2018-09-19

Research Priorities to Support Effective Manta and Devil Ray Conservation

Stewart JD, Jaine FRA, Armstrong AJ, Armstrong AO, Bennett MB, Burgess KB, Couturier LIE, Croll DA, Cronin MR, Deakos MH, et al. Research Priorities to Support Effective Manta and Devil Ray Conservation. Frontiers in Marine Science [Internet]. 2018 ;5. Available from: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2018.00314/full
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Manta and devil rays are filter-feeding elasmobranchs that are found circumglobally in tropical and subtropical waters. Although relatively understudied for most of the Twentieth century, public awareness and scientific research on these species has increased dramatically in recent years. Much of this attention has been in response to targeted fisheries, international trade in mobulid products, and a growing concern over the fate of exploited populations. Despite progress in mobulid research, major knowledge gaps still exist, hindering the development of effective management and conservation strategies. We assembled 30 leaders and emerging experts in the fields of mobulid biology, ecology, and conservation to identify pressing knowledge gaps that must be filled to facilitate improved science-based management of these vulnerable species. We highlight focal research topics in the subject areas of taxonomy and diversity, life history, reproduction and nursery areas, population trends, bycatch and fisheries, spatial dynamics and movements, foraging and diving, pollution and contaminants, and sub-lethal impacts. Mobulid rays remain a poorly studied group, and therefore our list of important knowledge gaps is extensive. However, we hope that this identification of high priority knowledge gaps will stimulate and focus future mobulid research.

Current practices and knowledge supporting oil spill risk assessment in the Arctic

Wenning RJ, Robinson H, Bock M, Rempel-Hester MAnn, Gardiner W. Current practices and knowledge supporting oil spill risk assessment in the Arctic. Marine Environmental Research [Internet]. In Press . Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0141113617306773
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Oil spill response (OSR) in the Arctic marine environment conducted as part of operational planning and preparedness supporting exploration and development is most successful when knowledge of the ecosystem is readily available and applicable in an oil spill risk assessment framework. OSR strategies supporting decision-making during the critical period after a spill event should be explicit about the environmental resources potentially at risk and the efficacy of OSR countermeasures that best protect sensitive and valued resources. At present, there are 6 prominent methods for spill impact mitigation assessment (SIMA) in the Arctic aimed at supporting OSR and operational planning and preparedness; each method examines spill scenarios and identifies response strategies best suited to overcome the unique challenges posed by polar ecosystems and to minimize potential long-term environmental consequences. The different methods are grounded in classical environmental risk assessment and the net environmental benefit analysis (NEBA) approach that emerged in the 1990s after the Exxon Valdez oil spill. The different approaches share 5 primary assessment elements (oil physical and chemical properties, fate and transport, exposure, effects and consequence analysis). This paper highlights how the different Arctic methods reflect this common risk assessment framework and share a common need for oil spill science relevant to Arctic ecosystems. An online literature navigation portal, developed as part of the 5-year Arctic Oil Spill Response Technologies Joint Industry Programme, complements the different approaches currently used in the Arctic by capturing the rapidly expanding body of scientific knowledge useful to evaluating exposure, vulnerability and recovery of the Arctic ecosystem after an oil spill.

Noise exposure from commercial shipping for the southern resident killer whale population

Cominelli S, Devillers R, Yurk H, MacGillivray A, McWhinnie L, Canessa R. Noise exposure from commercial shipping for the southern resident killer whale population. Marine Pollution Bulletin [Internet]. 2018 ;136:177 - 200. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025326X18306209
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

This study assesses vessel-noise exposure levels for Southern Resident Killer Whales (SRKW) in the Salish Sea. Kernel Density Estimation (KDE) was used to delineate SRKW summer core areas. Those areas were combined with the output of a regional cumulative noise model describing sound level variations generated by commercial vessels (1/3-octave-bands from 10 Hz to 63.1 kHz). Cumulative distribution functions were used to evaluate SRKW's noise exposure from 15 vessel categories over three zones located within the KDE. Median cumulative noise values were used to group categories based on the associated exposure levels. Ferries, Tugboats, Vehicle Carriers, Recreational Vessels, Containers, and Bulkers showed high levels of exposure (Leq−50th > 90 dB re 1 μPa) within SRKW core areas. Management actions aiming at reducing SRKW noise exposure during the summer should target the abovementioned categories and take into consideration the spatial distribution of their levels of exposure, their mechanical and their operational characteristics.

An Indigenous approach to ocean planning and policy in the Bering Strait region of Alaska

Raymond-Yakoubian J, Daniel R. An Indigenous approach to ocean planning and policy in the Bering Strait region of Alaska. Marine Policy [Internet]. 2018 ;97:101 - 108. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X18300113
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Bringing western science and policy together with Traditional Knowledge and values from indigenous communities for ocean planning is lacking and a framework is needed. This article articulates indigenous perspectives about the ocean and a culturally appropriate methodology developed in the Bering Strait region for a visioning process that can be used to bridge western and indigenous value systems. Recommendations for an indigenous approach focused on inclusion, the examination of values, adequate representation, and Tribal direction in ocean planning and policy are made. This approach is needed to move forward on a path to achieving more equitable, sustainable and inclusive ocean planning for the future.

The myth of the poor fisher: Evidence from the Nordic countries

Nielsen M, Asche F, Bergesen O, Blomquist J, Henriksen E, Hoff A, Nielsen R, Viðarsson JR, Waldo S. The myth of the poor fisher: Evidence from the Nordic countries. Marine Policy [Internet]. 2018 ;93:186 - 194. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X17306693
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

Fishers are often perceived to be poor, and low income levels are used to justify subsidies and other types of direct and indirect income support to maintain coastal communities. In this study fishers’ income levels are investigated in four Nordic countries; Denmark, Iceland, Norway and Sweden for different types of fishers and vessels and in comparison to alternative occupations. The most important result is that fishers in these countries are doing relatively well, and only in Sweden is the fishers’ average income level below the average national income. Within the fleets, there are substantial differences. Owners of coastal vessels tend to have the lowest income, and also lower than crews. Owners as well as crews on larger vessels tend to do much better and in the largest fishing nations, Iceland and Norway, they do especially well.

Research advances and gaps in marine planning: towards a global database in systematic conservation planning

Álvarez-Romero JG, Mills M, Adams VM, Gurney GG, Pressey RL, Weeks R, Ban NC, Cheok J, Davies TE, Day JC, et al. Research advances and gaps in marine planning: towards a global database in systematic conservation planning. Biological Conservation [Internet]. 2018 . Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006320717311114
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

Systematic conservation planning (SCP) has increasingly been used to prioritize conservation actions, including the design of new protected areas to achieve conservation objectives. Over the last 10 years, the number of marine SCP studies has increased exponentially, yet there is no structured or reliable way to find information on methods, trends, and progress. The rapid growth in methods and marine applications warrants an updated analysis of the literature, as well as reflection on the need for continuous and systematic documentation of SCP exercises in general. To address these gaps, we developed a database to document SCP exercises and populated it with 155 marine SCP exercises found in the primary literature. Based on our review, we provide an update on global advances and trends in marine SCP literature. We found accelerating growth in the number of studies over the past decade, with increasing consideration of socioeconomic variables, land-sea planning, and ecological connectivity. While several studies aimed to inform conservation decisions, we found little evidence of input from practitioners. There are important gaps in geographic coverage and little correspondence with areas most threatened. Five countries lead most studies, but their networks suggest potential for capacity building through collaborations. The varying quality and detail in documentation of studies confirmed the limited opportunities to develop and assess the application of best practice in conservation planning. A global database to track the development, implementation, and impact of SCP applications can thus provide numerous benefits. Our database constitutes an important step towards the development of a centralized repository of information on planning exercises and can serve several roles to advance SCP theory and practice: it facilitates assessing geographic coverage and gaps; scientists and practitioners can access information to identify trends in the use of data, methods, and tools; reviewers and editors of journals can assess whether studies have covered important literature and developments; donors and non-government organizations can identify regions needing further work; and practitioners and policy-makers can learn from previous plans.

The effect of ocean acidification on tropical coral calcification: Insights from calcification fluid DIC chemistry

Allison N, Cole C, Hintz C, Hintz K, Rae J, Finch A. The effect of ocean acidification on tropical coral calcification: Insights from calcification fluid DIC chemistry. Chemical Geology [Internet]. 2018 . Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0009254118304443
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Ocean acidification typically reduces calcification in tropical marine corals but the mechanism for this process is not understood. We use skeletal boron geochemistry (B/Ca and δ11B) to reconstruct the calcification fluid DIC of corals cultured over both high and low seawater pCO2 (180, 400 and 750 μatm). We observe strong positive correlations between calcification fluid pH and concentrations of the DIC species potentially implicated in aragonite precipitation (be they CO32−, HCO3 or HCO3 + CO32−). Similarly, with the exception of one outlier, the fluid concentrations of precipitating DIC species are strongly positively correlated with coral calcification rate. Corals cultured at high seawater pCO2usually have low calcification fluid pH and low concentrations of precipitating DIC, suggesting that a reduction in DIC substrate at the calcification site is responsible for decreased calcification. The outlier coral maintained high pHCF and DICCF at high seawater pCO2 but exhibited a reduced calcification rate indicating that the coral has a limited energy budget to support proton extrusion from the calcification fluid and meet other calcification demands. We find no evidence that increasing seawater pCO2 enhances diffusion of CO2into the calcification site. Instead the overlying [CO2] available to diffuse into the calcification site appears broadly comparable between seawater pCO2 treatments, implying that metabolic activity (respiration and photosynthesis) generates a similar [CO2] in the vicinity of the calcification site regardless of seawater pCO2.

A Deep learning method for accurate and fast identification of coral reef fishes in underwater images

Villon S, Mouillot D, Chaumont M, Darling ES, Subsol G, Claverie T, Villéger S. A Deep learning method for accurate and fast identification of coral reef fishes in underwater images. Ecological Informatics [Internet]. In Press . Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1574954118300694
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Identifying and counting fish individuals on photos and videos is a crucial task to cost-effectively monitor marine biodiversity, yet it remains difficult and time-consuming. In this paper, we present a method to assist the identification of fish species on underwater images, and we compare our model performances to human ability in terms of speed and accuracy. We first tested the performance of a convolutional neural network (CNN) trained with different photographic databases while accounting for different post-processing decision rules to identify 20 fish species. Finally, we compared the performance of species identification of our best CNN model with that of humans on a test database of 1197 fish images representing nine species. The best CNN was the one trained with 900,000 images including (i) whole fish bodies, (ii) partial fish bodies and (iii) the environment (e.g. reef bottom or water). The rate of correct identification was 94.9%, greater than the rate of correct identification by humans (89.3%). The CNN was also able to identify fish individuals partially hidden behind corals or behind other fish and was more effective than humans to identify fish on smallest or blurry images while humans were better to identify fish individuals in unusual positions (e.g. twisted body). On average, each identification by our best CNN using a common hardware took 0.06 s. Deep Learning methods can thus perform efficient fish identification on underwater images and offer promises to build-up new video-based protocols for monitoring fish biodiversity cheaply and effectively.

Drone Up! Quantifying Whale Behavior From a New Perspective Improves Observational Capacity

Torres LG, Nieukirk SL, Lemos L, Chandler TE. Drone Up! Quantifying Whale Behavior From a New Perspective Improves Observational Capacity. Frontiers in Marine Science [Internet]. 2018 ;5. Available from: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2018.00319/full
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

During traditional boat-based surveys of marine megafauna, behavioral observations are typically limited to records of animal surfacings obtained from a horizontal perspective. Achieving an aerial perspective has been restricted to brief helicopter or airplane based observations that are costly, noisy, and risky. The emergence of commercial small unmanned aerial systems (UAS) has significantly reduced these constraints to provide a stable, relatively quiet, and inexpensive platform that enables replicate observations for prolonged periods with minimal disturbance. The potential of UAS for behavioral observation appears immense, yet quantitative proof of utility as an observational tool is required. We use UAS footage of gray whales foraging in the coastal waters of Oregon, United States to develop video behavior analysis methods, determine the change in observation time enabled by UAS, and describe unique behaviors observed via UAS. Boat-based behavioral observations from 53 gray whale sightings between May and October 2016 were compared to behavioral data extracted from video analysis of UAS flights during those sightings. We used a DJI Phantom 3 Pro or 4 Advanced, recorded video from an altitude ≥25 m, and detected no behavioral response by whales to the UAS. Two experienced whale ethologists conducted UAS video behavioral analysis, including tabulation of whale behavior states and events, and whale surface time and whale visible time (total time the whale was visible including underwater). UAS provided three times more observational capacity than boat-based observations alone (300 vs. 103 min). When observation time is accounted for, UAS data provided more and longer observations of all primary behavior states (travel, forage, social, and rest) relative to boat-based data, especially foraging. Furthermore, UAS enable documentation of multiple novel gray whale foraging tactics (e.g., headstands: n = 58; side-swimming: n = 17; jaw snapping and flexing: n = 10) and 33 social events (nursing and pair coordinated surfacings) not identified from boat-based observation. This study demonstrates the significant added value of UAS to marine megafauna behavior and ecological studies. With technological advances, robust study designs, and effective analytical tools, we foresee increased UAS applications to marine megafauna studies to elucidate foraging strategies, habitat associations, social patterns, and response to human disturbance.

Mercury concentrations in muscles and liver tissues of Cape monkfish (Lophius vomerinus) from the Northern Benguela, Namibia

Erasmus VNdinelago, Hamutenya S, Iitembu JAngala, Gamatham JCharles. Mercury concentrations in muscles and liver tissues of Cape monkfish (Lophius vomerinus) from the Northern Benguela, Namibia. Marine Pollution Bulletin [Internet]. 2018 ;135:1101 - 1106. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025326X18306015
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Cape monkfish (Lophius vomerinus) is one of the long-lived species and top predators in the northern Benguela region. Studies on bioaccumulation of mercury (Hg) in cape monkfish are limited. This study compared the total Hg concentration between monkfish muscle and liver tissue; and related the monkfish total Hg concentrations to fish body size and capture locations (depth and latitude). Monkfish specimens (n = 529) were collected from 2016 to 2018. The mean total Hg concentration was 0.126 ± 0.005 mg/kg in muscle tissues and 0.106 ± 0.005 mg/kg in liver tissues. No significant differences were observed between total Hg concentrations of muscles and liver tissues. Differences in Hg concentrations between monkfish length classes were observed. No significant correlation was found between total Hg concentrations and latitude. A significant increase of total Hg concentration with the depth was observed. The concentrations of Hg were below the World Health Organization (WHO limits for fish (0.5 mg/kg).

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