Literature Library

Currently indexing 10170 titles

Evaluating the efficacy of small‐scale marine protected areas for preserving reef health: A case study applying emerging monitoring technology

Bayley DTI, Mogg AOM, Purvis A, Koldewey HJ. Evaluating the efficacy of small‐scale marine protected areas for preserving reef health: A case study applying emerging monitoring technology. Aquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems [Internet]. 2019 . Available from: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/aqc.3215
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $42.00
Type: Journal Article
  1. Marine protected areas (MPAs) are widely used as management tools to conserve species and ecosystems at risk from human impact. Coastal managers often focus MPA designation on biogenic reef environments due to their value and sensitivity to damage. However, difficulties in enforcement and a lack of capacity to adequately monitor MPAs often make it hard for managers to assess the effectiveness of MPAs, particularly in under‐resourced, low‐income coastal countries.
  2. Reef community data were collected at three long‐term managed reserves within the Western Visayas region of the central Philippines in order to assess the state of reef community structure inside and outside of these small‐scale locally managed MPAs. In addition, 3D structural data were captured using recently developed 'Structure from Motion' photogrammetry techniques, demonstrating how multiple quantitative metrics of physical structural complexity and health can be recorded in such analyses.
  3. These community‐run MPAs were shown to be effective even when small (10–20 ha). Mean fish biomass density was five times greater within present‐day protected sites, alongside significantly increased levels of fish diversity, richness, and size. No significant structural differences were observed inside and outside of MPAs; however, average reef rugosity, height, and roughness were significantly higher in unfished reefs compared to blast‐fished reefs. Reef substrate complexity, coral composition, and level of management, were also shown to structure fish community assemblages, with the link between reef structure and fish richness/abundance disrupted outside of MPAs.
  4. The Structure from Motion technique allows a greater range of quantitative morphometrics to be assessed than traditional methods and at relatively low cost. The technique is rapid, non‐destructive and can be archived, increasing the value of data for managers wishing to quantify reef health and efficiently monitor benthic changes through time. We discuss both the limitations and benefits of this technology's future use.

Pacific Salmon in the Rapidly Changing Arctic: Exploring Local Knowledge and Emerging Fisheries in Utqiaġvik and Nuiqsut, Alaska

Carothers C, Sformo TL, Cotton S, George JC, Westley PAH. Pacific Salmon in the Rapidly Changing Arctic: Exploring Local Knowledge and Emerging Fisheries in Utqiaġvik and Nuiqsut, Alaska. ARCTIC [Internet]. 2019 ;72(3):273 - 288. Available from: https://journalhosting.ucalgary.ca/index.php/arctic/article/view/68876
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

One of the most pervasive signals of global climate change is altered patterns of distribution with trends towards poleward shifts of species. While habitat loss and destruction has severed connections between people and salmon in many locales, salmon fisheries in the high Arctic are just beginning to develop. To explore these emergent connections, we gathered local knowledge about Pacific salmon and emerging subsistence salmon fisheries in the Beaufort Sea region through ethnographic research in Utqiaġvik (formerly Barrow) and Nuiqsut, Alaska. Between 2010 and 2013, we interviewed 41 active fishermen and Elders who generally agreed that harvests of Pacific salmon species have been increasing in recent years, beginning in the 1990s and early 2000s. About 46% of active fishermen and Elders who discussed salmon abundance perceived an increasing trend over time. Another 43% characterized salmon abundance as cyclical or perceived no directional trend over time. The remaining fishermen (all from Nuiqsut) expressed their perception of decreasing salmon and fish abundance overall related to oil and gas development impacts to their local lands and waters. Given these mixed perceptions and harvests being an imperfect proxy for abundance, it remains unclear whether salmon populations are expanding in Arctic river systems. However, research participants have identified new stream systems not currently documented in the scientific literature where salmon are present and thought to be spawning. In both communities, we found that many fishermen and Elders often do not differentiate Pacific salmon species. Fishermen in both communities are developing new knowledge of salmon and increasing their use of salmon as a subsistence resource, yet uncertainties in the current data and local knowledge combine to generate equivocal evidence that salmon abundance is increasing. This lack of a clear increase in salmon abundance provides nuance to a simple story that warming has led to the increases of salmon in the Arctic. Despite the uncertainty regarding abundance, it is clear we are witnessing an emergence of new salmon fisheries in the high Arctic, perceived to be one among a suite of environmental and social changes currently being experienced in this region.

European spiny lobster recovery from overfishing enhanced through active restocking in Fully Protected Areas

Cau A, Bellodi A, Cannas R, Fois M, Guidetti P, Moccia D, Porcu C, Pusceddu A, Follesa MC. European spiny lobster recovery from overfishing enhanced through active restocking in Fully Protected Areas. Scientific Reports [Internet]. 2019 ;9(1). Available from: http://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-49553-8
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Fully protected areas (FPAs) help preserving biodiversity and reversing the global decline of fishery resources. Stocks of the European spiny lobster Palinurus elephas (Fabr. 1787), among the most precious gourmet seafood worldwide, are currently facing a dramatic decline. Previous attempts of recovery based on fishery restrictions or active post-larval restocking in marine reserves provided unsuccessful outcomes. Here we present results of a 5-year restocking program carried through a Collaborative Fishery Research (CFR) project, in three ad-hoc established FPAs replenished using below-legal size wild juveniles. Results showed that Catch per Unit Effort (CPUE) in terms of both density and biomass burst (by ca. 300–700%) just 2 years since FPAs establishment, regardless of location. We also report tangible spillover effects (ca. 30–50% increase in density and biomass CPUE outside the FPAs) by the end of the program. Data from a 15-years lasting monitoring of a pilot FPA established in 1998, where the restocking protocol was conducted and protection kept in force once restocking ceased, demonstrated the persistence in time of restocking’ benefits. We foster that creation of FPAs assisted with local restocking under oriented CFR programs can represent an option for the recovery of European spiny lobster stocks from overfishing

Demographic fluctuations and the emergence of arctic maritime adaptations

Anderson SL, Brown T, Junge J, Duelks J. Demographic fluctuations and the emergence of arctic maritime adaptations. Journal of Anthropological Archaeology [Internet]. 2019 ;56:101100. Available from: https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0278416518302393
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Our goal is to study the role of demographic change in the development and spread of maritime adaptations in the North American Arctic over the last 6000 years. We compile and analyze a regional radiocarbon database (n = 935) for northern Alaska, using Oxcal to analyze demographic patterns in summed probability distributions. We find that northern Alaskan populations grew significantly over the last 4500 years, although growth was punctuated by three periods of decline from approximately 3700 to 3125 cal BP, 1000 cal BP, and 600 cal BP. We assess possible alternative explanations for the observed demographic patterns (e.g. calibration and taphonomic effects, investigator bias). Region-wide erosion and calibration effects likely contribute to the dearth of radiocarbon dates around 1000 cal BP, and sampling bias may contribute to the post-600 cal BP decline. However, we conclude that the overall pattern reflects regional population growth, decline, and recovery. Population growth predates intensification of marine resource procurement by at least 1200 years; we hypothesize that population growth was a possible driver for late Holocene marine intensification in the Arctic. These findings have further implications for understanding the process of intensification and the development of complexity in coastal hunter-gatherer societies.

Humpback whale song occurrence reflects ecosystem variability in feeding and migratory habitat of the northeast Pacific

Ryan JP, Cline DE, Joseph JE, Margolina T, Santora JA, Kudela RM, Chavez FP, J. Pennington T, Wahl C, Michisaki R, et al. Humpback whale song occurrence reflects ecosystem variability in feeding and migratory habitat of the northeast Pacific Ummenhofer C. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2019 ;14(9):e0222456. Available from: http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0222456
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

This study examines the occurrence of humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) song in the northeast Pacific from three years of continuous recordings off central California (36.713°N, 122.186°W). Song is prevalent in this feeding and migratory habitat, spanning nine months of the year (September–May), peaking in winter (November–January), and reaching a maximum of 86% temporal coverage (during November 2017). From the rise of song in fall through the end of peak occurrence in winter, song length increases significantly from month to month. The seasonal peak in song coincides with the seasonal trough in day length and sighting-based evidence of whales leaving Monterey Bay, consistent with seasonal migration. During the seasonal song peak, diel variation shows maximum occurrence at night (69% of the time), decreasing during dawn and dusk (52%), and further decreasing with increasing solar elevation during the day, reaching a minimum near solar noon (30%). Song occurrence increased 44% and 55% between successive years. Sighting data within the acoustic detection range of the hydrophone indicate that variation in local population density was an unlikely cause of this large interannual variation. Hydrographic data and modeling of acoustic transmission indicate that changes in neither habitat occupancy nor acoustic transmission were probable causes. Conversely, the positive interannual trend in song paralleled major ecosystem variations, including similarly large positive trends in wind-driven upwelling, primary productivity, and krill abundance. Further, the lowest song occurrence during the first year coincided with anomalously warm ocean temperatures and an extremely toxic harmful algal bloom that affected whales and other marine mammals in the region. These major ecosystem variations may have influenced the health and behavior of humpback whales during the study period.

An ecosystem approach to kelp aquaculture in the Americas and Europe

Grebe GS, Byron CJ, Gelais ASt., Kotowicz DM, Olson TK. An ecosystem approach to kelp aquaculture in the Americas and Europe. Aquaculture Reports [Internet]. 2019 ;15:100215. Available from: https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S2352513419300134
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Kelp farming is increasing along the temperate coastlines of the Americas and Europe. The economic, ecological, and social frameworks surrounding kelp farming in these new areas are in contrast with the conditions of progenitor kelp farming regions in China, Japan, and Korea.

Thus, identifying and addressing the environmental and social impacts of kelp farming in these regions is vital to ensuring the industry’s long-term sustainability. Here, a conceptual model of the human and natural systems supporting this nascent kelp aquaculture sector was developed using Maine, USA as a focal region. Potential negative impacts of kelp aquaculture were identified to be habitat degradation, overfishing of wild seeds, predation and competition with wild fish and genes, and transmission of diseases. Increased food security, improved restoration efforts, greater fisheries productivity, and alternative livelihoods development were determined to be potential positive impacts of kelp aquaculture. Changes in biodiversity and productivity resulting from either negative or positive impacts of kelp aquaculture were confirmed to have downstream effects on local fisheries and coastal communities. Recommendations to improve or protect the ecosystem services tangential to kelp farming include: define ecosystem and management boundaries, assess ecosystem services and environmental carrying capacity, pursue ecologically and socially considerate engineering, and protect the health and genetic diversity of wild kelp beds. Recommendations to ensure that kelp farming improves the well-being of all stakeholders include: increase horizontal expansion, expand and teach Best Management Practices, and develop climate change resiliency. Additionally, an integrated management strategy should be developed for wild and farmed kelp to ensure that kelp aquaculture is developed in the context of other sectors and goals.

Sunken Worlds: The Past and Future of Human-Made Reefs in Marine Conservation

Castelló y Tickell S, Sáenz-Arroyo A, Milner-Gulland EJ. Sunken Worlds: The Past and Future of Human-Made Reefs in Marine Conservation. BioScience [Internet]. 2019 ;69(9):725 - 735. Available from: https://academic.oup.com/bioscience/article/69/9/725/5542571\
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Structures submerged in the sea by humans over millennia provide hard and longstanding evidence of anthropogenic influence in the marine environment. Many of these human-made reefs (HMRs) may provide opportunities for conservation despite having been created for different purposes such as fishing or tourism. In the middle of controversy around the costs and benefits of HMRs, a broad analysis of biodiversity and social values is necessary to assess conservation potential. This requires reframing HMRs as social–ecological systems, moving beyond comparisons with natural coral or rocky reefs to consider their roles as ecosystems in their own right; creating frameworks to track their type, number, size, units, location, characteristics, origins, social uses, and associated biodiversity locally and worldwide; and applying systematic assessment of conservation benefits in relation to stated conservation intentions. This integrative approach can catalyze learning, identify conservation opportunities, and inform positive management of HMRs into the future.

Tsunami risk hazard in Tokyo Bay: The challenge of future sea level rise

Nagai R, Takabatake T, Esteban M, Ishii H, Shibayama T. Tsunami risk hazard in Tokyo Bay: The challenge of future sea level rise. International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction [Internet]. 2019 :101321. Available from: https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S221242091930456X
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $31.50
Type: Journal Article

Sea level rise is one of the major challenges facing humanity in the 21st century, and could compound the risks posed by tsunamis to coastal cities. The authors conducted computer simulations of tsunami inundation and propagation into Tokyo Bay, and analysed the risks that such events pose to the cities of Yokohama and Kawasaki, for different sea level rise scenarios (and assuming a high tide situation). The results show that unless significant investment in improved coastal defences is made, the area that can potentially be flooded by such events will gradually increase in the course of the 21st century. However, the risk to the life of the inhabitants of these cities will broadly remained unchanged until sea levels become +1.0 m higher than at present. From then, the risk of casualties taking place will rapidly increase, as the depth and velocity of the tsunami wave will substantially rise. Such results provide some indication regarding the long-term planning strategy to manage coastal defences around Tokyo Bay, highlighting the need to eventually reinforce coastal defences and the important contribution of tsunami evacuation to minimize casualties during such events.

Coastal dynamics and adaptation to uncertain sea level rise: Optimal portfolios for salt marsh migration

Vinent ODuran, Johnston RJ, Kirwan ML, Leroux AD, Martin VL. Coastal dynamics and adaptation to uncertain sea level rise: Optimal portfolios for salt marsh migration. Journal of Environmental Economics and Management [Internet]. 2019 :102262. Available from: https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0095069618304248
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

he sustainability of dynamic natural systems often depends on their capacity to adapt to uncertain climate-related changes, where different management options may be combined to facilitate this adaptation. Salt marshes exemplify such a system. Marsh sustainability under rapid sea level rise requires the preservation of transgression zones - undeveloped uplands onto which marshes migrate. Whether these uplands eventually become marsh depends on uncertain sea level rise and natural dynamics that determine migration onto different land types. Under conditions such as these, systematically diversified management actions generally outperform ad hoc or non-diversified alternatives. This paper develops the first adaptation portfolio model designed to optimize the benefits of a migrating coastal system. Results are illustrated using a case study of marsh conservation in Virginia, USA. Results suggest that models of this type can enhance adaptation benefits beyond those available through current approaches.

Microplastics in oysters (Crassostrea gigas) and water at the Bahía Blanca Estuary (Southwestern Atlantic): An emerging issue of global concern

Severini MDFernán, Villagran DM, Buzzi NS, Chatelain SG. Microplastics in oysters (Crassostrea gigas) and water at the Bahía Blanca Estuary (Southwestern Atlantic): An emerging issue of global concern. Regional Studies in Marine Science [Internet]. 2019 :100829. Available from: https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S2352485518303700
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $31.50
Type: Journal Article

Detection of microplastics (MPs) in biotic and abiotic matrices is relevant to evaluate how marine ecosystem’s exposure to these pollutants is of emerging environmental concern and at risk of loss of functionality and biodiversity. The presence of MPs was studied for the first time in the gut of benthic oysters (Crassostrea gigas) and in the water column in a eutrophic estuary under high anthropogenic pressure, in the southwestern Atlantic. Significant abundances of small plastic debris were found at all the sampling stations- mainly fibers, fragments, pellets, and beads. MPs were categorized and counted according to type, color, and size. Microfibers presented the highest percentage of abundance in the water column (98% with Van Dorn bottles and 72.73 % with a plankton net) as well as in oysters (91%). In water collected with Van Dorn bottles, the total MP concentrations ranged from 5900 to 782,000 particles/m3 and from 42.6 to 113.6 particles/m3 in samples collected with a plankton net. The widespread presence of fibers in all the assessed components could be related to the intense harbor activities in the area, such as the use of ropes for the mooring of boats and from fishing nets, as well as from domestic and industrial effluents. The presence of MPs in both the pelagic and benthic realms may imply risk for the animals that inhabit the estuary, and for human wellbeing, with respect to the potential transfer of MPs through the food web, affecting the provisioning of ecosystem services.

Aliens cruising in: Explaining alien fouling macro-invertebrate species numbers on recreational yachts

Peters K, Sink K, Robinson TB. Aliens cruising in: Explaining alien fouling macro-invertebrate species numbers on recreational yachts. Ocean & Coastal Management [Internet]. 2019 :104986. Available from: https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0964569119301899
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

The extent of biofouling on recreational vessels has been used as a proxy for the presence of alien species and has been linked with vessel characteristics. However, the relationship between these factors and alien species numbers has not been examined, despite the importance of this metric for invasive species management. This study assessed physical characteristics, maintenance regimes and travel patterns of yachts and their relationship with the number of macro-invertebrate alien species present on vessels from four South African marinas. Overall, 88% of yachts were fouled with macro-invertebrate alien species. The only factor that influenced alien species numbers in the context of this study was the primary use of yachts, with cruising yachts supporting significantly more alien species than racing yachts. This is likely linked to differences in cleaning regimes, as racers are subject to rigorous and frequent cleaning. These findings suggest that cruising vessels may play a key role in the intra-regional transfer of alien species and that racing yachts likely pose a lower biosecurity threat.

Future Ocean Observations to Connect Climate, Fisheries and Marine Ecosystems

Schmidt JO, Bograd SJ, Arrizabalaga H, Azevedo JL, Barbeaux SJ, Barth JA, Boyer T, Brodie S, Cárdenas JJosé, Cross S, et al. Future Ocean Observations to Connect Climate, Fisheries and Marine Ecosystems. Frontiers in Marine Science [Internet]. 2019 ;6. Available from: https://www.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fmars.2019.00550/full
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Advances in ocean observing technologies and modeling provide the capacity to revolutionize the management of living marine resources. While traditional fisheries management approaches like single-species stock assessments are still common, a global effort is underway to adopt ecosystem-based fisheries management (EBFM) approaches. These approaches consider changes in the physical environment and interactions between ecosystem elements, including human uses, holistically. For example, integrated ecosystem assessments aim to synthesize a suite of observations (physical, biological, socioeconomic) and modeling platforms [ocean circulation models, ecological models, short-term forecasts, management strategy evaluations (MSEs)] to assess the current status and recent and future trends of ecosystem components. This information provides guidance for better management strategies. A common thread in EBFM approaches is the need for high-quality observations of ocean conditions, at scales that resolve critical physical-biological processes and are timely for management needs. Here we explore options for a future observing system that meets the needs of EBFM by (i) identifying observing needs for different user groups, (ii) reviewing relevant datasets and existing technologies, (iii) showcasing regional case studies, and (iv) recommending observational approaches required to implement EBFM. We recommend linking ocean observing within the context of Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS) and other regional ocean observing efforts with fisheries observations, new forecasting methods, and capacity development, in a comprehensive ocean observing framework.

Examining linkages between ecosystem services and social wellbeing to improve governance for coastal conservation in Jamaica

Chan C, Armitage D, Alexander SM, Campbell D. Examining linkages between ecosystem services and social wellbeing to improve governance for coastal conservation in Jamaica. Ecosystem Services [Internet]. 2019 ;39:100997. Available from: https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S2212041618304509
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $31.50
Type: Journal Article

This research examines perceptions of the linkages between ecosystem services (ES) and social wellbeing in a small-scale fishing community in Bluefields, Jamaica. It analyzes the perceived changes to these linkages based on the impacts of a marine protected area (MPA) on this coastal social-ecological system. MPAs can have positive long-term social and ecological effects, but in the short-term they can negatively impact communities, and careful attention to these impacts is needed to achieve positive conservation outcomes. We conducted 42 semi-structured interviews and six focus groups discussions with community members in Bluefields. Key findings from this research include: 1) the importance of provisioning (e.g., fish, lobster) and cultural ES (e.g., cultural heritage, bequest values) and their bundled qualities to both fishers and non-fishers; 2) the perceived impact of the MPA is highest for inshore fishers, while offshore fishers/non-fishers reported few/no negative impacts; and 3) inshore fishers perceive being more marginalized in governance processes, despite reporting the greatest negative change to ES access and social wellbeing from MPA implementation. The results suggest that governance processes for coastal conservation must acknowledge the individual and shared values of coastal areas and traditional livelihoods to achieve long-term legitimacy and support.

Optimizing functional groups in ecosystem models: Case study of the Great Barrier Reef

Haller-Bull V, Rovenskaya E. Optimizing functional groups in ecosystem models: Case study of the Great Barrier Reef. Ecological Modelling [Internet]. 2019 ;411:108806. Available from: https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S030438001930314X
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

Uncertainty is inherent in ecosystem modelling, however its effects on modelling results are often poorly understood or ignored. This study addresses the issue of structural uncertainty or, more specifically, model resolution and its impact on the analysis of ecosystem vulnerability to threats. While guidelines for node assignments exist, they are not always underlined with quantitative analysis. Different resolutions of a coral reef network are investigated by comparing the simulated network dynamics over time in various threat scenarios. We demonstrate that the error between a higher-resolution and a lower-resolution models increases, first slowly then rapidly with increased degree of node aggregation. This informs the choice of an optimal model resolution whereby a finer level of a food web representation yields only minimal additional accuracy, while increasing computational cost substantially. Furthermore, our analysis shows that species biomass ratio and the consumption ratio are important parameters to guide node aggregation to minimize the error.

Calling for a new agenda for conservation science to create evidence-informed policy

Rose DChristian, Amano T, González-Varo JP, Mukherjee N, Robertson RJ, Simmons BI, Wauchope HS, Sutherland WJ. Calling for a new agenda for conservation science to create evidence-informed policy. Biological Conservation [Internet]. 2019 ;238:108222. Available from: https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0006320719306111
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Improving the use of scientific evidence in conservation policy has been a long-standing focus of the conservation community. A plethora of studies have examined conservation science-policy interfaces, including a recent global survey of scientists, policy-makers, and practitioners. This identified a list of top barriers and solutions to evidence use, which have considerable overlap with those identified by other studies conducted over the last few decades. The three top barriers – (i) that conservation is not a political priority, (ii) that there is poor engagement between scientists and decision-makers, and (iii) that conservation problems are complex and uncertain – have often been highlighted in the literature as significant constraints on the use of scientific evidence in conservation policy. There is also repeated identification of the solutions to these barriers. In this perspective, we consider three reasons for this: (1) the barriers are insurmountable, (2) the frequently-proposed solutions are poor, (3) there are implementation challenges to putting solutions into practice. We argue that implementation challenges are most likely to be preventing the solutions being put into practice and that the research agenda for conservation science-policy interfaces needs to move away from identifying barriers and solutions, and towards a detailed investigation of how to overcome these implementation challenges.

Differences in fish communities on natural versus artificial temperate reefs, groundfish conservation applications in British Columbia

Bulger DS, Fisher JT, Volpe JP. Differences in fish communities on natural versus artificial temperate reefs, groundfish conservation applications in British Columbia. Marine Environmental Research [Internet]. 2019 :104788. Available from: https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0141113619303411
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Human-made marine habitats such as artificial reefs are used to mitigate marine habitat degradation and aid conservation of species at risk. We used ROV and sonar to survey threatened rockfish (Sebastes spp.) and other groundfish species associated with 18 artificial and natural reefs along the south coast of BC, Canada. Using an information-theoretic approach, we found that community composition significantly differed between natural and artificial reefs. Artificial reefs had high variability in rockfish abundance, some supporting very high or low relative abundance. Natural reefs consistently supported intermediate rockfish abundances. Groundfish diversity was significantly greater on natural reefs than artificial reefs. Depth and relief were significant predictors for both abundance and species richness. Interestingly, rockfish abundance was negatively associated with proximity to nearest rockfish conservation area. This research is a first step in understanding causal mechanisms leading to differences between fish communities on artificial reefs in our study system, and which reef attributes may facilitate successful contributions to conservation. Though artificial reefs show promise in the conservation of some threatened species, the maintenance of diverse fish communities depends on protection of heterogenous natural reef communities.

The effects of nanoplastics on marine plankton: A case study with polymethylmethacrylate

Venâncio C, Ferreira I, Martins MA, Soares AMVM, Lopes I, Oliveira M. The effects of nanoplastics on marine plankton: A case study with polymethylmethacrylate. Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety [Internet]. 2019 ;184:109632. Available from: https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0147651319309637
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

Marine biota is currently exposed to plastic pollution. The biological effects of plastics may vary according to polymer types (e.g. polystyrene, polyethylene, acrylate), size of particles (macro, micro or nanoparticles) and their shape. There is a considerable lack of knowledge in terms of effects of nanoplastics (NP) to marine biota particularly of polymers like polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). Thus, this study aimed to assess its ecotoxicological effects using a battery of standard monospecific bioassays with four marine microalgae (Tetraselmis chuii, Nannochloropsis gaditana, Isochrysis galbana and Thalassiosira weissflogii) and a marine rotifer species (Brachionus plicatilis). The tested PMMA-NP concentrations allowed the estimation of median effect concentrations for all microalgae species. T. weissflogii and T. chuii were respectively the most sensitive (EC50,96h of 83.75 mg/L) and least sensitive species (EC50,96h of 132.52 mg/L). The PMMA-NP were also able to induce mortality in rotifers at concentrations higher than 4.69 mg/L with an estimated 48 h median lethal concentration of 13.27 mg/L. A species sensitivity distribution curve (SSD), constructed based on data available in the literature and the data obtained in this study, reveal that PMMA-NP appears as less harmful to marine biota than other polymers like polystyrene.

Improving microplastic research

Weis JS. Improving microplastic research. AIMS Environmental Science [Internet]. 2019 ;6(5):326 - 340. Available from: http://www.aimspress.com/article/10.3934/environsci.2019.5.326
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

While plastic items like bottles, bags, and balloons are highly visible litter and well-known as ugly eyesores and hazards to wildlife, there is another form of plastic that is generally not visible but is far more numerous and may be equally or more hazardous in the environment. This is microplastic, small pieces ranging from 5 mm in size down to microscopic. Microplastics are categorized as primary microplastic – that which was always tiny, and secondary microplastic-which results from the fragmentation of larger pieces. As with larger pieces, microplastics represent a variety of different polymers, such as polyethylene, polystyrene, etc. They are found in a variety of shapes, including spheres, fragments, films, and fibers. In the past decade there has been a great amount of study on microplastics – where they come from, where they are found, how organisms interact with them, and what effects they may have on the organisms and the ecosystem. Most of these studies have focused on the marine environment since that is where they were initially detected, but they have subsequently been found to be abundant in freshwater and terrestrial environments as well. This review examines the research, emphasizing aquatic environments, and suggests avenues for improving future research.

Transport of marine microplastic particles: why is it so difficult to predict?

Khatmullina L, Chubarenko I. Transport of marine microplastic particles: why is it so difficult to predict?. Anthropocene Coasts [Internet]. 2019 ;2(1):293 - 305. Available from: http://www.nrcresearchpress.com/doi/pdf/10.1139/anc-2018-0024
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Marine microplastic particles (MPs,<5 mm) exhibit wide ranges of densities,sizes, and shapes, so that the entire MPsensembleat every time instant can be character-ized by continuous distributions of these parameters. Accordingly, this community ofparticles demonstrates distributions of dynamical properties, such as sinking or risingvelocity, critical shear stress, and the re-suspension threshold. Moreover, all the MPsproperties vary significantly with the time spent in marine environment and withparticular conditions experienced by the particle on its journey. A brief review of thepresent-day numerical efforts towards prediction of MPs transport shows the prevalenceof the Lagrangian particle tracking approach, especially for floating litter. In a broadercontext, the present practice of MPs transport modelling follows theselectivestrategy(e.g., only a certain sub-class of MPs, or specific processes, are considered, sometimes in onlyone- or two-dimensional setting). The heterogeneous nature of MPs, their enormous longevityand movability in marine environment, and the wide spectrum of the involved environ-mental processes suggest further integration (or coupling) of different models in future, aswell as application of other types of models (ensemble modeling, chaos theory approaches,machine learning, etc.) to the problems of MPs transport and fate in the marine environment.Key words:microplastics, transport, modelling.

Dynamics Analysis of Marine Environmental Protection Information Dissemination Oriented to Social Network

Liu L, Zhang Y. Dynamics Analysis of Marine Environmental Protection Information Dissemination Oriented to Social Network. Journal of Coastal Research [Internet]. 2019 ;94(sp1):26. Available from: https://bioone.org/journals/journal-of-coastal-research/volume-94/issue-sp1/SI94-006.1/Dynamics-Analysis-of-Marine-Environmental-Protection-Information-Dissemination-Oriented-to/10.2112/SI94-006.1.full
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $25.00
Type: Journal Article

The dissemination of marine environmental protection information in social networks is not comprehensive and objective. In order to remedy this defect, this paper proposes a dynamic analysis method of marine environmental protection information dissemination oriented to social network. The dynamic analysis method is introduced into the social marine environmental protection information dissemination to achieve regional dissemination of marine environmental protection information. This method is more efficient and easier to operate. It can effectively spread the expanding operation of social marine environmental protection information, and the amount of marine environmental protection information dissemination on the network unit can be obtained by dynamic analysis. The experiment shows that compared with the previous algorithms, the proposed method has better performance and more prominent expansibility.

Pages

Subscribe to OpenChannels Literature Library