Literature Library

Currently indexing 8094 titles

Electric clothes dryers: An underestimated source of microfiber pollution

Kapp KJ, Miller RZ. Electric clothes dryers: An underestimated source of microfiber pollution Mukherjee A. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2020 ;15(10):e0239165. Available from: https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0239165
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Microplastics, particularly microfibers, are ubiquitous, found in aquatic (freshwater and marine) and terrestrial environments and within the food web worldwide. It is well-established that microplastics in the form of textile fibers enter the environment via washing machines and wastewater treatment effluent. Less is known about the release of microfibers from electric clothes dryers. In this study we measure microfiber emissions from home installed dryers at two different sites. At each site the distribution of fibers landing on the snow’s surface outside dryer vents and the weight of lint in dryer exhaust exiting dryer vents were measured. Fibers from the pink polyester fleece blankets used in this study were found in plots throughout a 30ft (9.14m) radius from the dryer vents, with an average number across all plots of 404 ± 192 (SD) (Site 1) and 1,169 ± 606 (SD) (Site 2). The majority of the fibers collected were located within 5 ft (1.52m) of the vents. Averages of 35 ± 16(SD)mg (Site 1) and 70 ± 77 (SD)mg (Site 2) of lint from three consecutive dry cycles were collected from dryer vent exhaust. This study establishes that electric clothes dryers emit masses of microfiber directly into the environment. Microfiber emissions vary based on dryer type, age, vent installation and lint trap characteristics. Therefore, dryers should be included in discussions when considering strategies, policies and innovations to prevent and mitigate microfiber pollution.

Identifying spatial patterns and interactions among multiple ecosystem services in an urban mangrove landscape

I JBerhane Al, Richards DRex, Gaw LYan-Feng, Masoudi M, Nathan Y, Friess DA. Identifying spatial patterns and interactions among multiple ecosystem services in an urban mangrove landscape. Ecological Indicators [Internet]. 2021 ;121:107042. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1470160X2030981X?dgcid=raven_sd_search_email
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

As urbanisation pressures on ecosystems are set to increase, trade-offs between ecosystem service are also likely to increase. Management strategies that minimise trade-offs and promote sustainable development to optimise ecosystem multi-functionality are therefore needed. Many coastal cities may however struggle to find the resources and capacity to operationalise ecosystem service agendas. Therefore, the objective of this study is to propose and test the suitability of a multi-functional landscape approach to ecosystem service assessments using the case study of Singapore, with focus on five ecosystem services: water and air pollution control, global climate, local temperature and recreational potential services. Our results show clear heterogeneity in the capacity of mangroves to supply different ecosystem services, with a general tendency for greater amounts of supply in larger mangrove patches, and for ecosystem services to aggregate producing hotspots of supply. Overall, a 24% of the mangrove landscape supported aggregations of at least one, two or three ecosystem services, but only <1% of the mangrove landscape supporting overlapping aggregations of all five services. Ecosystem services also co-varied to produce trade-offs and synergies, with ecosystem service bundling largely driven by regulating services. Areas of ecosystem service synergy and hotsport overlap represent possible priority areas of future conservation or management, and highlight what might be lost if significant degradation were allowed to occur. Further, the large spatial mismatch among ecosystem service hotspots also highlights the difficulty in identifying single areas capable of delivering substantial amounts of multiple ecosystem services. We conclude that this framework provides a basis to look at ecosystem services in combination, as well as individually, and to do so in a spatially explicit manner than can be overlaid with maps of land use or other development planning.

Recent fishing footprint of the high-seas bottom trawl fisheries on the Northwestern Hawaiian Ridge and Emperor Seamount Chain: A finer-scale approach to a large-scale issue

Morgan NB, Baco AR. Recent fishing footprint of the high-seas bottom trawl fisheries on the Northwestern Hawaiian Ridge and Emperor Seamount Chain: A finer-scale approach to a large-scale issue. Ecological Indicators [Internet]. 2021 ;121:107051. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1470160X20309900?dgcid=raven_sd_search_email
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

A standing data gap for management of high-seas seamounts of the Northwestern Hawaiian Ridge and Emperor Seamounts (ES-NHR) by the North Pacific Fisheries Commission is the footprint of fisheries activities on these seamounts. Using satellite AIS data and the algorithms of the publicly available Global Fishing Watch database, a spatial map of trawling in a 0.01-degree latitude by 0.01-degree longitude square grid was created to review the data available to map this footprint. From 2012 to 2018 much of the trawling effort for all countries focused on Koko, Yuryaku, Kammu, and Colahan Seamounts at depths between 400 m (summits) and the depth limit currently set by the North Pacific Fisheries Commission of 1500 m. Additional seamounts with fishing activity included Annei (North Koko), Kinmei, Jingu, and Suiko. The remaining ES-NHR seamount locations show no trawling in those years. Bottom contact fishing was predominately carried out by ships with flag states of Japan and Korea. To date there appears to be compliance with the recent small-scale closures on C–H seamount and Koko.

An additional source of data comes from scientific Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) surveys in 2014 and 2015 from three of these seamounts, in which scars from bottom contact gear are readily visible. These cover a smaller spatial area and depth range than the satellite data, but indicate the full footprint is not encompassed by the satellite data, suggesting either the fishing footprint is not fully captured by the AIS approach or that the footprint has shifted through time. AUV surveys also provide data on areas where abundant megafauna occur, which can provide candidate starting points for VME management efforts and further closures, similar to ones already in effect in the ES-NHR. The combination of satellite and AUV data provide a finer-scale fisheries footprint for this region that can aid in management of these sites.

The potential of coastal ecosystems to mitigate the impact of sea-level rise in shallow tropical bays

Keyzer LM, Herman PMJ, Smits BP, Pietrzak JD, James RK, Candy AS, Riva REM, Bouma TJ, van der Boog CG, Katsman CA, et al. The potential of coastal ecosystems to mitigate the impact of sea-level rise in shallow tropical bays. Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science [Internet]. 2020 ;246:107050. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0272771420307812?dgcid=raven_sd_search_email
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Shallow tropical bays in the Caribbean, like Orient Bay and Galion Bay in Saint Martin, are often sheltered by coral reefs. In the relatively calm environment behind the reefs, seagrass meadows grow. Together, these ecosystems provide valuable ecosystem services like coastal protection, biodiversity hotspots, nursery grounds for animals and enhancing tourism and fisheries. However, sea-level rise imperils these ecosystems and the services they provide because of changing hydrodynamic conditions, with potential effects on the interdependencies between these ecosystems. By means of a hydrodynamic model that accounts for the interaction with vegetation (Delft3D Flexible Mesh), the impact of sea-level rise (0.87 m in 2100) is investigated for three scenarios of future reef development (i.e. keep-up, give-up and catch-up). If coral reefs cannot keep up with sea-level rise, the wave height and flow velocity increase significantly within associated bays, with the wave height doubling locally in case of eroding reefs in our model simulations. Since the presence of seagrass strongly depends on the hydrodynamic conditions, the response of seagrass to the future hydrodynamic conditions is projected using a habitat suitability model that is based on a logistic regression. The spatial character of the bays determines the response of seagrass. In Orient Bay, which is deeper and partly exposed to higher waves, the seagrass will likely migrate from the deeper parts to shallow areas that become suitable for seagrass because of the surf zone moving landward. In contrast, the conditions for seagrass worsen in Galion Bay for the catch-up and give-up scenario; due to the shallowness of this bay, the seagrass cannot escape to more suitable areas, resulting in significant seagrass loss. It is shown that healthy coastal ecosystems are able to limit the change in hydrodynamic conditions due to sea-level rise. Therefore, preserving these ecosystems is key for ensuring the resilience of shallow tropical bays to sea-level rise and maintaining their ecosystem services.

How to Deal With Seafloor Marine Litter: An Overview of the State-of-the-Art and Future Perspectives

Madricardo F, Ghezzo M, Nesto N, Kiver WJoseph Mc, Faussone GClaudio, Fiorin R, Riccato F, Mackelworth PCharles, Basta J, De Pascalis F, et al. How to Deal With Seafloor Marine Litter: An Overview of the State-of-the-Art and Future Perspectives. Frontiers in Marine Science [Internet]. 2020 ;7. Available from: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2020.505134/full?utm_source=F-AAE&utm_medium=EMLF&utm_campaign=MRK_1452864_45_Marine_20201008_arts_A
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Marine litter is a significant and growing pollutant in the oceans. In recent years, the number of studies and initiatives trying to assess and tackle the global threat of marine litter has grown exponentially. Most of these studies, when considering macro-litter, focus on floating or stranded litter, whereas there is less information available about marine litter on the seabed. The aim of this article is to give an overview of the current state-of-the-art methods to address the issue of seafloor macro-litter pollution. The overview includes the following topics: the monitoring of macro-litter on the seafloor, the identification of possible litter accumulation hot spots on the seafloor through numerical models, and seafloor litter management approaches (from removal protocols to recycling processes). The article briefly analyzes the different approaches to involve stakeholders, since the marine litter topic is strongly related to the societal engagement. Finally, attempting to answer to all the critical aspects highlighted in the overview, the article highlights the need of innovative multi-level solutions to induce a change toward sustainable practices, transforming a problem into a real circular economy opportunity.

Impacts of Marine Litter on Mediterranean Reef Systems: From Shallow to Deep Waters

Angiolillo M, Fortibuoni T. Impacts of Marine Litter on Mediterranean Reef Systems: From Shallow to Deep Waters. Frontiers in Marine Science [Internet]. 2020 ;7. Available from: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2020.581966/full?utm_source=F-AAE&utm_medium=EMLF&utm_campaign=MRK_1452864_45_Marine_20201008_arts_A
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Biogenic reefs are known worldwide to play a key role in benthic ecosystems, enhancing biodiversity and ecosystem functioning at every level, from shallow to deeper waters. Unfortunately, several stressors threaten these vulnerable systems. The widespread presence of marine litter represents one of these. The harmful effects of marine litter on several organisms are known so far. However, only in the last decade, there was increasingly scientific and public attention on the impacts on reef organisms and habitats caused by litter accumulating on the seafloor. This review aims to synthesize literature and discuss the state of current knowledge on the interactions between marine litter and reef organisms in a strongly polluted basin, the Mediterranean Sea. The multiple impacts (e.g., entanglement, ghost-fishing, coverage, etc.) of litter on reef systems, the list of species impacted, and the main litter categories were identified, and a map of the knowledge available so far on this topic was provided. Seventy-eight taxa resulted impacted by marine litter on Mediterranean reefs, and the majority belonged to the phylum Cnidaria (41%), including endangered species like the red coral (Corallium rubrum) and the madrepora coral (Madrepora oculata). Entanglement, caused mainly by abandoned, lost, or otherwise discarded fishing gear (ALDFG), was the most frequent impact, playing a detrimental effect mainly on coralligenous arborescent species and cold-water corals (CWCs). The information was spatially heterogeneous, with some areas almost uncovered by scientific studies (e.g., the Aegean-Levantine Sea and the Southern Mediterranean Sea). Although many legal and policy frameworks have been established to tackle this issue [e.g., marine strategy framework directive (MSFD) and the Barcelona Convention], several gaps still exist concerning the assessment of the impact of marine litter on marine organisms, and in particular on reefs. There is a need for harmonized and standardized monitoring protocols for the collection of quantitative data to assess the impact of litter on reefs and animal forests. At the same time, urgent management measures limiting, for instance, the impact of ALDFG and other marine litter are needed to preserve these valuable and vulnerable marine ecosystems.

The Fate of Deep-Sea Coral Reefs on Seamounts in a Fishery-Seascape: What Are the Impacts, What Remains, and What Is Protected?

Williams A, Althaus F, Maguire K, Green M, Untiedt C, Alderslade P, Clark MR, Bax N, Schlacher TA. The Fate of Deep-Sea Coral Reefs on Seamounts in a Fishery-Seascape: What Are the Impacts, What Remains, and What Is Protected?. Frontiers in Marine Science [Internet]. 2020 ;7. Available from: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2020.567002/full?utm_source=F-AAE&utm_medium=EMLF&utm_campaign=MRK_1452864_45_Marine_20201008_arts_A
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Environmental harm to deep-sea coral reefs on seamounts is widely attributed to bottom trawl fishing. Yet, accurate diagnoses of impacts truly caused by trawling are surprisingly rare. Similarly, comprehensive regional assessments of fishing damage rarely exist, impeding evaluations of, and improvements to, conservation measures. Here we report on trawling impacts to deep-sea scleractinian coral reefs in a regional (10–100s of km) fishery seascape off Tasmania (Australia). Our study was based on 148 km of towed camera transects (95 transects on 51 different seamounts with 284,660 separate video annotations and 4,674 “on-seamount” images analysed), and commercial trawling logbook data indexing fishing effort on and around seamounts. We detect trawling damage on 88% (45 of 51) of seamounts. Conversely, intact deep-sea coral reefs persist in refuge areas on about 39% (20 of 51) of the seamounts, and extend onto rocky seabed adjacent to seamounts. Depth significantly shapes the severity of trawl damage. The most profound impacts are evident on shallow seamounts (those peaking in < 950 m depths) where recent and repeated trawling reduced reefs built by scleractinian corals to rubble, forming extensive accumulations around seamount peaks and flanks. At intermediate depths (∼950–1,500 m), trawling damage is highly variable on individual seamounts, ranging from substantial impacts to no detection of coral loss. Deep seamounts (summit depth > 1,500 m) are beyond the typical operating depth of the trawl fishery and exceed the depth range of living deep-sea coral reefs in the region. Accurately diagnosing the nature and extent of direct trawling impacts on seamount scleractinian coral reefs must use stringent criteria to guard against false positive identifications of trawl impact stemming from either (1) misidentifying areas that naturally lacked deep-sea coral reef as areas where coral had been removed, or (2) attributing trawling as the cause of natural processes of reef degradation. The existence of sizeable deep-sea coral reef refuges in a complex mosaic of spatially variable fishing effort suggests that more nuanced approaches to conservation may be warranted than simply protecting untrawled areas, especially when the biological resources with conservation value are rare in a broader seascape context.

Swim with the tide: Tactics to maximize prey detection by a specialist predator, the greater sea snake (Hydrophis major)

Udyawer V, Goiran C, Chateau O, Shine R. Swim with the tide: Tactics to maximize prey detection by a specialist predator, the greater sea snake (Hydrophis major) Somers CM. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2020 ;15(10):e0239920. Available from: https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0239920
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The fitness of a predator depends upon its ability to locate and capture prey; and thus, increasing dietary specialization should favor the evolution of species-specific foraging tactics tuned to taxon-specific habitats and cues. Within marine environments, prey detectability (e.g., via visual or chemical cues) is affected by environmental conditions (e.g., water clarity and tidal flow), such that specialist predators would be expected to synchronize their foraging activity with cyclic variation in such conditions. In the present study, we combined behavioral-ecology experiments on captive sea snakes and their prey (catfish) with acoustic tracking of free-ranging sea snakes, to explore the use of waterborne chemical cues in this predator-prey interaction. In coral-reef ecosystems of New Caledonia, the greater sea snake (Hydrophis major) feeds only upon striped eel catfish (Plotosus lineatus). Captive snakes became more active after exposure to waterborne chemical cues from catfish, whereas catfish did not avoid chemical cues from snakes. Movement patterns of tracked snakes showed that individuals were most active on a rapidly falling tide, which is the time when chemical cues from hidden catfish are likely to be most readily available to a foraging predator. By synchronizing foraging effort with the tidal cycle, greater sea snakes may be able to exploit the availability of chemical cues during a rapidly falling tide to maximize efficiency in locating and capturing prey.

Microplastic Pollution in Deep-Sea Sediments From the Great Australian Bight

Barrett J, Chase Z, Zhang J, Holl MMBanasza, Willis K, Williams A, Hardesty BD, Wilcox C. Microplastic Pollution in Deep-Sea Sediments From the Great Australian Bight. Frontiers in Marine Science [Internet]. 2020 ;7. Available from: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2020.576170/full?utm_source=F-AAE&utm_medium=EMLF&utm_campaign=MRK_1452864_45_Marine_20201008_arts_A
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Interest in understanding the extent of plastic and specifically microplastic pollution has increased on a global scale. However, we still know relatively little about how much plastic pollution has found its way into the deeper areas of the world’s oceans. The extent of microplastic pollution in deep-sea sediments remains poorly quantified, but this knowledge is imperative for predicting the distribution and potential impacts of global plastic pollution. To address this knowledge gap, we quantified microplastics in deep-sea sediments from the Great Australian Bight using an adapted density separation and dye fluorescence technique. We analyzed sediment cores from six locations (1–6 cores each, n = 16 total samples) ranging in depth from 1,655 to 3,062 m and offshore distances ranging from 288 to 356 km from the Australian coastline. Microplastic counts ranged from 0 to 13.6 fragments per g dry sediment (mean 1.26 ± 0.68; n = 51). We found substantially higher microplastic counts than recorded in other analyses of deep-sea sediments. Overall, the number of microplastic fragments in the sediment increased as surface plastic counts increased, and as the seafloor slope angle increased. However, microplastic counts were highly variable, with heterogeneity between sediment cores from the same location greater than the variation across sampling sites. Based on our empirical data, we conservatively estimate 14 million tonnes of microplastic reside on the ocean floor.

Me and My Behavior: An Experiment on Individual Characteristics and Compliance Behavior in Recreational Fishing

Mackay M, van Putten EIngrid, Yamazaki S, Jennings S, Sibly H. Me and My Behavior: An Experiment on Individual Characteristics and Compliance Behavior in Recreational Fishing. Frontiers in Marine Science [Internet]. 2020 ;7. Available from: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2020.579213/full?utm_source=F-AAE&utm_medium=EMLF&utm_campaign=MRK_1452864_45_Marine_20201008_arts_A
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Non-compliance with regulations is a complex problem in recreational fisheries management, having the potential to evoke uncertainty for conservation and socio-ecological outcomes and to undermine management efforts. While we know that in fisheries people make trade-offs between following or breaking rules, it is of interest to determine how people respond to different management incentives to curtail non-compliance. The overall aim of this study is to examine what individual psycho-social characteristics are associated with responses to instrumental and normative management incentives in a recreational fisheries context through the use of an economic experiment. We examined five psycho-social characteristics, three of which (expectation of behavior of others, social norms, and risk preferences) have separately been explored within the fisheries compliance literature, while two factors (ecological values and personality types) have yet to be explored. While information about these two latter characteristics is limited within the fisheries compliance literature, our results suggest that they are relevant predictors for certain compliance groups across compliance incentives. The findings underline that there is significant heterogeneity in the associations between psycho-social make-up and compliance behaviors. Knowledge of this behavioral relationship can progress fisheries management toward increased innovation by encouraging the management of the individual fisher rather than the average fisher.

The Cumulative Effects of Fishing, Plankton Productivity, and Marine Mammal Consumption in a Marine Ecosystem

Fu C, Xu Y, Guo C, Olsen N, Grüss A, Liu H, Barrier N, Verley P, Shin Y-J. The Cumulative Effects of Fishing, Plankton Productivity, and Marine Mammal Consumption in a Marine Ecosystem. Frontiers in Marine Science [Internet]. 2020 ;7. Available from: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2020.565699/full?utm_source=F-AAE&utm_medium=EMLF&utm_campaign=MRK_1452864_45_Marine_20201008_arts_A
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The marine ecosystem off British Columbia (BC), Canada, has experienced various changes in the last two decades, including reduced lipid-rich zooplankton biomass, increased marine mammals, and deteriorated commercial fisheries, particularly those targeting pelagic species such as Pacific Herring (Clupea pallasii). Understanding how stressors interactively and cumulatively affect commercially important fish species is key to moving toward ecosystem-based fisheries management. Because it is challenging to assess the cumulative effects of multiple stressors by using empirical data alone, a dynamic, individual-based spatially explicit ecosystem modeling platform such as Object-oriented Simulator of Marine Ecosystems (OSMOSE) represents a valuable tool to simulate ecological processes and comprehensively evaluate how stressors cumulatively impact modeled species. In this study, we employed OSMOSE to investigate the cumulative effects of fishing, plankton biomass change, and marine mammal consumption on the dynamics of some fish species and the BC marine ecosystem as a whole. We specifically simulated ecosystem dynamics during the last 20 years under two sets of scenarios: (1) unfavorable conditions from the perspective of commercial fish species (i.e., doubling fishing mortality rates, halving plankton biomass, and doubling marine mammal biomass, acting individually or collectively); and (2) favorable conditions with the three factors having opposite changes (i.e., halving fishing mortality rates, doubling plankton biomass, and halving marine mammal biomass, acting individually or collectively). Our results indicate that, under unfavorable conditions, the degree to which species biomass was reduced varied among species, and that negative synergistic and negative dampened effects were dominant under historical and doubled fishing mortality rates, respectively. Under favorable conditions, species biomasses did not increase as much as expected due to the existence of complex predator-prey interactions among fish species, and positive synergistic and positive dampened effects were prevailing under historical and halved fishing mortality rates, respectively. The ecosystem total biomass and the biomass to fisheries yield ratio were found to be good ecological indicators to represent ecosystem changes and track the impacts from the multiple drivers of change. Our research provides insights on how fisheries management should adapt to prepare for potential future impacts of climate change.

The Global Fisheries Subsidies Divide Between Small- and Large-Scale Fisheries

Schuhbauer A, Skerritt DJ, Ebrahim N, Le Manach F, U. Sumaila R. The Global Fisheries Subsidies Divide Between Small- and Large-Scale Fisheries. Frontiers in Marine Science [Internet]. 2020 ;7. Available from: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2020.539214/full?utm_source=F-AAE&utm_medium=EMLF&utm_campaign=MRK_1452864_45_Marine_20201008_arts_A
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

In 2015 the Sustainable Development Goals of the United Nations stipulated that certain forms of subsidies that the fishing sector receive must be prohibited. However, the global fishing sector is complex and varied, and as such there remains a need for information on the distribution of subsidies between the different regions and their sub-sectors. This bottom-up study therefore provides up-dated and improved analyses of the financial support fishing sub-sectors receive from public entities. Estimates show that of the USD 35.4 billion of global fisheries subsidies provided in 2018, 19% went to the small-scale fishing sub-sector (SSF), including artisanal, and subsistence fisheries. Whilst more than 80% went to the large-scale (industrial) fishing sub-sector (LSF). Analysis by subsidy category and type shows, for example, that the majority of the subsidies that the LSF receive are in the form of capacity-enhancing subsidies (USD 18.3 billion) with fuel subsidies being the highest overall subsidy type (USD 7.2 billion). Fuel subsidies are especially harmful as they perpetuate fuel inefficient technology. Since the last estimate of the global fisheries subsidies divide, the percentage of capacity-enhancing subsidies within the SSF has increased from 41% in 2009 to 59% in 2018. When assessing the level of subsidization per active fisher at the global scale, a fisher involved in LSF receives disproportionally (3.5 times) more subsidies than a fisher involved in SSF and in terms of subsidies per landed value LSF receive twice as many subsidies per dollar landed than SSF. This unequal distribution of government support exacerbates the ongoing political and economic marginalization of SSF, globally. The Sustainable Development Goals and the supporting science are quite clear, we must remove all capacity-enhancing subsidies across all sub-sectors and regions which exacerbate overcapacity and overfishing, in order to ensure the sustainability of our fish stocks. Our recommendation is that capacity-enhancing subsidies be removed and instead used to support fishers through coastal fishing community projects that focus on fisheries sustainability, social justice and food security, rather than on reducing the cost of fishing or artificially enhancing profits through the provision of harmful subsidization.

Between a Reef and a Hard Place: Capacity to Map the Next Coral Reef Catastrophe

Hickey SM, Radford B, Roelfsema CM, Joyce KE, Wilson SK, Marrable D, Barker K, Wyatt M, Davies HN, Leon JX, et al. Between a Reef and a Hard Place: Capacity to Map the Next Coral Reef Catastrophe. Frontiers in Marine Science [Internet]. 2020 ;7. Available from: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2020.544290/full?utm_source=F-AAE&utm_medium=EMLF&utm_campaign=MRK_1452864_45_Marine_20201008_arts_A
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Increasing sea surface temperature and extreme heat events pose the greatest threat to coral reefs globally, with trends exceeding previous norms. The resultant mass bleaching events, such as those evidenced on the Great Barrier Reef in 2016, 2017, and 2020 have substantial ecological costs in addition to economic and social costs. Advancing remote (nanosatellites, rapid revisit traditional satellites) and in-field (drones) technological capabilities, cloud data processing, and analysis, coupled with existing infrastructure and in-field monitoring programs, have the potential to provide cost-effective and timely information to managers allowing them to better understand changes on reefs and apply effective remediation. Within a risk management framework for monitoring coral bleaching, we present an overview of how remote sensing can be used throughout the whole risk management cycle and highlight the role technological advancement has in earth observations of coral reefs for bleaching events.

A high-resolution remotely sensed benthic habitat map of the Qatari coastal zone

Butler JD, Purkis SJ, Yousif R, Al-Shaikh I, Warren C. A high-resolution remotely sensed benthic habitat map of the Qatari coastal zone. Marine Pollution Bulletin [Internet]. 2020 ;160:111634. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025326X20307529?dgcid=raven_sd_search_email
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

A comprehensive, high resolution, ground truthed benthic habitat map has been completed for Qatar's coastal zone and Halul Island. The objectives of this research were to; 1. Systematically compare and contrast pixel- and object-based classifiers for benthic mapping in a limited focus area and then to, 2. Apply these learnings to develop an accurate high resolution benthic habitat map for the entirety of the Qatari coastal zone. Results indicate object-based methods proved more efficient and accurate when compared to pixel based classifiers. The developed country-wide map covers 4500 km2 and underscores the complex interplay of seagrass, macroalgal, and reefal habitats, as well as areas of expansive mangrove forests and microbial mats. The map developed here is a first of its kind in the region. Many potential applications exist for the datasets collected to provide fundamental information that can be used for ecosystem-based management decision making.

Plastic waste from marine environment: Demonstration of possible routes for recycling by different manufacturing technologies

Ronkay F, Molnar B, Gere D, Czigany T. Plastic waste from marine environment: Demonstration of possible routes for recycling by different manufacturing technologies. Waste Management [Internet]. 2021 ;119:101 - 110. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0956053X20305407?dgcid=raven_sd_search_email
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The increasing amount of marine plastic waste poses challenges including, not only the collection, but also the subsequent recyclability of the plastic. An artificial accelerated weathering procedure was developed, which modelled the marine environment and investigated the recyclability of weathered and non-weathered PET. Marine conditions were simulated for poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) bottle material and high-density polyethylene (HDPE) cap material. It consisted of 2520 h cyclical weathering, alternating the sample between a salt spray and a Xenon-chamber—this corresponds to roughly 3–4 years on the surface of an ocean.

It was proved that the molecular weight of PET is a function of weathering time and can be described mathematically. Microscopic examination of the surface of the PET bottles and HDPE caps proved that these surfaces were damaged. After weathering, manufacturing tests were performed on the PET material by extrusion, injection moulding, 3D printing and thermoforming. Quantitative comparison between products manufactured by the same technology was performed in order to compare the qualities of products made from original PET, non-weathered PET waste, which was the example of classical recycling, and weathered PET. In the case of products made from weathered PET, certain mechanical and optical properties (e.g. impact strength and transparency) were significantly impaired compared to the original PET and the recycled, non-weathered PET. Certain other properties (e.g. strength and rigidity) did not change significantly. It was proved that the samples from weathered plastic material can be successfully recycled mechanically and used to manufacture plastic products.

Plastic pollution solutions: emerging technologies to prevent and collect marine plastic pollution

Schmaltz E, Melvin EC, Diana Z, Gunady EF, Rittschof D, Somarelli JA, Virdin J, Dunphy-Daly MM. Plastic pollution solutions: emerging technologies to prevent and collect marine plastic pollution. Environment International [Internet]. 2020 ;144:106067. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160412020320225?via%3Dihub
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

As plastic waste accumulates in the ocean at alarming rates, the need for efficient and sustainable remediation solutions is urgent. One solution is the development and mobilization of technologies that either 1) prevent plastics from entering waterways or 2) collect marine and riverine plastic pollution. To date, however, few reports have focused on these technologies, and information on various technological developments is scattered. This leaves policymakers, innovators, and researchers without a central, comprehensive, and reliable source of information on the status of available technology to target this global problem. The goal of this study was to address this gap by creating a comprehensive inventory of technologies currently used or in development to prevent the leakage of plastic pollution or collect existing plastic pollution. Our Plastic Pollution Prevention and Collection Technology Inventory (https://nicholasinstitute.duke.edu/plastics-technology-inventory) can be used as a roadmap for researchers and governments to 1) facilitate comparisons between the scope of solutions and the breadth and severity of the plastic pollution problem and 2) assist in identifying strengths and weaknesses of current technological approaches. We created this inventory from a systematic search and review of resources that identified technologies. Technologies were organized by the type of technology and target plastics (i.e., macroplastics, microplastic, or both). We identified 52 technologies that fall into the two categories of prevention or collection of plastic pollution. Of these, 59% focus specifically on collecting macroplastic waste already in waterways. While these efforts to collect plastic pollution are laudable, their current capacity and widespread implementation are limited in comparison to their potential and the vast extent of the plastic pollution problem. Similarly, few technologies attempt to prevent plastic pollution leakage, and those that do are limited in scope. A comprehensive approach is needed that combines technology, policymaking, and advocacy to prevent further plastic pollution and the subsequent damage to aquatic ecosystems and human health.

Anthropogenic electromagnetic fields (EMF) influence the behaviour of bottom-dwelling marine species

Hutchison ZL, Gill AB, Sigray P, He H, King JW. Anthropogenic electromagnetic fields (EMF) influence the behaviour of bottom-dwelling marine species. Scientific Reports [Internet]. 2020 ;10(1). Available from: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-020-60793-x
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Many marine animals have evolved sensory abilities to use electric and magnetic cues in essential aspects of life history, such as to detect prey, predators and mates as well as to orientate and migrate. Potential disruption of vital cues by human activities must be understood in order to mitigate potential negative influences. Cable deployments in coastal waters are increasing worldwide, in capacity and number, owing to growing demands for electrical power and telecommunications. Increasingly, the local electromagnetic environment used by electro- and magneto-sensitive species will be altered. We quantified biologically relevant behavioural responses of the presumed, magneto-receptive American lobster and the electro-sensitive Little skate to electromagnetic field (EMF) emissions of a subsea high voltage direct current (HVDC) transmission cable for domestic electricity supply. We demonstrate a striking increase in exploratory/foraging behaviour in skates in response to EMF and a more subtle exploratory response in lobsters. In addition, by directly measuring both the magnetic and electric field components of the EMF emitted by HVDC cables we found that there were DC and unexpectedly AC components. Modelling, restricted to the DC component, showed good agreement with measured results. Our cross-disciplinary study highlights the need to integrate an understanding of the natural and anthropogenic EMF environment together with the responses of sensitive animals when planning future cable deployments and predicting their environmental effects.

The current state of marine debris on the seafloor in offshore area around Japan

Kuroda M, Uchida K, Tokai T, Miyamoto Y, Mukai T, Imai K, Shimizu K, Yagi M, Yamanaka Y, Mituhashi T. The current state of marine debris on the seafloor in offshore area around Japan. Marine Pollution Bulletin [Internet]. 2020 ;161:111670. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025326X20307888?dgcid=raven_sd_search_email
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Marine debris on the seafloor has not been thoroughly investigated, and there is little information compared to other types of marine debris. We conducted bottom trawl surveys to determine the present situation of marine debris on the seafloor in offshore areas around Japan. The survey was conducted in three sea areas with different characteristics. As a result, it was found that the amount of marine debris in submarine canyons (2926.1 items/km2) was higher than on the continental shelf. It was revealed that most marine debris on the seafloor is comprised of plastic products, and that debris on the seafloor retains its condition for a long time (over 30 years) without deterioration. In addition, the type of marine debris is affected by the industries operating in each area. Continuing to investigate marine debris on the seafloor in more areas will contribute to solving the problem of marine debris.

Can we locate shrimp aquaculture areas from space? – A case study for Thailand

Dorber M, Verones F, Nakaoka M, Sudo K. Can we locate shrimp aquaculture areas from space? – A case study for Thailand. Remote Sensing Applications: Society and Environment [Internet]. 2020 ;20:100416. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2352938520301415?dgcid=raven_sd_search_email
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Globally, shrimp aquaculture has undergone a rapid development in the last decades, as it can help to satisfy the increasing food demand of a growing population. However, shrimp production can be accompanied by environmental impacts, such as land cover changes associated with pond construction, or the degradation of coastal areas through pollution. Environmental footprinting, has proven to be a valuable tool for tracing environmental impacts from human consumption back to their location and sector of origin. Here, we focus on the land footprint, which quantifies the area of required land resources to satisfy human consumption (of shrimp production). However, today’s footprinting tools often lack spatially explicit land cover information for land footprint assessments. In this study we developed a new method, which allows us to identify the land cover change caused by shrimp pond construction in Thailand without using sample shrimp pond shape polygons as input data. We use the global water surface explorer (using globally 3 million Landsat 5 TM, Landsat 7 ETM and Landsat 8 OLI images, acquired between 1984 and 2015), aerial photographs and land cover maps in combination with known aquaculture locations, to identify water areas in Thailand that have a high likelihood to be a shrimp pond and to assess the corresponding land cover change. We estimated that in 2015 an area of 377 km2 had a high likelihood of being shrimp pond water area. Further, we show that the construction of shrimp ponds in Thailand was responsible for the transformation of 552 km2 primary habitat, such as mangrove areas. Our results support the environmental footprint assessment of shrimp ponds in Thailand, while our proposed method allows identifying possible shrimp pond areas on a global scale.

Forty-thousand years of maritime subsistence near a changing shoreline on Alor Island (Indonesia)

Kealy S, O’Connor S, Mahirta , Sari DMustika, Shipton C, Langley MC, Boulanger C, Kaharudin HAF, Patridina EPBGG, Algifary MAbizar, et al. Forty-thousand years of maritime subsistence near a changing shoreline on Alor Island (Indonesia). Quaternary Science Reviews [Internet]. 2020 ;249:106599. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0277379120305618?dgcid=raven_sd_search_email
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

We report archaeological findings from a significant new cave site on Alor Island, Indonesia, with an in situ basal date of 40,208–38,454 cal BP. Twenty thousand years older than the earliest Pleistocene site previously known from this island, Makpan retains dense midden deposits of marine shell, fish bone, urchin and crab remains, but few terrestrial species; demonstrating that protein requirements over this time were met almost exclusively from the sea. The dates for initial occupation at Makpan indicate that once Homo sapiens moved into southern Wallacea, settlement of the larger islands in the archipelago occurred rapidly. However, the Makpan sequence also suggests that the use of the cave following initial human arrival was sporadic prior to the terminal Pleistocene about 14,000 years ago, when occupation became intensive, culminating in the formation of a midden. Like the coastal sites on the larger neighbouring island of Timor, the Makpan assemblage shows that maritime technology in the Pleistocene was highly developed in this region. The Makpan assemblage also contains a range of distinctive personal ornaments made on Nautilus shell, which are shared with sites located on Timor and Kisar supporting connectivity between islands from at least the terminal Pleistocene. Makpan’s early inhabitants responded to sea-level change by altering the way they used both the site and local resources. Marine food exploitation shows an initial emphasis on sea-urchins, followed by a subsistence switch to molluscs, barnacles, and fish in the dense middle part of the sequence, with crabs well represented in the later occupation. This new record provides further insights into early modern human movements and patterns of occupation between the islands of eastern Nusa Tenggara from ca. 40 ka.

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