2019-06-12

Ingestion of microplastics by fish and other prey organisms of cetaceans, exemplified for two large baleen whale species

Burkhardt-Holm P, N'Guyen A. Ingestion of microplastics by fish and other prey organisms of cetaceans, exemplified for two large baleen whale species. Marine Pollution Bulletin [Internet]. 2019 ;144:224 - 234. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025326X19303479?dgcid=raven_sd_search_email
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Knowledge on microplastic (MP) ingestion by cetaceans is difficult to obtain. We infer the potential for MP uptake by cetaceans from the occurrence of MP in prey species. First, we reviewed information on whale prey species, focussing on common minke (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) and sei whale (Bborealis), for which the most comprehensive quantitative datasets exist. Second, evidence of MP ingestion by their prey species was reviewed. We found common minke whales forageopportunistically on fish from various families: AmmodytidaeClupeidaeGadidaeEngraulidae and Osmeridae. Sei whales mostly feed on copepods, Engraulidae, Clupeidae and Scombridae. High levels of MP contamination are reported for Scombridae in the Atlantic and Engraulidae in the Northwest Pacific Ocean. Copepods exhibit low levels of MP ingestion in the Northeast Pacific Ocean. Species-specific prey preferences and feeding strategies imply different cetaceans have varied potential for MP uptake, even if they feed in similar geographic areas.

Environmental Issues of Deep-Sea Mining - Deep-Sea Natural Capital: Putting Deep-Sea Economic Activities into an Environmental Context

Thiele T. Environmental Issues of Deep-Sea Mining - Deep-Sea Natural Capital: Putting Deep-Sea Economic Activities into an Environmental Context. In: Sharma R Cham: Springer International Publishing; 2019. pp. 507 - 518. Available from: https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-030-12696-4_18
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $29.95
Type: Book Chapter

The natural capital of the vast deep ocean is significant yet not well quantified. The ecosystem services provided by the deep sea provide a wide range of benefits to humanity. Proposed deep-sea economic activities such as fishing, deep-sea mining and bioprospecting therefore need to be assessed in this context. In addition to quantifying the economic benefits and costs of such activities on their own, their potential impact on the deep-sea natural capital also needs to be considered.

This article describes such a natural capital approach, identifies relevant ecosystem services and looks at how a range of proposed commercial activities could be assessed in this context. It suggests a methodology for such analysis and suggests an approach to a sustainable blue deep-sea economy that is consistent with environmental precaution. It will close with suggestions of how potential risks can best be handled.

The article aims to show that modern environmental economics based on natural capital can provide a useful framework for deciding future deep-sea efforts.

The difference in development level of marine shellfish industry in 10 major producing countries

Peng D, Hou X, Li Y, Mu Y. The difference in development level of marine shellfish industry in 10 major producing countries. Marine Policy [Internet]. In Press :103516. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X18308807
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Using the production and trade data of marine shellfish extracted from the database of FishStatJ, this study aims to i) measure development level (DL) of the marine shellfish industry (MSI) in 10 major producing countries by the TOPSIS model; ii) classify the MSI into different classes in term of the results from the above measurement; and iii) identify, by the variation coefficient, how DL of the MSI in the 10 countries was changing during the period of 1997–2016.

The results of the TOSIS analysis indicate that, by the relative closeness and the number of turning points, the 10 countries can be divided into three types, i.e., with no change (China and Thailand); with little change and in a gradual way (Japan, Canada, France, Spain and Italy); and with a dramatical change (USA, Chile and South Korea). In term of the mean of relative closeness, the 10 countries can be divided into four classes, i.e., excellent (class I), good (class II), weak (class III), and poor (class IV), with China being in class I, USA, Japan and Canada in class II, France, Chile, Spain and South Korea in class III, and Italy and Thailand in class IV.

The results of the variation coefficient analysis suggest that the difference in DL of the 10 countries’ MSI increased over the past 20 years. In particular, the difference among the developing countries increased significantly, while those between the developed countries shrank slightly.

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