2015-03-25

Quantifying Patterns of Change in Marine Ecosystem Response to Multiple Pressures

Large SI, Fay G, Friedland KD, Link JS. Quantifying Patterns of Change in Marine Ecosystem Response to Multiple Pressures. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2015 ;10(3):e0119922. Available from: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0119922
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The ability to understand and ultimately predict ecosystem response to multiple pressures is paramount to successfully implement ecosystem-based management. Thresholds shifts and nonlinear patterns in ecosystem responses can be used to determine reference points that identify levels of a pressure that may drastically alter ecosystem status, which can inform management action. However, quantifying ecosystem reference points has proven elusive due in large part to the multi-dimensional nature of both ecosystem pressures and ecosystem responses. We used ecological indicators, synthetic measures of ecosystem status and functioning, to enumerate important ecosystem attributes and to reduce the complexity of the Northeast Shelf Large Marine Ecosystem (NES LME). Random forests were used to quantify the importance of four environmental and four anthropogenic pressure variables to the value of ecological indicators, and to quantify shifts in aggregate ecological indicator response along pressure gradients. Anthropogenic pressure variables were critical defining features and were able to predict an average of 8-13% (up to 25-66% for individual ecological indicators) of the variation in ecological indicator values, whereas environmental pressures were able to predict an average of 1-5 % (up to 9-26% for individual ecological indicators) of ecological indicator variation. Each pressure variable predicted a different suite of ecological indicator’s variation and the shapes of ecological indicator responses along pressure gradients were generally nonlinear. Threshold shifts in ecosystem response to exploitation, the most important pressure variable, occurred when commercial landings were 20 and 60% of total surveyed biomass. Although present, threshold shifts in ecosystem response to environmental pressures were much less important, which suggests that anthropogenic pressures have significantly altered the ecosystem structure and functioning of the NES LME. Gradient response curves provide ecologically informed transformations of pressure variables to explain patterns of ecosystem structure and functioning. By concurrently identifying thresholds for a suite of ecological indicator responses to multiple pressures, we demonstrate that ecosystem reference points can be evaluated and used to support ecosystem-based management.

The Seascape of Demersal Fish Nursery Areas in the North Mediterranean Sea, a First Step Towards the Implementation of Spatial Planning for Trawl Fisheries

Colloca F, Garofalo G, Bitetto I, Facchini MTeresa, Grati F, Martiradonna A, Mastrantonio G, Nikolioudakis N, Ordinas F, Scarcella G, et al. The Seascape of Demersal Fish Nursery Areas in the North Mediterranean Sea, a First Step Towards the Implementation of Spatial Planning for Trawl Fisheries. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2015 ;10(3):e0119590. Available from: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0119590
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The identification of nursery grounds and other essential fish habitats of exploited stocks is a key requirement for the development of spatial conservation planning aimed at reducing the adverse impact of fishing on the exploited populations and ecosystems. The reduction in juvenile mortality is particularly relevant in the Mediterranean and is considered as one of the main prerequisites for the future sustainability of trawl fisheries. The distribution of nursery areas of 11 important commercial species of demersal fish and shellfish was analysed in the European Union Mediterranean waters using time series of bottom trawl survey data with the aim of identifying the most persistent recruitment areas. A high interspecific spatial overlap between nursery areas was mainly found along the shelf break of many different sectors of the Northern Mediterranean indicating a high potential for the implementation of conservation measures. Overlap of the nursery grounds with existing spatial fisheries management measures and trawl fisheries restricted areas was also investigated. Spatial analyses revealed considerable variation depending on species and associated habitat/depth preferences with increased protection seen in coastal nurseries and minimal protection seen for deeper nurseries (e.g. Parapenaeus longirostris 6%). This is partly attributed to existing environmental policy instruments (e.g. Habitats Directive and Mediterranean Regulation EC 1967/2006) aiming at minimising impacts on coastal priority habitats such as seagrass, coralligenous and maerl beds. The new knowledge on the distribution and persistence of demersal nurseries provided in this study can support the application of spatial conservation measures, such as the designation of no-take Marine Protected Areas in EU Mediterranean waters and their inclusion in a conservation network. The establishment of no-take zones will be consistent with the objectives of the Common Fisheries Policy applying the ecosystem approach to fisheries management and with the requirements of the Marine Strategy Framework Directive to maintain or achieve seafloor integrity and good environmental status.

Shifting elasmobranch community assemblage at Cocos Island—an isolated marine protected area

White ER, Myers MC, Flemming JMills, Baum JK. Shifting elasmobranch community assemblage at Cocos Island—an isolated marine protected area. Conservation Biology [Internet]. 2015 . Available from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/cobi.12478/abstract
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Fishing pressure has increased the extinction risk of many elasmobranch (shark and ray) species. Although many countries have established no-take marine reserves, a paucity of monitoring data means it is still unclear if reserves are effectively protecting these species. We examined data collected by a small group of divers over the past 21 years at one of the world's oldest marine protected areas (MPAs), Cocos Island National Park, Costa Rica. We used mixed effects models to determine trends in relative abundance, or probability of occurrence, of 12 monitored elasmobranch species while accounting for variation among observers and from abiotic factors. Eight of 12 species declined significantly over the past 2 decades. We documented decreases in relative abundance for 6 species, including the iconic scalloped hammerhead shark (Sphyrna lewini) (−45%), whitetip reef shark (Triaenodon obesus) (−77%), mobula ray (Mobula spp.) (−78%), and manta ray (Manta birostris) (−89%) rays, and decreases in the probability of occurrence for 2 other species. Several of these species have small home ranges and should be better protected by an MPA, which underscores the notion that declines of marine megafauna will continue unabated in MPAs unless there is adequate enforcement effort to control fishing. In addition, probability of occurrence at Cocos Island of tiger (Galeocerdo cuvier), Galapagos (Carcharhinus galapagensis), blacktip (Carcharhinus limbatus), and whale (Rhincodon typus) sharks increased significantly. The effectiveness of MPAs cannot be evaluated by examining single species because population responses can vary depending on life history traits and vulnerability to fishing pressure.

Social perceptions of Colombian small-scale marine fisheries conflicts: Insights for management

Saavedra-Díaz LM, Rosenberg AA, Martín-López B. Social perceptions of Colombian small-scale marine fisheries conflicts: Insights for management. Marine Policy [Internet]. 2015 ;56:61 - 70. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X14003273
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

There is limited information about Colombian fisheries available from government sources. In consequence, as is the case for many artisanal or subsistence fisheries, fishermen, local leaders, and fisheries experts become a primary source of data for identifying priority issues for management attention. This study describes the problems that currently affect small-scale fishing activity and fishery resources in Colombia, based upon data collected from these main stakeholders. Data from extensive interviews and community meetings were carefully coded to produce a quantitative picture of the conflicts in these artisanal fisheries. Identified issues applied in three ways; across all communities, germane to one coastal area, or peculiar to individual communities. The results present the opportunity to focus management attention on key issues that can be addressed with co-management by communities in cooperation with government.

Characterising the spatial and temporal variability of the tidal-stream energy resource over the northwest European shelf seas

Robins PE, Neill SP, Lewis MJ, Ward SL. Characterising the spatial and temporal variability of the tidal-stream energy resource over the northwest European shelf seas. Applied Energy [Internet]. 2015 ;147:510 - 522. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0306261915003293
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

As devices move from full-scale prototype to commercial installations, it is important that developers have detailed knowledge of the tidal energy resource. Therefore, the spatial distribution of the tidal currents over the northwest European shelf seas has been examined to improve understanding of the tidal-stream energy resource. Using a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model (ROMS) at ∼1 km spatial resolution, and applying device characteristics of the Seagen-S turbine, we show that the ratio of the amplitudes of the M2 and S2 tidal currents can lead to significant variability in annual practical power generation – variability that is not accounted for when considering only the mean peak spring tidal velocities, as is generally the case in resource feasibility studies. In addition, we show that diurnal inequalities (governed by K1 and O1 tidal constituents) and tidal asymmetries (governed by the relationship between M2 and its compound tide M4) over the northwest European shelf seas can further affect power generation at potential high-energy sites. Based on these variabilities, the spatial distribution of the tidal-stream ‘capacity factor’ has been calculated. We find that mean peak spring tidal velocities can under-estimate the resource by up to 25%, and that annual practical power generation can vary by ∼15% for regions experiencing similar mean peak spring tidal velocities, due to the influence of other tidal constituents. Therefore, even preliminary resource assessments should be based on annual average power density, rather than peak spring tidal velocity.

Identifying public land stakeholder perspectives for implementing place-based land management

Brown G, de Bie K, Weber D. Identifying public land stakeholder perspectives for implementing place-based land management. Landscape and Urban Planning [Internet]. 2015 ;139:1 - 15. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169204615000560
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Public lands provide significant environmental, economic, and social values to society across a range of classifications and tenures. Stakeholders representing multiple interests are presumed to hold different management preferences for these lands. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate how stakeholder perspectives can influence place-based management preferences for public lands. We developed a multi-dimensional public land preference scale and used cluster analysis of responses to classify individuals (n = 1507) into stakeholder groups using data collected from a large public participation GIS (PPGIS) survey in Victoria, Australia. We analyzed the results of the two largest stakeholder groups (identified as “Preservation” and “Recreation”) to assess their spatial preferences for public land conservation, access, and development. We developed a method to assess the level of spatial stakeholder agreement, with the results identifying geographic areas of both agreement and disagreement between stakeholder groups. To determine the effects of unequal stakeholder participation in mapping, we performed sensitivity analysis by weighting the responses of the Recreation stakeholder group to approximate the mapping effort of the Preservation stakeholder group. The place-based management preferences changed significantly for conservation/development and improving/limiting public land access, while preferences for increasing/limiting facility development were less sensitive to stakeholder weighting. The spatial mapping of stakeholder preferences appears effective for identifying locations with high potential for conflict as well as areas of agreement, but would benefit from further research in a range of land management applications to provide further guidance on the analysis of stakeholder group responses that result from diverse stakeholder group participation.

Whelk (Buccinum undatum L.) stocks around the Island of Jersey, Channel Islands: Reassessment and implications for sustainable management

Shrives JPeter, Pickup SEmma, Morel GMichael. Whelk (Buccinum undatum L.) stocks around the Island of Jersey, Channel Islands: Reassessment and implications for sustainable management. Fisheries Research [Internet]. 2015 ;167:236 - 242. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165783615000922
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The exploitation of the common whelk (Buccinum undatum L.) has become an integral part of commercial fisheries in both Jersey and French waters. Since 2004 declining catches have been reported, and it has been suggested that existing management measures may not be effective. This study reports a further 8 years of annual monitoring of whelk catches from 2003 to 2011, using identical methodology and analysis as previous work. Jersey commercial whelk fishermen's logbook returns from 2007 to 2011, were also analysed for changes in effort and catch. Average catch per unit effort (CPUE) dropped by 36.7% from 3.3 kg per pot to 2.09 kg per pot. Since 2007, Fishermen's reported landings per unit effort for whelks, also dropped from 2.12 kg per pot to 1.75 kg per pot. Whilst a decline in catch rates of whelks greater than 44 mm shell length was reported earlier, this study also found catch rates for smaller whelks (<44 mm shell length) had declined by 54.5% from 0.44 kg per pot to 0.2 kg per pot, suggesting the start of possible recruitment overfishing. We found no statistical significance (repeated measures ANOVA) between the sample station grouping of ‘fished’ and ‘non-fished’, as reported previously, for either the small fraction or large fraction of the catch, both of which showed declines in CPUE. Analysis of fishermen's logbook returns showed that effort had varied over time and between statistical reporting areas. It is suggested that, given changes in fishing effort, an earlier grouping of fishing intensity is no longer relevant and we discuss the pitfalls of using such classifications and other arbitrary boundaries for spatial analyses which are then relied upon in making spatial planning and fisheries management decisions. More detailed spatial observations on fishing effort and trans-national sharing of data, along with relevant choices in joint management measures are required for the future sustainability of local whelk stocks.

An ecosystem-based approach to evaluate the ecological quality of Mediterranean undersea caves

Rastorgueff P-A, Bellan-Santini D, Bianchi CNike, Bussotti S, Chevaldonné P, Guidetti P, Harmelin J-G, Montefalcone M, Morri C, Perez T, et al. An ecosystem-based approach to evaluate the ecological quality of Mediterranean undersea caves. Ecological Indicators [Internet]. 2015 ;54:137 - 152. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1470160X15000916
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

A theoretical model of structure and functioning was constructed for the Mediterranean undersea cave ecosystem. This model integrates almost all representative components of the cave ecosystem and gives an idea of their faunal compositions, characteristics and related interactions.

This model constitutes the basis of the Ecosystem-Based Quality Index (EBQI) of the European Union's Marine Strategy Framework Directive, which aims at evaluating the ecological quality of an ecosystem. It is based on four crucial complementary elements: (i) each component was weighted in accordance with its importance in determining the structure and functioning of the cave ecosystem; (ii) a suite of relevant parameters were defined to assess the ecological state of each component of the cave ecosystem; (iii) these parameters were aggregated into one relevant index, the Cave EBQI (CavEBQI), to summarize the quality evaluation for each cave site; (iv) each value of ecological state is accompanied by a Confidence Index as a measure of its reliability.

The CavEBQI was used on 22 Mediterranean undersea caves of France and Italy. Disparities of ecological quality were found among caves but most of them ranged from moderate to high ecological quality. For some caves, no conclusion can be drawn when our method predicts a poor reliability of the evaluation of their ecological quality.

This ecosystem-based evaluation of the quality of undersea caves seems to be a powerful tool, with the advantage of being based on almost all its components, rather than just on a few species. It is accompanied by a measure of its reliability, hence it provides a reliable idea of the ecological state of the entire ecosystem at each cave site. Monitoring the ecological state of caves and the effects of disturbances over large geographic and temporal scales is made possible with CavEBQI. Applying the same method to other ecosystems, can provide an integrated view of a marine region, which is essential when addressing questions about protection, conservation and restoration.

The cumulative impact of tidal stream turbine arrays on sediment transport in the Pentland Firth

Fairley I, Masters I, Karunarathna H. The cumulative impact of tidal stream turbine arrays on sediment transport in the Pentland Firth. Renewable Energy [Internet]. 2015 ;80:755 - 769. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S096014811500186X
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

This contribution investigates the impact of the deployment of tidal stream turbine arrays on sediment dynamics and seabed morphology in the Pentland Firth, Scotland. The Pentland Firth is arguably the premier tidal stream site in the world and engineering developments are progressing rapidly. Therefore understanding and minimising impacts is vital to ensure the successful development of this nascent industry. Here a 3 dimensional coupled hydrodynamic and sediment transport numerical model is used to investigate the impact on sediment transport and morphodynamics of tidal stream arrays. The aim of the work presented here is twofold: firstly to provide prediction of the changes caused by multiple tidal stream turbine array developments to some of the unique sandy seabed environments in the Pentland Firth and secondly as a case study to determine the relationship between impacts of individual tidal stream farms and cumulative impacts of multiple farms. Due to connectivity in tidal flow it has been hypothesized that the cumulative impact of multiple arrays on sediment dynamics might be non-linear. This work suggests that, for the Pentland Firth, this is not the case: the cumulative impact of the 4 currently proposed arrays in the area is equal to the sum of the impacts of the individual arrays. Additionally, array implementation only has minimal effect on the baseline morphodynamics of the large sandbanks in the region, smaller more local sandbanks were not considered. These two results are extremely positive for tidal stream developers in the region since it removes the burden of assessing cumulative impact from individual developers and suggests that impacts to sub-sea morphodynamics is insignificant and hence is unlikely to be an impediment to development in the Pentland Firth with the currently proposed levels of extraction.

How to value biodiversity in environmental management?

Laurila-Pant M, Lehikoinen A, Uusitalo L, Venesjärvi R. How to value biodiversity in environmental management?. Ecological Indicators [Internet]. 2015 ;55:1 - 11. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1470160X15001119
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Biodiversity is globally recognised as a cornerstone of healthy ecosystems, and biodiversity conservation is increasingly becoming one of the important aims of environmental management. Evaluating the trade-offs of alternative management strategies requires quantitative estimates of the costs and benefits of their outcomes, including the value of biodiversity lost or preserved. This paper takes a decision-analytic standpoint, and reviews and discusses the alternative aspects of biodiversity valuation by dividing them into three categories: socio-cultural, economic, and ecological indicator approaches. We discuss the interplay between these three perspectives and suggest integrating them into an ecosystem-based management (EBM) framework, which permits us to acknowledge ecological systems as a rich mixture of interactive elements along with their social and economic aspects. In this holistic framework, socio-cultural preferences can serve as a tool to identify the ecosystem services most relevant to society, whereas monetary valuation offers more globally comparative and understandable values. Biodiversity indicators provide clear quantitative measures and information about the role of biodiversity in the functioning and health of ecosystems. In the multi-objective EBM approach proposed in the paper, biodiversity indicators serve to define threshold values (i.e., the minimum level required to maintain a healthy environment). An appropriate set of decision-making criteria and the best method for conducting the decision analysis depend on the context and the management problem in question. Therefore, we propose a sequence of steps to follow when quantitatively evaluating environmental management against biodiversity.

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