2018-05-16

Reconstructing global marine fishing gear use: Catches and landed values by gear type and sector

Cashion T, Al-Abdulrazzak D, Belhabib D, Derrick B, Divovich E, Moutopoulos DK, Noël S-L, Palomares MLDeng, Teh LCL, Zeller D, et al. Reconstructing global marine fishing gear use: Catches and landed values by gear type and sector. Fisheries Research [Internet]. 2018 ;206:57 - 64. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165783618301097
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

The interaction between fishing gears and the marine environment define ‘fisheries,’ and the effect of gears on marine ecosystems and fish stocks has been the source of much debate. Here, we present the first summary of globally reconstructed fisheries catches by major gear categories for 1950–2014. We used the Sea Around Us reconstructed global catch database that accounts for reported and unreported fisheries catches, and associated all catches to a fishing gear category. We assigned all industrial (i.e., large-scale) fisheries catches to industrial gear categories by fishing country, taxon, year and the area of fishing. Additionally, we derived catches by individual small-scale gear types for the most-important small-scale fishing countries in each of nine regions around the world, and applied their gear use to similar countries in each of the regions, to serve as a preliminary small-scale catch-by-gear assignment that can be improved upon over time. The combination of these account for gear use for all marine fisheries globally. We found that two industrial gear types, bottom trawling and purse seining, jointly account for over 53% of all catches, while bottom trawling alone dominated discarded catches. In the small-scale sector, over 60% of catches were caught by gillnets, various line gear, and encircling nets. Small-scale fisheries contributed most to the value of landed catches, while industrial bottom trawlers were responsible for discarding large amounts of potentially valuable catches. Catches by purse seines fluctuated over time, mainly due to variability of the underlying species, e.g., anchovies and sardines. The distribution and scale of use of different fishing gears, combined with knowledge of their divergent environmental impacts should allow a new wave of research into the global impacts of fisheries.

Why is the global governance of plastic failing the oceans?

Dauvergne P. Why is the global governance of plastic failing the oceans?. Global Environmental Change [Internet]. 2018 ;51:22 - 31. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0959378017314140
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

On some measures, the global governance of plastic is improving. Curbside recycling and community cleanups are increasing. Companies like Toyota, Walmart, and Procter & Gamble are reducing waste to landfill. And all around the world, as research consolidates and activism intensifies, towns, cities, and legislatures are banning some uses of plastic, such as for grocery bags and as microbeads in consumer products. Yet the amount of plastic flowing into the oceans is on track to double from 2010 to 2025. Why? Partly, the dispersal, durability, and mobility of microplastics make governance extremely hard. At the same time, the difficulty of governing plastic has been rising as production accelerates, consumption globalizes, pollution sources diversify, and international trade obscures responsibility. As pressures and complexities mount, the global governance of plastic – characterized by fragmented authority, weak international institutions, uneven regulations, uncoordinated policies, and business-oriented solutions – is failing to rein in marine plastic pollution. In large part, as this article demonstrates, this governance landscape reflects industry efforts to resist government regulation, deflect accountability, and thwart critics, coupled with industry advocacy of corporate self-regulation and consumer responsibility as principles of governance. These findings confirm the need for more hard-hitting domestic regulation of industry as well as an international plastics treaty to scale up local reforms.

Multicriteria estimate of coral reef fishery sustainability

McClanahan TR. Multicriteria estimate of coral reef fishery sustainability. Fish and Fisheries [Internet]. 2018 . Available from: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/faf.12293
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

A holistic basis for achieving ecosystem‐based management is needed to counter the continuing degradation of coral reefs. The high variation in recovery rates of fish, corresponding to fisheries yields, and the ecological complexity of coral reefs have challenged efforts to estimate fisheries sustainability. Yet, estimating stable yields can be determined when biomass, recovery, changes in per area yields and ecological change are evaluated together. Long‐term rates of change in yields and fishable biomass‐yield ratios have been the key missing variables for most coral reef assessments. Calibrating a fishery yield model using independently collected fishable biomass and recovery data produced large confidence intervals driven by high variability in biomass recovery rates that precluded accurate or universal yields for coral reefs. To test the model's predictions, I present changes in Kenyan reef fisheries for >20 years. Here, exceeding yields above 6 tonnes km−2 year−1 when fishable biomass was ~20 tonnes/km2 (~20% of unfished biomass) resulted in a >2.4% annual decline. Therefore, rates of decline fit the mean settings well and model predictions may therefore be used as a benchmark in reefs with mean recovery rates (i.e. r = 0.20–0.25). The mean model settings indicate a maximum sustained yield (MSY) of ~6 tonnes km−2 year−1 when fishable biomass was ~50 tonnes/km2. Variable reported recovery rates indicate that high sustainable yields will depend greatly on maintaining these rates, which can be reduced if productivity declines and management of stocks and functional diversity are ineffective. A number of ecological state‐yield trade‐off occurs as abrupt ecological changes prior to biomass levels that produce MSY.

Mechanism-based explanations of impasses in the governance of ecosystem-based adaptation

Sieber IMaren, Biesbroek R, de Block D. Mechanism-based explanations of impasses in the governance of ecosystem-based adaptation. Regional Environmental Change [Internet]. 2018 . Available from: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10113-018-1347-1
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Many climate change adaptation scholars recognise the complexities in the governance of adaptation. Most have used the concept of ‘barriers to adaptation’ in an attempt to describe why governance of adaptation is challenging. However, these studies have recently been critiqued for over simplifying complex governance processes by referring to the static concept of barriers, thereby ignoring dynamic complexity as a root explanatory cause. This paper builds the argument that how barriers are currently used in the literature is insufficient to explain why the governance of adaptation often proves difficult. We adopt a so-called mechanism-based approach to investigate how and why the governance of ecosystem-based adaptation (EbA) reaches impasses in five cases in Thailand and the Netherlands. Our findings show six causal mechanisms that explain impasses in the five case studies: (1) frame polarisation, (2) timing synchronisation, (3) risk innovation, (4) rules of the game, (5) veto players and (6) lost in translation. Several of these causal mechanisms are recurring and emerge under specific contextual conditions or are activated by other mechanisms. Our findings provide valuable insights into the impasses in the governance of EbA and allow for critical reflections on the analytical value of the mechanism-based approach in explaining why the governance of adaptation proves difficult and how this can be overcome.

Marine mammals of Mexico: Richness patterns, protected areas, and conservation trends

Muzquiz-Villalobos M, Pompa-Mansilla S. Marine mammals of Mexico: Richness patterns, protected areas, and conservation trends. Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science [Internet]. 2018 ;208:153 - 160. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0272771417309022#!
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

Mexico registers about 60% of the total of marine mammals worldwide. However, species listed under a risk category show that, globally, Mexico faces big marine mammal conservation challenges. Thus, it becomes essential to successfully apply the existing knowledge into interdisciplinary conservation programs. We generated a presence/absence species richness map containing all 47 marine mammal species recorded in Mexico's Exclusive Economic Zone. After selecting nine oceanographic variables influencing marine mammal species richness, the top three factors influencing such richness were sea surface temperature and dissolved oxygen grouped in component #1, and salinity composed component #2. We also identified the species that are protected within a Marine Protected Area (MPA) category and its representation in management programs of these areas. Currently, 98% of marine mammal species distributed in Mexican waters are protected within an MPA; nevertheless, around 12% of them are not listed in management programs. Three priority sites in the Pacific Ocean and one for the Gulf of Mexico were identified to promote their conservation. Considering the sentinel and umbrella attributes of marine mammals, the information presented here will not only benefit their populations, but will also contribute to address marine species and ecosystems threats and improve the effectiveness of conservation plans.

Re-storying marine conservation: Integrating art and science to explore and articulate ideas, visions and expressions of marine space

Brennan RE. Re-storying marine conservation: Integrating art and science to explore and articulate ideas, visions and expressions of marine space. Ocean & Coastal Management [Internet]. 2018 . Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S096456911730279X?via%3Dihub
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

Art-science collaborations are proliferating as the benefits of bringing artists and scientists together are increasingly recognised and supported. This paper documents an example of an artist and scientist with overlapping (as opposed to the more usual mutually exclusive) practices, in terms of artistic and scientific approaches to the research material. It illustrates how a collaboration between a marine social scientist (the author) and a visual artist within a specific art-science methodological framework helped to inspire a different approach to a marine protected area dispute between the Scottish Government and the small Scottish island community of Barra, Outer Hebrides, Scotland. The art-science collaboration resulted in Sea Stories, an interactive, online, cultural map of the sea around the island of Barra. The participatory mapping process to create the Sea Stories map involved visions and expressions of marine space being constructed through constant interaction between the research team and research participants. It revealed different ways of knowing the marine environment, hitherto not visible or acknowledged within the marine policy environment where the protection of biological diversity was the focus. The acknowledgement of a rich and diverse cultural heritage bound up with the marine biological diversity opened up possibilities for the design of a community-led and government-supported co-management process that recognises the social relations which form part of the island’s social-ecological system.

Use of unmanned aerial vehicles for efficient beach litter monitoring

Martin C, Parkes S, Zhang Q, Zhang X, McCabe MF, Duarte CM. Use of unmanned aerial vehicles for efficient beach litter monitoring. Marine Pollution Bulletin [Internet]. 2018 ;131:662 - 673. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025326X18302765
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
Yes
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

A global beach litter assessment is challenged by use of low-efficiency methodologies and incomparable protocols that impede data integration and acquisition at a national scale. The implementation of an objective, reproducible and efficient approach is therefore required. Here we show the application of a remote sensing based methodology using a test beach located on the Saudi Arabian Red Sea coastline. Litter was recorded via image acquisition from an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle, while an automatic processing of the high volume of imagery was developed through machine learning, employed for debris detection and classification in three categories. Application of the method resulted in an almost 40 times faster beach coverage when compared to a standard visual-census approach. While the machine learning tool faced some challenges in correctly detecting objects of interest, first classification results are promising and motivate efforts to further develop the technique and implement it at much larger scales.

Underwater operational noise level emitted by a tidal current turbine and its potential impact on marine fauna

Lossent J, Lejart M, Folegot T, Clorennec D, Di Iorio L, Gervaise C. Underwater operational noise level emitted by a tidal current turbine and its potential impact on marine fauna. Marine Pollution Bulletin [Internet]. 2018 ;131:323 - 334. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025326X18301681
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Marine renewable energy development raised concerns over the impact of underwater noise. Here we assess the acoustic impacts of an operating tidal current turbine (Paimpol-Bréhat site, France) on marine fauna. Its source level (SL) has been measured in situ using 19 drifting transects at distances between 100 m to 2400 m from the turbine. SL ranged from 118 to 152 dB re1 μ[email protected] m in third-octave bands at frequencies between 40 and 8192 Hz. It is comparable to the SL of a 19 m boat travelling at 10kt speed. This SL was used to estimate the impact of this noise type based on acoustic propagation simulations. The acoustic footprint of the device corresponds to a 1.5 km radius disk. Our results show that within this area of greatest potential impact, physiological injury of the hearing apparatus of invertebrates, fishes and marine mammals is improbable. Behavioral disturbance may occur up to 1 km around the device for harbor porpoises only. This is of little concern for a single turbine. However, greater concern on turbine noise impact, particularly on behavioral reactions has to be granted for a farm with up to 100 turbine. The lack of consolidated knowledge on behavioral disturbances identifies the needs for specific research programs.

Leave no traces – Beached marine litter shelters both invasive and native species

Garcia-Vazquez E, Cani A, Diem A, Ferreira C, Geldhof R, Marquez L, Molloy E, Perché S. Leave no traces – Beached marine litter shelters both invasive and native species. Marine Pollution Bulletin [Internet]. 2018 ;131:314 - 322. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025326X18302601
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Marine litter has been considered a potential transport vector of non-indigenous species. In this study developed in Tjärnö (Sweden), at the entry of the Baltic Sea, the communities inhabiting coastal litter and natural substrates (N = 5448 macroorganisms) were monitored from eight sites of different ecological conditions. The results showed that litter can support high densities of marine organisms and represent a new habitat in the studied coast. The taxonomic profile of the communities supported by marine litter and hard natural substrate were significantly different. Moreover, opposite to the expectations of reduced diversity in artificial structures, more diverse communities were found on litter. Non-indigenous species were attached mainly to non-plastic artificial materials. From these results it can be concluded that marine litter can significantly alter the biotic composition of coastal ecosystem, representing a shelter for invasive species and diverse natives.

Keeping up with sea-level rise: Carbonate production rates in Palau and Yap, western Pacific Ocean

van Woesik R, Cacciapaglia CWilliam. Keeping up with sea-level rise: Carbonate production rates in Palau and Yap, western Pacific Ocean Bianchi CNike. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2018 ;13(5):e0197077. Available from: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0197077
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Coral reefs protect islands from tropical storm waves and provide goods and services for millions of islanders worldwide. Yet it is unknown how coral reefs in general, and carbonate production in particular, will respond to sea-level rise and thermal stress associated with climate change. This study compared the reef-building capacity of different shallow-water habitats at twenty-four sites on each of two islands, Palau and Yap, in the western Pacific Ocean. We were particularly interested in estimating the inverse problem of calculating the value of live coral cover at which net carbonate production becomes negative, and whether that value varied across habitats. Net carbonate production varied among habitats, averaging 10.2 kg CaCO3 m-2 y-1 for outer reefs, 12.7 kg CaCO3 m-2 y-1 for patch reefs, and 7.2 kg CaCO3 m-2 y-1 for inner reefs. The value of live coral cover at which net carbonate production became negative varied across habitats, with highest values on inner reefs. These results suggest that some inner reefs tend to produce less carbonate, and therefore need higher coral cover to produce enough carbonate to keep up with sea-level rise than outer and patch reefs. These results also suggest that inner reefs are more vulnerable to sea-level rise than other habitats, which stresses the need for effective land-use practices as the climate continues to change. Averaging across all reef habitats, the rate of carbonate production was 9.7 kg CaCO3 m-2 y-1, or approximately 7.9 mm y-1 of potential vertical accretion. Such rates of vertical accretion are higher than projected averages of sea-level rise for the representative concentration pathway (RCP) climate-change scenarios 2.6, 4.5, and 6, but lower than for the RCP scenario 8.5.

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