2018-05-16

Ocean plastics and the BBNJ treaty—is plastic frightening enough to insert itself into the BBNJ treaty, or do we need to wait for a treaty of its own?

Tiller R, Nyman E. Ocean plastics and the BBNJ treaty—is plastic frightening enough to insert itself into the BBNJ treaty, or do we need to wait for a treaty of its own?. Journal of Environmental Studies and Sciences [Internet]. 2018 . Available from: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s13412-018-0495-4
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Marine litter, and plastics in particular, is fast rising to the top of the political agenda at all levels of governance. The popular phrase today, evoked at all political meetings, in all speeches and at all cocktail parties, is that by 2050, there will be more plastics than fish in the ocean. This is a simple and valid prediction naturally, since global fish stocks are fished at capacity and therefore not increasing in number—whereas the inflow of plastics into the ocean is continuous and rising. Stopping litter from entering the marine ecosystem is therefore the logical step to stop the prediction from coming true. Do we have time to wait for the international community to come together to ratify a treaty text on this, with the required years of negotiations in between, though? Granted, the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) passed 13 nonbinding resolutions in December of 2017 of which one was on marine microplastics. They are still nonbinding though and without any teeth or financial instruments attached. The General Assembly, however, adopted resolution 72/249 also in December 2017, on a conference spanning a 2-year period, starting in 2018, where the end goal is to agree on a treaty on the protection of biodiversity in areas beyond national jurisdiction (BBNJ). We argue in this article that, rather than waiting for a treaty that is plastics specific, a path to fast action could be to incorporate this into these negotiations, since plastic is interweaved as a substantial stressor to the system and to biodiversity in all areas of the ocean.

Effects of increased specialization on revenue of Alaskan salmon fishers over four decades

Ward EJ, Anderson SC, Shelton AO, Brenner RE, Adkison MD, Beaudreau AH, Watson JT, Shriver JC, Haynie AC, Williams BC. Effects of increased specialization on revenue of Alaskan salmon fishers over four decades Punt A. Journal of Applied Ecology [Internet]. 2018 ;55(3):1082 - 1091. Available from: https://besjournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/1365-2664.13058
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article
  1. Theory and previous studies have shown that commercial fishers with a diversified catch across multiple species may experience benefits such as increased revenue and reduced variability in revenue. However, fishers can only increase the species diversity of their catch if they own fishing permits that allow multiple species to be targeted, or if they own multiple single‐species permits. Individuals holding a single permit can only increase catch diversity within the confines of their permit (e.g. by fishing longer or over a broader spatial area).
  2. Using a large dataset of individual salmon fishers in Alaska, we build a Bayesian variance function regression model to understand how diversification impacts revenue and revenue variability, and how these effects have evolved since the 1970s.
  3. Applying these models to six salmon fisheries that encompass a broad geographic range and a variety of harvesting methods and species, we find that the majority of these fisheries have experienced reduced catch diversity through time and increasing benefits of specialization on mean individual revenues.
  4. One factor that has been hypothesized to reduce catch diversity in salmon fisheries is large‐scale hatchery production. While our results suggest negative correlations between hatchery returns and catch diversity for some fisheries, we find little evidence for a change in variability of annual catches associated with increased hatchery production.
  5. Synthesis and applications. Despite general trends towards more specialization among commercial fishers in Alaska, and more fishers exclusively targeting salmon, we find that catching fewer species can have positive effects on revenue. With increasing specialization, it is important to understand how individuals buffer against risk, as well as any barriers that prevent diversification. In addition to being affected by environmental variability, fishers are also affected by economic factors including demand and prices offered by processors. Life‐history variation in the species targeted may also play a role. Individuals participating in Alaskan fisheries with high contributions of pink salmon — which have the shortest life cycles of all Pacific salmon — also have the highest variability in year‐to‐year revenue.

Using an educational video-briefing to mitigate the ecological impacts of scuba diving

Giglio VJ, Luiz OJ, Chadwick NE, Ferreira CEL. Using an educational video-briefing to mitigate the ecological impacts of scuba diving. Journal of Sustainable Tourism [Internet]. 2018 ;26(5):782 - 797. Available from: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09669582.2017.1408636?journalCode=rsus20
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $42.50
Type: Journal Article

Recreational scuba diving is rapidly increasing, and the negative impacts to marine reef biota are of conservation concern. Educational approaches have been tested to mitigate diver damage to benthic organisms, but logistical constraints impede their implementation in many locations. We investigated the behaviors of scuba divers in terms of their contacts with benthic organisms, and assessed how an educational video-briefing caused changes in diver behavior. The video provided environmental information to divers, and enhanced their use of low-impact diving techniques. Divers who received the video-briefing exhibited significantly lower rates of contact with and damage to the benthos, than did divers who did not receive a briefing. The level of diving experience did not correlate with the rate of benthic contact in either group of divers. Male divers and photographers both contacted the benthos significantly less, and female divers and photographers both caused significantly less damage when they viewed the video-briefing prior to diving. Our findings highlight the importance of easily implemented, standardized educational approaches such as the use of video-briefings to mitigate the impacts of scuba diving. This study adds to the framework of tested strategies available to support the sustainable use of marine areas by the diving tourism industry.

Demonstrating multiple benefits from periodically harvested fisheries closures

Goetze JS, Claudet J, Januchowski-Hartley F, Langlois TJ, Wilson SK, White C, Weeks R, Jupiter SD. Demonstrating multiple benefits from periodically harvested fisheries closures Trenkel V. Journal of Applied Ecology [Internet]. 2018 ;55(3):1102 - 1113. Available from: https://besjournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/1365-2664.13047
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $38.00
Type: Journal Article
  1. Periodically harvested closures (PHCs) are one of the most common forms of fisheries management in Melanesia, demonstrating multiple objectives, including sustaining fish stocks and increasing catch efficiency to support small‐scale fisheries. No studies have comprehensively assessed their ability to provide short‐term fisheries benefits across the entire harvest regime.
  2. We present a novel analytical framework to guide a meta‐analysis and assist future research in conceptualizing and assessing the potential of PHCs to deliver benefits for multiple fisheries‐related objectives.
  3. Ten PHCs met our selection criteria and on average, they provided a 48% greater abundance and 92% greater biomass of targeted fishes compared with areas open to fishing prior to being harvested.
  4. This translated into tangible harvest benefits, with fishers removing 21% of the abundance and 49% of the biomass within PHCs, resulting in few post‐harvest protection benefits.
  5. When PHCs are larger, closed for longer periods or well enforced, short‐term fisheries benefits are improved. However, an increased availability of fish within PHCs leads to greater removal during harvests.
  6. Synthesis and applications. Periodically harvested closures (PHCs) can provide short‐term fisheries benefits. Use of the analytical framework presented here will assist in determining long‐term fisheries and conservation benefits. We recommend PHCs be closed to fishing for as long as possible, be as large as possible, that compliance be encouraged via community engagement and enforcement, and strict deadlines/goals for harvesting set to prevent overfishing.

Overview on Untargeted Methods to Combat Food Frauds: A Focus on Fishery Products

Fiorino GM, Garino C, Arlorio M, Logrieco AF, Losito I, Monaci L. Overview on Untargeted Methods to Combat Food Frauds: A Focus on Fishery Products. Journal of Food Quality [Internet]. 2018 ;2018:1 - 13. Available from: https://www.hindawi.com/journals/jfq/2018/1581746/
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Authenticity and traceability of food products are of primary importance at all levels of the production process, from raw materials to finished products. Authentication is also a key aspect for accurate labeling of food, which is required to help consumers in selecting appropriate types of food products. With the aim of guaranteeing the authenticity of foods, various methodological approaches have been devised over the past years, mainly based on either targeted or untargeted analyses. In this review, a brief overview of current analytical methods tailored to authenticity studies, with special regard to fishery products, is provided. Focus is placed on untargeted methods that are attracting the interest of the analytical community thanks to their rapidity and high throughput; such methods enable a fast collection of “fingerprinting signals” referred to each authentic food, subsequently stored into large database for the construction of specific information repositories. In the present case, methods capable of detecting fish adulteration/substitution and involving sensory, physicochemical, DNA-based, chromatographic, and spectroscopic measurements, combined with chemometric tools, are illustrated and commented on.

Adapting Fisheries and Their Management To Climate Change: A Review of Concepts, Tools, Frameworks, and Current Progress Toward Implementation

Lindegren M, Brander K. Adapting Fisheries and Their Management To Climate Change: A Review of Concepts, Tools, Frameworks, and Current Progress Toward Implementation. Reviews in Fisheries Science & Aquaculture [Internet]. 2018 ;26(3):400 - 415. Available from: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/23308249.2018.1445980
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $50.00
Type: Journal Article

As the body of literature on marine climate impacts accumulates the question is no longer whether marine ecosystems and their living resources are affected, but what we as scientists, managers and policy makers can do to prepare for the inevitable changes. In this study, the current literature on how fisheries, fisheries management and fishing communities react and adapt to projected climate impacts is reviewed. First, a brief background on adaptation research, including definitions of key terms and concepts is provided. Secondly, available frameworks and tools to assess and foster adaptation to climate change are outlined and discussed. Thirdly, case studies illustrating several key aspects (political, legal, economic, and social) influencing adaptation at the level of fisheries, communities and households worldwide are presented and compared. Finally, a brief synthesis of the main issues and their implications for adaptation within fisheries and fisheries management at large are identified and discussed. In summary, the study illustrates that while a great wealth of local and regional knowledge, as well as tools and approaches to foster adaptation exists, examples of concrete adaptation actions and measures are surprisingly few. This emphasizes the need to increase the general awareness of climate change impacts and to build a solid political, legal, financial and social infrastructure within which the available knowledge, tools and approaches can be set to practical use in implementing adaptation to climate change.

Global trends on reef fishes’ ecology of fear: Flight initiation distance for conservation

Nunes JAnchieta C, Costa Y, Blumstein DT, Leduc AOHC, Dorea AC, Benevides LJ, Sampaio CLS, Barros F. Global trends on reef fishes’ ecology of fear: Flight initiation distance for conservation. Marine Environmental Research [Internet]. 2018 ;136:153 - 157. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0141113617307390
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Escape behaviors have a great potential as an indicator of the efficacy of management. For instance, the degree of fear perceived by fishes targeted by fisheries is frequently higher in unprotected marine areas than in areas where some protection is provided. We systematically reviewed the literature on how fear, which we define as variation in escape behavior, was quantified in reef fishes. In the past 25 years, a total of 33 studies were identified, many of which were published within the last five years and nearly 40% of those (n = 13) focused on Indo-Pacific reefs, showing that there are still many geographical gaps. While eleven escape metrics were identified to evaluate fish escape, flight initiation distance (FID) was the most commonly employed (n = 23). FID was used to study different questions of applied and theoretical ecology, which involved 14 reef fish families. We also used a formal meta-analysis to investigate the effects of fishing by comparing FID inside and outside marine protected areas. Fishes outside MPAs had increased FID compared to those inside MPAs. The Labridae family had a significantly higher effect sizes than Acanthuridae and Epinephelidae, suggesting that fishes in this family may be indicators of effective MPAs using FID. We conclude that protocols aimed to quantify fear in fishes, which provide accurate assessments of fishing effects on fish escape behavior, will help gauge the compliance of marine protected areas.

Small-scale seagrass fisheries can reduce social vulnerability: a comparative case study

Quiros TEAngela L, Beck MW, Araw A, Croll DA, Tershy B. Small-scale seagrass fisheries can reduce social vulnerability: a comparative case study. Ocean & Coastal Management [Internet]. 2018 ;157:56 - 67. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0964569118301145
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Small-scale fisheries are in decline, negatively impacting sources of food and employment for coastal communities. Therefore, we need to assess how biological and socio-economic conditions influence vulnerability, or a community's susceptibility to loss and consequent ability to adapt. We characterized two Philippine fishing communities, Gulod and Buagsong with similar seagrass and fish species composition, and compared their social vulnerability, or pre-existing conditions likely to influence their response to changes in the fishing resource. Using a place-based model of vulnerability, we used household, fisher, landing and underwater surveys to compare their sensitivity and adaptive capacity.

Depending on the scale assessed, each community and group within the community differed in their social vulnerability. The Buagsong community was less socially vulnerable, or less sensitive to pertubations to the seagrass resource because it was closer to a major urban center that provided salaried income. When we assessed seagrass fishers as a group within each community, we found that Gulod fishers had greater adaptive capacity than Buagsong fishers because they diversified their catch, gear types, and income sources. We found catch that comprised the greatest landing biomass did not have the highest market value, and fishers continued to capture high value items at low biomass levels. A third of intertidal gleaners were women, and their participation in the fishery enhanced household adaptive capacity by providing additional food and income, in an otherwise male-dominated fishery.

Our research indicates that community context is not the only determinant of social vulnerability, because groups within the community may decrease their sensitivity, enhance their adaptive capabilities, and ultimately reduce social vulnerability by diversifying income sources, seagrass based catches, and workforces to include women.

Stakeholder perceptions in fisheries management - Sectors with benthic impacts

Soma K, Nielsen JR, Papadopoulou N, Polet H, Zengin M, Smith CJ, Eigaard OR, Sala A, Bonanomi S, van den Burg SWK, et al. Stakeholder perceptions in fisheries management - Sectors with benthic impacts. Marine Policy [Internet]. 2018 ;92:73 - 85. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X17307066
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

The capture fishing sector causes direct and indirect impacts on benthic habitats and associated fauna and flora. Effectiveness of new mitigation measures depends on fishermen's perceptions; their acceptance of, and compliance to, those measures. Accordingly, by means of Advisory Councils (ACs), fisheries stakeholders are encouraged by the Common Fisheries Policy (CFP) reform to contribute to policy formulations. Still, the CFP reform remains unclear about how to possibly incorporate perceptions of specific conservation measures and objectives in practice. Against this background, this article aims at exploring a systematic multi-criteria approach that provides information about stakeholder preferences for objectives reflecting on what is more important to aim for (‘what’), mitigation measures as strategies for reaching their objectives (‘how’), and accountability options that can enhance trust in the people who carry out management (‘who'). The approach applies a pairwise comparison approach to elucidate the stakeholder preferences, and to estimate the relative importance of the different options. It is conducted in the Black Sea, the Mediterranean Sea, the Baltic Sea, and the North Sea. The outcomes of the questionnaire survey succeed in transparently reflecting a diversity of preferences. It is advised that in order to inform the CFP, the ACs develop a user-friendly attractive online version of this approach that can reach multiple stakeholders across Europe and facilitate updates on a continuous basis. In this way the ACs could better facilitate bottom-up participation in fisheries management by representing a wide range of stakeholder perceptions.

Willingness to pay for Beach Ecosystem Services: The case study of three Colombian beaches

Enriquez-Acevedo T, Botero CM, Cantero-Rodelo R, Pertuz A, Suarez A. Willingness to pay for Beach Ecosystem Services: The case study of three Colombian beaches. Ocean & Coastal Management [Internet]. 2018 ;161:96 - 104. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0964569117309778
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

Throughout the scientific literature, beaches have been regarded as very valuable ecosystems for the tourism industry; however, these ecosystems provide multiple direct and indirect benefits beyond tourism. This paper accounts for the results from a Willingness to Pay (WTP) study using data from 425 respondents at three beaches in the Colombian Caribbean Region. Out of the respondents from the three beaches, over 70% expressed a positive WTP to maintain Beach Ecosystem Services (BES) beyond tourism purposes. At two beaches, the payment amount was 3.40 US$/month, while at the third beach the payment amount was 6.80 US$/month. Beach environmental quality seemed to be an important aspect regarding the payment amount. It is highlighted that WTP in beaches did not depend on economic variables such as income or employment, whereas variables related to perception had a determining impact. WTP for BES was defined by interest in environmental issues and concerns about ecosystem services loss. The results offered hereto could provide support to decision makers through quantitative information on social preferences regarding beach improvement projects policies, if several reflections are considered.

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