2019-04-10

Strategising stakeholder empowerment for effective co-management within fishery-based commons

Freeman ERobert, Civera C, Cortese D, Fiandrino S. Strategising stakeholder empowerment for effective co-management within fishery-based commons. British Food Journal [Internet]. 2018 ;120(11):2631 - 2644. Available from: https://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/pdfplus/10.1108/BFJ-01-2018-0041
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $32.00
Type: Journal Article
Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to link empowerment to the engagement of low-power stakeholders in the context of marine protected areas (MPAs) to suggest how empowerment-based engagement can be strategised to prevent and overcome management crises within a natural common good and ultimately achieve effective co-management.

Design/methodology/approach

This research employs a longitudinal case study methodology. The subject of the study is Torre Guaceto MPA, a natural common good, internationally recognised as a best practice of co-management.

Findings

The case study illustrates specific empowerment areas and actions that help move low-power stakeholders to higher levels of engagement to achieve effective co-management. It also suggests that the main strategic implication of empowerment-based engagement is the creation of empowered stakeholders who can serve as catalysts for sustaining the common through the development of entrepreneurial skills that satisfy joint interests.

Research limitations/implications

The applied methodology of a single case and the peculiar conditions intrinsic to this case can be overcome via the inclusion and comparison of other similar commons.

Practical implications

The study provides a stakeholder management model of empowerment-based engagement that offers concrete evidence of empowerment strategies that can be adopted and adapted by the management of similar natural common goods.

Originality/value

The research fills the literature gaps related to understanding the antecedents of engagement and its strategic implications within natural common pool resources.

Key coastal landscape structures for resilient coastal green infrastructure to enhance the abundance of migratory birds on the Yellow Sea

Kim M, Choi YEui, Chon J. Key coastal landscape structures for resilient coastal green infrastructure to enhance the abundance of migratory birds on the Yellow Sea. Environmental Pollution [Internet]. 2018 ;243:1617 - 1628. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0269749118301659
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

The aim of this study was to investigate the key landscape structures of migratory bird habitats that affect abundance of migratory birds to promote resilient coastal green infrastructure planning on the Yellow Sea coast. We classified coastal areas into four watersheds of South Korea and conducted multivariate regression analysis between migratory bird populations and landscape structures including total class area (CA), patch area distribution (MN), patch density (PD), and edge density (ED). At the national level, sandbank MN, sandbank CA, water ED, and grasslands were derived as key landscape structures affecting the abundance of migratory birds. At the watershed level, key landscape structures were determined as follows: Urban area_MN for the Han River watershed, rice paddy MN for the Asan watershed, rice paddy CA for Saemangeum, and grassland MN for the Youngsan River watershed. Considering the multifunctionality, redundancy, and connectivity of the resilience strategy, we provide specific coastal infrastructure planning recommendations at the national and watershed scales.

Official catch data underrepresent shark and ray taxa caught in Mediterranean and Black Sea fisheries

Cashion MS, Bailly N, Pauly D. Official catch data underrepresent shark and ray taxa caught in Mediterranean and Black Sea fisheries. Marine Policy [Internet]. 2019 ;105:1 - 9. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X18303099
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

One in four fishes of the subclass Elasmobranchii (sharks and rays) is estimated to be threatened with extinction, according to the IUCN Red List. Their primary threat is overfishing, but data deficiency makes stock assessment difficult. Over 50% of shark and ray species are listed as Data Deficient, in part because the taxonomic resolution of existing catch statistics is too low to identify species-level trends of abundance. Less than 25% of the shark catch reported to the FAO is identified below the genus level; the other 75% is lumped into categories such as “sharks”, “rays”, or “elasmobranchs nei”, (not elsewhere included). This study evaluates the taxonomic resolution of domestic elasmobranch landings in the Mediterranean and Black Seas, where over half of shark and ray species are threatened with extinction, but data deficiency and ambiguity consistently limit conservation action. A Taxonomic Resolution Index (TRI) was calculated for the landings of 24 countries over 65 years (1950–2014) to evaluate the quality of catch reporting over time. The TRI revealed that less than a quarter of commercial elasmobranch taxa are represented in Mediterranean and Black Seas landings data, and reporting quality has hardly improved. Conservation and management policy exists for effective fisheries data collection in the Mediterranean and Black Seas, but lacks implementation.

Scaling Up Coral Reef Restoration Using Remote Sensing Technology

Foo SA, Asner GP. Scaling Up Coral Reef Restoration Using Remote Sensing Technology. Frontiers in Marine Science [Internet]. 2019 ;6. Available from: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2019.00079/full
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Coral reefs face an uncertain future and may not recover naturally from anthropogenic climate change. Coral restoration is needed to rehabilitate degraded reefs and to sustain biodiversity. There is a need for baseline data on global reef distribution, composition, and condition to provide targets for conservation and restoration. Remote sensing can address this issue and is currently underutilized in reef research and restoration. This synthesis integrates current capabilities of remote sensing with key reef restoration criteria, to facilitate coral restoration success. Research into the development of a spectral database for corals, linking habitat type and extent with predator abundance, and identification of species-specific acoustic signatures are needed to advance the use of remote sensing in reef restoration design and monitoring. Reciprocally, reef restoration efforts should innovate at ecosystem, regional, and global levels using remote sensing, to preserve as much of the coral reef biome as possible with continued ocean-climate change.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - 2019-04-10