2018-02-28

Climate Change Impacts on Fisheries and Aquaculture: Potential Impacts of Climate Change in Brazilian Marine Fisheries and Aquaculture

Gasalla MA, Abdallah PR, Lemos D. Climate Change Impacts on Fisheries and Aquaculture: Potential Impacts of Climate Change in Brazilian Marine Fisheries and Aquaculture. In: Phillips BF, Pérez-Ramírez M Chichester, UK: John Wiley & Sons, Ltd; 2017. pp. 455 - 477. Available from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/9781119154051.ch14/summary
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Book Chapter

In this chapter we discuss the potential effects of climate change on Brazilian marine fisheries and aquaculture, a sector of significant national importance, exploring the projections from global models to that particular area of the South Atlantic Ocean, changes in the level and composition of fisheries production, physical alterations affecting fishing communities, main drivers of climatic variability, and changes upon marine and brackish aquaculture. In terms of the fisheries social–ecological systems, the potential impacts of ocean warming, sea level rise, changes in ocean circulation, stratification and acidity, and extreme events, are identified for both the natural and social sub-systems. The effect of El Niño Southern Oscillation is illustrated by a particular case study in Southern Brazil, where both impacted shrimp and mullet fisheries have been generating economic losses of more than US$7.5 million per year. In terms of aquaculture production, the effects of sea level rise, temperature shifts, rainfall, floods, water stress, algal blooms, acidification, El Niño/La Niña, and indirect climatic effects are explored for the Southern and Northern coasts of Brazil. Climate change poses additional challenges to the management of marine seafood production, potentially impacting living resources, communities, post-harvest sector and consumer market. This overview contributes to the evaluation of vulnerability, adaptation options, and much-needed actions, including interdisciplinary research. The need for different precautionary and remediation strategies to minimize losses and adapt to expected events is highlighted, while spatial issues and diversification are essential in assisting adaptation to potential forthcoming environmental stress.

Perceptions of climate and ocean change impacting the resources and livelihood of small-scale fishers in the South Brazil Bight

Martins IMachado, Gasalla MA. Perceptions of climate and ocean change impacting the resources and livelihood of small-scale fishers in the South Brazil Bight. Climatic Change [Internet]. 2018 . Available from: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10584-018-2144-z
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Coastal fishing communities are closely linked to the biological and ecological characteristics of exploited resources and the physical conditions associated with climate and ocean dynamics. Thus, the human populations that depend on fisheries are inherently exposed to climate variability and uncertainty. This study applied an ethno-oceanographic framework to investigate the perceptions of fishers on climate and ocean change to better understand the impacts of climate change on the coastal fishing communities of the South Brazil Bight. Seven coastal fishing communities that cover the regional diversity of the area were selected. Fishers were interviewed using a semi-structured questionnaire. The results suggest that fishers have detected climate-related changes in their environment such as reduced rainfall, increased drought events, calmer sea conditions, increases in air and ocean temperatures, changes in wind patterns and shoreline erosion. The perceptions of the fishers were compared to the available scientific data, and correlations were found with rainfall, wind speed and air and ocean temperatures. New hypotheses were raised based on the perceptions of fishers about sea level, coastal currents and sea conditions such as the hypothesis that the sea has become calmer. These perceived changes have positive and negative effects on the yields and livelihoods of fishers. The present work is the first evaluation of the perceptions of fishers on climate and ocean change and brings new understandings of climate-fishery-human interactions as well as provides inputs for future adaptation plans.

Accounting for black carbon lowers estimates of blue carbon storage services

Chew STheng, Gallagher JB. Accounting for black carbon lowers estimates of blue carbon storage services. Scientific Reports [Internet]. 2018 ;8(1). Available from: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-20644-2
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The canopies and roots of seagrass, mangrove, and saltmarsh protect a legacy of buried sedimentary organic carbon from resuspension and remineralisation. This legacy’s value, in terms of mitigating anthropogenic emissions of CO2, is based on total organic carbon (TOC) inventories to a depth likely to be disturbed. However, failure to subtract allochthonous recalcitrant carbon overvalues the storage service. Simply put, burial of oxidation-resistant organics formed outside of the ecosystem provides no additional protection from remineralisation. Here, we assess whether black carbon (BC), an allochthonous and recalcitrant form of organic carbon, is contributing to a significant overestimation of blue carbon stocks. To test this supposition, BC and TOC contents were measured in different types of seagrass and mangrove sediment cores across tropical and temperate regimes, with different histories of air pollution and fire together with a reanalysis of published data from a subtropical system. The results suggest current carbon stock estimates are positively biased, particularly for low-organic-content sandy seagrass environs, by 18 ± 3% (±95% confidence interval) and 43 ± 21% (±95% CI) for the temperate and tropical regions respectively. The higher BC fractions appear to originate from atmospheric deposition and substantially enrich the relatively low TOC fraction within these environs.

Valuing ecosystem services from blue forests: A systematic review of the valuation of salt marshes, sea grass beds and mangrove forests

Himes-Cornell A, Pendleton L, Atiyah P. Valuing ecosystem services from blue forests: A systematic review of the valuation of salt marshes, sea grass beds and mangrove forests. Ecosystem Services [Internet]. 2018 ;30:36 - 48. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2212041617305880?via%3Dihub
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $31.50
Type: Journal Article

Coastal ecosystems provide a number of life-sustaining services, from which benefits to humans can be derived. They are often inhabited by aquatic vegetation, such as mangroves, sea grasses and salt marshes. Given their wide geographic distribution and coverage, there is need to prioritize conservation efforts. An understanding of the human importance of these ecosystems can help with that prioritization. Here, we summarize a literature review of ecosystem service valuation studies. We discuss (1) the degree to which current valuation information is sufficient to prioritize blue carbon habitat conservation and restoration, (2) the relevancy of available studies, and (3) what is missing from the literature that would be needed to effectively prioritize conservation. Given the recent focus on blue carbon ecosystems in the international conservation, there are a number of areas where research on blue forest ecosystem assessment and valuation could be improved, from enhancing available methodologies to increasing valuation of rarely studied ecosystem services and wider geographic coverage of valuation studies. This review highlights these gaps and calls for a focus on broadening the ecosystem services that are valued, the methods used, and increasing valuation in underrepresented regions.

Long-Term Stability of Back-Arc Basin Hydrothermal Vents

Preez CDu, Fisher CR. Long-Term Stability of Back-Arc Basin Hydrothermal Vents. Frontiers in Marine Science [Internet]. 2018 ;5. Available from: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2018.00054/full
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Since the discovery of hydrothermal vents 40-years ago, long-term time-series have focused on mid-ocean ridge systems. Based on these studies, hydrothermal vents are widely considered to be dynamic, ephemeral habitats. Under this premise, national, and international regulatory bodies are currently planning for the commercial mining of polymetallic sulfide deposits from hydrothermal vents. However, here we provide evidence of longevity and habitat stability that does not align with historic generalizations. Over a 10-year time-series focused on the back-arc basin systems off the west coast of the Kingdom of Tonga (South Pacific), we find the hydrothermal vents are remarkably stable habitats. Using high-resolution photo mosaics and spatially explicit in situ measurements to document natural changes of five hydrothermal vent edifices, we discovered striking stability in the vent structures themselves, as well as in the composition and coverage of the vent-associated species, with some evidence of microdistribution permanence. These findings challenge the way we think about hydrothermal vent ecosystems and their vulnerability and resilience to deep-sea mining activities.

Exploring the Ecology of Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vents in a Metacommunity Framework

Mullineaux LS, Metaxas A, Beaulieu SE, Bright M, Gollner S, Grupe BM, Herrera S, Kellner JB, Levin LA, Mitarai S, et al. Exploring the Ecology of Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vents in a Metacommunity Framework. Frontiers in Marine Science [Internet]. 2018 ;5. Available from: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2018.00049/full
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Species inhabiting deep-sea hydrothermal vents are strongly influenced by the geological setting, as it provides the chemical-rich fluids supporting the food web, creates the patchwork of seafloor habitat, and generates catastrophic disturbances that can eradicate entire communities. The patches of vent habitat host a network of communities (a metacommunity) connected by dispersal of planktonic larvae. The dynamics of the metacommunity are influenced not only by birth rates, death rates and interactions of populations at the local site, but also by regional influences on dispersal from different sites. The connections to other communities provide a mechanism for dynamics at a local site to affect features of the regional biota. In this paper, we explore the challenges and potential benefits of applying metacommunity theory to vent communities, with a particular focus on effects of disturbance. We synthesize field observations to inform models and identify data gaps that need to be addressed to answer key questions including: (1) what is the influence of the magnitude and rate of disturbance on ecological attributes, such as time to extinction or resilience in a metacommunity; (2) what interactions between local and regional processes control species diversity, and (3) which communities are “hot spots” of key ecological significance. We conclude by assessing our ability to evaluate resilience of vent metacommunities to human disturbance (e.g., deep-sea mining). Although the resilience of a few highly disturbed vent systems in the eastern Pacific has been quantified, these values cannot be generalized to remote locales in the western Pacific or mid Atlantic where disturbance rates are different and information on local controls is missing.

Science for MPA Management: Understanding the UN/EU Ecosystem Approach and the Role of MPAs

Kersting D, Webster C. Science for MPA Management: Understanding the UN/EU Ecosystem Approach and the Role of MPAs. [Internet]. 2018 ;(7). Available from: https://marxiv.org/z7698
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Newsletter

The objective of this issue of «Science for MPA Management» is to explore the process of the ecosystem approach adopted in 2008 by the Contracting Parties to the Barcelona Convention and the Marine Strategy Framework Directive of the European Union. In this context, Mediterranean Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) are identified as a key element in the implementation of monitoring that aims to report on the progress made towards the achievement of the Good Environmental Status of the Mediterranean. Their role must nevertheless be strengthened, with in particular a potential support from the MedPAN network to coordinate monitoring in MPAs on different components related to the EcAP process on a Mediterranean scale.

The ‘presentist bias’ in time-series data: Implications for fisheries science and policy

Zeller D, Pauly D. The ‘presentist bias’ in time-series data: Implications for fisheries science and policy. Marine Policy [Internet]. 2018 ;90:14 - 19. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X17306334
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The bias in catch time series data that occurs when improvements in fisheries catch reporting systems (e.g., consideration of a previously unmonitored fishery, or region) lead to an increase in current catches without the corresponding past catches being corrected retroactively, here called ‘presentist bias’ is described, and two examples, pertaining to Mozambique and Tanzania are given. This bias has the effect of generating catch time series at the aggregate that appear ‘stable’ or increasing when in fact catches are declining over time, with potentially serious consequences for the assessment of the status of national fisheries, or in interpreting the global landings data disseminated by the FAO. The presentist bias can be compensated for by retroactive national data corrections as done, e.g., through catch reconstructions.

Fluctuating interaction network and time-varying stability of a natural fish community

Ushio M, Hsieh C-hao, Masuda R, Deyle ER, Ye H, Chang C-W, Sugihara G, Kondoh M. Fluctuating interaction network and time-varying stability of a natural fish community. Nature [Internet]. 2018 ;554(7692):360 - 363. Available from: https://www.nature.com/articles/nature25504?utm_source=Lenfest+Ocean+Program+List&utm_campaign=066e16bd7f-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2017_12_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_3cb503819c-066e16bd7f-
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $20.00
Type: Journal Article

Ecological theory suggests that large-scale patterns such as community stability can be influenced by changes in interspecific interactions that arise from the behavioural and/or physiological responses of individual species varying over time1,2,3. Although this theory has experimental support2,4,5, evidence from natural ecosystems is lacking owing to the challenges of tracking rapid changes in interspecific interactions (known to occur on timescales much shorter than a generation time)6and then identifying the effect of such changes on large-scale community dynamics. Here, using tools for analysing nonlinear time series6,7,8,9 and a 12-year-long dataset of fortnightly collected observations on a natural marine fish community in Maizuru Bay, Japan, we show that short-term changes in interaction networks influence overall community dynamics. Among the 15 dominant species, we identify 14 interspecific interactions to construct a dynamic interaction network. We show that the strengths, and even types, of interactions change with time; we also develop a time-varying stability measure based on local Lyapunov stability for attractor dynamics in non-equilibrium nonlinear systems. We use this dynamic stability measure to examine the link between the time-varying interaction network and community stability. We find seasonal patterns in dynamic stability for this fish community that broadly support expectations of current ecological theory. Specifically, the dominance of weak interactions and higher species diversity during summer months are associated with higher dynamic stability and smaller population fluctuations. We suggest that interspecific interactions, community network structure and community stability are dynamic properties, and that linking fluctuating interaction networks to community-level dynamic properties is key to understanding the maintenance of ecological communities in nature.

DNA-based identification reveals illegal trade of threatened shark species in a global elasmobranch conservation hotspot

Feitosa LManir, Martins APaula Barb, Giarrizzo T, Macedo W, Monteiro ILeonardo, Gemaque R, Nunes JLuiz Silva, Gomes F, Schneider H, Sampaio I, et al. DNA-based identification reveals illegal trade of threatened shark species in a global elasmobranch conservation hotspot. Scientific Reports [Internet]. 2018 ;8(1). Available from: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-21683-5
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Here, we report trading of endangered shark species in a world hotspot for elasmobranch conservation in Brazil. Data on shark fisheries are scarce in Brazil, although the northern and northeastern regions have the highest indices of shark bycatch. Harvest is made primarily with processed carcasses lacking head and fins, which hampers reliable species identification and law enforcement on illegal catches. We used partial sequences of two mitochondrial genes (COI and/or NADH2) to identify 17 shark species from 427 samples being harvested and marketed on the northern coast of Brazil. Nine species (53%) are listed under some extinction threat category according to Brazilian law and international authorities (IUCN – International Union for Conservation of Nature; CITES – Convention on International Trade of Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora). The number increases to 13 (76%) if we also consider the Near Threatened category. Hammerhead sharks are under threat worldwide, and composed 18.7% of samples, with Sphyrna mokarran being the fourth most common species among samples. As illegal trade of threatened shark species is a worldwide conservation problem, molecular identification of processed meat or specimens lacking diagnostic body parts is a highly effective tool for species identification and law enforcement.

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