2019-01-09

Microplastics are ubiquitous on California beaches and enter the coastal food web through consumption by Pacific mole crabs

Horn D, Miller M, Anderson S, Steele C. Microplastics are ubiquitous on California beaches and enter the coastal food web through consumption by Pacific mole crabs. Marine Pollution Bulletin [Internet]. 2019 ;139:231 - 237. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025326X18308907
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Microplastics are commonly found in marine ecosystems, but their distribution, prevalence, and impacts on resident fauna are still not well understood. Microplastics in coastal sediments expose invertebrate infauna to the risk of ingestion of plastic debris and associated toxicants. We assessed the prevalence of microplastics in beach sediments and ingested by Pacific mole crabs (Emerita analoga) at sandy beaches spanning >900 km of the California coast. Microplastics were present in sediments of every one of 51 beaches sampled. At a subset of 38 beaches Pacific mole crabs were collected and crabs at every beach had ingested microplastics. Across all beaches sampled, an average of 35% of Pacific mole crabs examined had microplastics in their guts. Our study demonstrates that microplastics are ubiquitous in sediments on California beaches and they are frequently consumed by a filter-feeding crustacean that is a common prey item in the diet of a wide variety of taxa, including fishes and birds.

Contribution of individual rivers to Great Barrier Reef nitrogen exposure with implications for management prioritization

Wolff NH, da Silva ETeixeira, Devlin M, Anthony KRN, Lewis S, Tonin H, Brinkman R, Mumby PJ. Contribution of individual rivers to Great Barrier Reef nitrogen exposure with implications for management prioritization. Marine Pollution Bulletin [Internet]. 2018 ;133:30 - 43. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025326X18302996
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) runoff from Great Barrier Reef (GBR) catchments is a threat to coral reef health. Several initiatives address this threat, including the Australian Government's Reef 2050 Plan. However, environmental decision makers face an unsolved prioritization challenge: determining the exposure of reefs to DIN from individual rivers. Here, we use virtual river tracers embedded within a GBR-wide hydrodynamic model to resolve the spatial and temporal dynamics of 16 individual river plumes during three wet seasons (2011−2013). We then used in-situ DIN observations to calibrate tracer values, allowing us to estimate the contribution of each river to reef-scale DIN exposure during each season. Results indicate that the Burdekin, Fitzroy, Tully and Daintree rivers pose the greatest DIN exposure risk to coral reefs during the three seasons examined. Results were used to demonstrate a decision support framework that combines reef exposure risk with river dominance (threat diversity).

How important are maritime emissions for the air quality: At European and national scale

Monteiro A, Russo M, Gama C, Borrego C. How important are maritime emissions for the air quality: At European and national scale. Environmental Pollution [Internet]. 2018 ;242:565 - 575. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S026974911830962X
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

Due to its dependence on fossil fuel combustion, emissions from the marine transport sector can significantly contribute to air pollution. This work aims to evaluate the impact of maritime transport emissions on air quality in Portugal using a numerical air quality modelling approach, with high-resolution emission data. Emissions from the European TNO inventory were compiled and pre-processed at hourly and high spatial (∼3 × 3 km2) resolutions. Scenarios with and without these maritime emissions were then simulated with the WRF-CHIMERE modelling system, extensively tested and validated for Portugal domain, in order to evaluate their impact on air quality. A simulation was performed for one year (2016) and the resulting differences were analysed in terms of spatial distribution, time series and deltas. The main deltas for NO2 and PM10 are located over international shipping routes and major ports, while O3 concentrations are impacted in a larger area. The modelling results also indicate that shipping emissions are responsible for deltas in the concentration of NO2higher than 20% over specific urban areas located in the west coast of Portugal, and less than 5% for PM10. For O3 the relative contribution is low (around 2%) but this contribution is also observed at locations more than 50 km from the coast.

From voluntary commitments to ocean sustainability

Neumann B, Unger S. From voluntary commitments to ocean sustainability. Science [Internet]. 2019 ;363(6422):35 - 36. Available from: http://science.sciencemag.org/content/363/6422/35
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $30.00
Type: Journal Article

Voluntary commitments by states, governmental or nongovernmental organizations, and other actors, aiming to deliver outcome-oriented activities, have become a well-recognized mechanism in international sustainability policy (13). For ocean governance, the calling for and pledging of voluntary commitments could become a game changer, with two major international processes harnessing such voluntary contributions in recent years: the Our Ocean conferences, an annual high-level series initiated by U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry in 2014, and the United Nations (UN) Ocean Conference, which took place for the first time in June 2017. Such calls and commitments provide opportunities to raise awareness, promote engagement, and catalyze political will for action on the part of states as well as public and private sectors. However, without effective and transparent review systems, it is difficult to link pledged commitments to actual implementation. Quality control and ensuring that commitments are effective and impactful will be difficult to achieve. A uniform global process is required to register and assess commitments, including consistent reporting and monitoring systems with clear targets, baselines, and review systems.

First observation of the courtship behaviour of the giant devil ray Mobula mobular (Myliobatiformes: Mobulidae)

Duffy CAJ, Tindale SC. First observation of the courtship behaviour of the giant devil ray Mobula mobular (Myliobatiformes: Mobulidae). New Zealand Journal of Zoology [Internet]. 2018 ;45(4):387 - 394. Available from: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03014223.2017.1410850
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $50.00
Type: Journal Article

Courtship behaviour of the giant devil ray Mobula mobular is described from northern New Zealand, temperate southwest Pacific Ocean, for the first time. A mating train consisting of a full-term pregnant female and up to four males was observed over a period of 147 minutes. Their behaviour was similar to courtship behaviour observed in other large mobulids. Biting of the female was not observed, possibly due to the female’s use of the surface to prevent males positioning themselves above her. However, the lead male pressed the female’s abdomen and underside each time the female reached or stopped at the surface. The occurrence of pregnant females and mating behaviour off northern North Island confirms breeding occurs in New Zealand waters.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - 2019-01-09