Community Updates - External Link
Posted on February 2, 2018 - 11:18am, by raye
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Via The Verge

"In April of 2014, 2015, and 2016, researchers tracked nine female polar bears living on the sea ice of the Beaufort Sea, off the northern coast of Alaska, analyzing their blood and urine. The polar bears were also given GPS collars that recorded their movements and took videos of what the bears were doing. All this data showed that polar bears have a higher metabolism than we thought — requiring a meal of at least one adult ringed seal, or 19 newborn pups, every 10 to 12 days..."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on February 2, 2018 - 10:18am, by raye

Via IMBeR

"Despite widespread efforts to improve the integration of marine science into policy and practice around the world, the practicalities of how to successfully achieve this remains elusive to many environmental scientists. This is particularly true for early career researchers (ECRs). Evidence indicates that while influencing policy is an important goal for many ECRs, they often lack the skills to understand the complexities of policy processes, or are inadequately trained in how engage with decision-makers.

To this end, the Network of Early Career Scientists of the Integrated Marine Biosphere Research (IMBeR) project, together with the EU project EKLIPSE, is holding a workshop to equip EU-based early career marine scientists with the practical knowledge, skills and tools that are needed to operate more effectively at the science-policy-society interface."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on February 1, 2018 - 2:23pm, by raye

 Via Hakai Magazine

"On the Columbia River, a 400-meter concrete ladder ushers salmon past the Bonneville Dam. On Germany’s Elbe, a chain of linked pools conveys trout, eels, and burbot. In Saskatchewan, fishways assist pike, walleye, and suckers beyond the Cowan Dam. Yet despite centuries of progress, fishway failures still outnumber successes."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on February 1, 2018 - 2:08pm, by raye
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Via Mongabay

"The ecological impacts of repeated ocean warming remain poorly understood in the Galápagos, as they do for many of the world’s coral reefs. The geography of bleaching, recovery and resistance to warming water is virtually unknown because monitoring is very limited."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on February 1, 2018 - 11:15am, by raye
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Via NPR

"The Monterey Bay Aquarium's Seafood Watch program, known best for its red, yellow and green sustainable seafood-rating scheme, is unveiling its first Seafood Slavery Risk Tool on Thursday. It's a database designed to help corporate seafood buyers assess the risk of forced labor, human trafficking and hazardous child labor in the seafood they purchase."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on February 1, 2018 - 9:35am, by raye
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Via Phys.org

"When Arctic permafrost soil thaws, greenhouse gases are released into the atmosphere, but most of the carbon currently escaping from lakes in northern Alaska is relatively young, according to a new study led by researchers at the University of California, Irvine."

Community Updates - External Link
Posted on January 31, 2018 - 10:38am, by raye
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Via News Deeply: Oceans Deeply

"Sound not vision: Hydroacoustics allowed a single researcher to survey the fish population of a 17,600-acre preserve in Mexico in days. The technology could help small island states that are creating big marine protected areas but lack the resources to monitor them."

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