Literature Library

Currently indexing 7519 titles

Photochemical alteration of organic carbon draining permafrost soils shifts microbial metabolic pathways and stimulates respiration

Ward CP, Nalven SG, Crump BC, Kling GW, Cory RM. Photochemical alteration of organic carbon draining permafrost soils shifts microbial metabolic pathways and stimulates respiration. Nature Communications [Internet]. 2017 ;8(1). Available from: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-017-00759-2
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

In sunlit waters, photochemical alteration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) impacts the microbial respiration of DOC to CO2. This coupled photochemical and biological degradation of DOC is especially critical for carbon budgets in the Arctic, where thawing permafrost soils increase opportunities for DOC oxidation to CO2 in surface waters, thereby reinforcing global warming. Here we show how and why sunlight exposure impacts microbial respiration of DOC draining permafrost soils. Sunlight significantly increases or decreases microbial respiration of DOC depending on whether photo-alteration produces or removes molecules that native microbial communities used prior to light exposure. Using high-resolution chemical and microbial approaches, we show that rates of DOC processing by microbes are likely governed by a combination of the abundance and lability of DOC exported from land to water and produced by photochemical processes, and the capacity and timescale that microbial communities have to adapt to metabolize photo-altered DOC.

Mass coral bleaching due to unprecedented marine heatwave in Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument (Northwestern Hawaiian Islands)

Couch CS, Burns JHR, Liu G, Steward K, Gutlay TNicole, Kenyon J, C. Eakin M, Kosaki RK. Mass coral bleaching due to unprecedented marine heatwave in Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument (Northwestern Hawaiian Islands) Bianchi CNike. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2017 ;12(9):e0185121. Available from: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0185121
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

2014 marked the sixth and most widespread mass bleaching event reported in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, home to the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument (PMNM), the world’s second largest marine reserve. This event was associated with an unusual basin-scale warming in the North Pacific Ocean, with an unprecedented peak intensity of around 20°C-weeks of cumulative heat stress at Lisianksi Island. In situ bleaching surveys and satellite data were used to evaluate the relative importance of potential drivers of bleaching patterns in 2014, assess the subsequent morality and its effects on coral communities and 3D complexity, test for signs of regional acclimation, and investigate long-term change in heat stress in PMNM. Surveys conducted at four island/atoll (French Frigate Shoals, Lisianski Island, Pearl and Hermes Atoll, and Midway Atoll) showed that in 2014, percent bleaching varied considerably between islands/atolls and habitats (back reef/fore reef and depth), and was up to 91% in shallow habitats at Lisianski. The percent bleaching during the 2014 event was best explained by a combination of duration of heat stress measured by Coral Reef Watch’s satellite Degree Heating Week, relative community susceptibility (bleaching susceptibility score of each taxon * the taxon’s abundance relative to the total number of colonies), depth and region. Mean coral cover at permanent Lisianski monitoring sites decreased by 68% due to severe losses of Montipora dilatata complex, resulting in rapid reductions in habitat complexity. Spatial distribution of the 2014 bleaching was significantly different from the 2002 and 2004 bleaching events likely due to a combination of differences in heat stress and local acclimatization. Historical satellite data demonstrated heat stress in 2014 was unlike any previous event and that the exposure of corals to the bleaching-level heat stress has increased significantly in the northern PMNM since 1982, highlighting the increasing threat of climate change to reefs.

Adapting systematic conservation planning for climate change

Reside AE, Butt N, Adams VM. Adapting systematic conservation planning for climate change. Biodiversity and Conservation [Internet]. 2017 . Available from: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10531-017-1442-5
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

With the high rate of ecosystem change, effective systematic conservation planning must account for ongoing and imminent threats to biodiversity to ensure its persistence. Accordingly, guidance on appropriate conservation actions in the face of climate change has been accumulating. We review this guidance and bring together the key recommendations needed to successfully account for climate change impacts, relevant to the scale at which natural resource management is carried out. We discuss how the traditional conservation tools of protection and restoration need to be adjusted to be effective in the face of climate change. We highlight the conservation innovations such as moveable and temporary reserves, and Targeted Gene Flow. We build on recent work to provide critical advice for considering climate change in conservation planning. In particular, we discuss how stating explicit objectives related to climate change adaptation, quantifying uncertainty, and exploring trade-offs will better place conservation plans to meet objectives for multiple goals such as protection of species, ecosystems, geophysical diversity and ecological processes.

Decision support framework for the prioritization of coral reefs in the U.S. Virgin Islands

Pittman SJ, Poti M, Jeffrey CFG, Kracker LM, Mabrouk A. Decision support framework for the prioritization of coral reefs in the U.S. Virgin Islands. Ecological Informatics [Internet]. 2017 . Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1574954117300614
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

The coral reef ecosystems of the U.S. Virgin Islands are some of the most intensively surveyed and threatened tropical ecosystems on earth. These coral reefs vary widely in terms of biophysical structure, seascape context, socio-economic value and exposure to threats presenting a complex challenge for resilience-based management. How and where should managers prioritize actions to maximize conservation outcomes? To meet multiple conservation objectives, a novel map-based decision-support tool was designed which synthesized large amounts of data to help managers identify and rank coral reefs according to multiple ecological qualities, ecosystem services and threats. The spatial framework integrates local expert knowledge from SCUBA divers, scientific field data and spatial models to characterize and rank priority coral reefs. With user-defined flexibility, the tool provides information to guide management processes such as risk assessments of coastal development, management of protected areas, site selection in science and monitoring design, broader marine spatial planning and community education and outreach.

Chaos, conflict and change: The reemergence and evolution of fishery governance in the small scale fisheries of Somalia

Pollnac RB, Hagos KW, Crawford BR, Dahir AMohamed, Yusuf HHaji, Hussein AMohamed. Chaos, conflict and change: The reemergence and evolution of fishery governance in the small scale fisheries of Somalia. Ocean & Coastal Management [Internet]. 2017 . Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S096456911730039X
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article
  • Presents perceptions of governance systems impacting the small-scale fishery.
  • Presents perceptions of foreign fishing activities in Somalia's waters.
  • Examines perceptions of the influence of Somalian piracy on the fishery.
  • Explores factors related to compliance in the evolving fishery governance system.
  • Tests of a model of compliance indicate significant interregional variability.

Uncertainty, complexity and controversy in dolphin threat management: A role for post-normal science?

Palliser A, Dodson G. Uncertainty, complexity and controversy in dolphin threat management: A role for post-normal science?. Environmental Science & Policy [Internet]. 2017 ;78:74 - 80. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1462901117305361
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

Managing fishing threats to populations of endemic, threatened Hector’s and Māui dolphins around New Zealand is a complex and controversial issue, underpinned by uncertain scientific knowledge. As such, it can be argued that it falls into the realm of post-normal science, which advocates transparency about uncertainties and stakeholder peer review of knowledge feeding into decision-making. This paper focuses on selected examples of modelling and risk assessment research relating to Hector’s and Māui dolphin threat management. It explores how knowledge is developed, shared and utilised by decision-makers, finding that uncertain scientific knowledge may be shared in ways that make it appear more certain, with some of the subjectivities involved in knowledge production hidden from view. Interviews with stakeholders illustrate how some stakeholders are aware of the subjectivities involved when uncertain knowledge underpins decision-making, so a lack of transparency may be leading to erosion of social trust in decisions made. This in turn can lead to a lack of support for dolphin conservation measures from key stakeholders such as the commercial fishing industry. The paper concludes that while moves towards increasing transparency and stakeholder involvement are apparent, a deeper embrace of post-normal science approaches to knowledge production and dissemination would contribute to effective dolphin threat management in New Zealand.

Temporal dynamic of reef benthic communities in two marine protected areas in the Caribbean

Perera-Valderrama S, Hernández-Arana H, Ruiz-Zárate M-Á, Alcolado PM, Caballero-Aragón H, González-Cano J, Vega-Zepeda A, Victoria-Salazar I, Cobián-Rojas D, González-Méndez J, et al. Temporal dynamic of reef benthic communities in two marine protected areas in the Caribbean. Journal of Sea Research [Internet]. 2017 ;128:15 - 24. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1385110116303240
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

This study assessed the coral reef condition of two marine protected areas in the Caribbean: Guanahacabibes National Park, Cuba, and Costa Occidental de Isla Mujeres-Punta Cancun-Punta Nizuc National Park, Mexico, in a two-year period. The analyzed indicators for corals were live coral cover, diameter and height of the colonies, ancient and recent mortalities and abundance of recruits, which were evaluated in quadrats of 1 m2. In addition, it was estimated the coverage by morphofunctional groups of macroalgae in 25 × 25 cm quadrats and the density of the Diadema antillarum urchin in 1 m2 quadrats. The results showed differences between countries at broad spatial scales (hundreds of kilometers). Reefs of both MPAs seem to be in different stages of changes, which have been associated with deterioration of Caribbean reefs, toward the dominance of more resistant, non-tridimensional coral species, causing a decrease of the reef complexity that may leads to the reefs to collapse. At scales of kilometers (within MPAs), a similar pattern was found in reefs of GNP-Cuba and different trends were observed in reefs of CNP-Mexico. The observed differences between CNP-Mexico sites appear to be associated with the current tourism use patterns.

Marine Spatial Planning in the North Sea—Are National Policies and Legal Structures Compatible Enough? The Case of Norway and the Netherlands

Platjouw FMaria. Marine Spatial Planning in the North Sea—Are National Policies and Legal Structures Compatible Enough? The Case of Norway and the Netherlands. The International Journal of Marine and Coastal Law [Internet]. 2017 . Available from: http://booksandjournals.brillonline.com/content/journals/10.1163/15718085-12320075
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $30.00
Type: Journal Article

Marine spatial planning is an important tool to achieve a more ecosystem-based governance approach to marine ecosystems. Marine ecosystems often transcend national jurisdictional boundaries, so the compatibility of national policies and legal structures are important prerequisites for transboundary marine spatial planning. This article explores marine spatial planning in the North Sea ecosystem and analyses whether national policies and legal structures in the Netherlands and Norway are compatible enough. Both countries have an extensive body of law regulating the different uses of the North Sea and have also developed integrated management approaches for ‘their’ respective parts of the North Sea. The article demonstrates that marine spatial planning in regional sea areas is complicated when national legal frameworks and governance structures and traditions are very different.

Offshore wind farm in marine spatial planning and the stakeholders engagement: Opportunities and challenges for Taiwan

Zhang Y, Zhang C, Chang Y-C, Liu W-H, Zhang Y. Offshore wind farm in marine spatial planning and the stakeholders engagement: Opportunities and challenges for Taiwan. Ocean & Coastal Management [Internet]. 2017 ;149:69 - 80. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0964569117302648
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

Taiwan has advantages in the development of offshore wind power, as it has abundant wind energy resources at the seas. The local government has developed a series of measures to promote the development of wind power generation industry. The development of offshore wind farm in Taiwan, however, has to solve the problems that offshore wind farms are overlapping with some traditional fishing grounds and are unable to reach consensus with relevant stakeholders. This paper starts from the great potential of offshore wind power in Taiwan and the active promotion of the government, and analyses the impact and possible opportunities brought by offshore wind farm development to local fisheries, from the perspective of Zhanghua Area, a key area of development of offshore wind farm in Taiwan. This paper proposes that the local government in Taiwan should use marine spatial planning as a tool, through the comprehensive participation of government, developers, fishermen and other bodies, seeking the coexistence and prosperity of offshore wind farm and fisheries. Avoidance, compensation, and feedback, as well as communication and collaboration will be an important strategy to solve the conflicts of multiple use of the sea and to promote the development of marine renewable energy.

3D Spatial Conservation Prioritisation: Accounting for depth in marine environments

Venegas-Li R, Levin N, Possingham H, Kark S. 3D Spatial Conservation Prioritisation: Accounting for depth in marine environments. Methods in Ecology and Evolution [Internet]. 2017 . Available from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/2041-210X.12896/
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $38.00
Type: Journal Article
  1. While marine environments are three-dimensional (3D) in nature, current approaches and tools for planning and prioritising actions in the ocean are predominantly two-dimensional. Here, we develop a novel 3D marine spatial conservation prioritisation approach, which explicitly accounts for the inherent vertical heterogeneity of the ocean. This enables both vertical and horizontal spatial prioritisation to be performed simultaneously. To our knowledge, this is the first endeavour to develop prioritisation of conservation actions in 3D.
  2. We applied the 3D spatial conservation prioritisation approach to the Mediterranean Sea as a case study. We first subdivided the Mediterranean Sea into 3D planning units by assigning them a z coordinate (representing depth). We further partitioned these 3D planning units vertically into three depth layers; this allowed us to quantify biodiversity (1,011 species and 19 geomorphic features) and the cost of conservation actions at different depths. We adapted the prioritisation software Marxan to identify 3D networks of sites where biodiversity conservation targets are achieved for the minimum cost.
  3. Using the 3D approach presented here, we identified networks of sites where conservation targets for all biodiversity features were achieved. Importantly, these networks included areas of the ocean where only particular depth layers along the water column were identified as priorities for conservation. The 3D approach also proved to be more cost efficient than the traditional 2D approach. Spatial priorities within the networks of sites selected were considerably different when comparing the 2D and 3D approaches.
  4. Prioritising in 3D allows conservation and marine spatial planners to target specific threats to specific conservation features, at specific depths in the ocean. This provides a platform to further integrate systematic conservation planning into the wider ongoing and future marine spatial planning and ocean zoning processes.

Seabird diets as bioindicators of Atlantic herring recruitment and stock size: a new tool for ecosystem-based fisheries management

Scopel LC, Diamond AW, Kress SW, Hards AR, Shannon P. Seabird diets as bioindicators of Atlantic herring recruitment and stock size: a new tool for ecosystem-based fisheries management. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences [Internet]. 2017 . Available from: http://www.nrcresearchpress.com/doi/10.1139/cjfas-2017-0140
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $30.00
Type: Journal Article

Ecosystem-based fishery management requires understanding of relationships between exploited fish and their predators, such as seabirds. We used exploratory regression analyses to model relationships between Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) in the diet of seabird chicks at nine nesting colonies in the Gulf of Maine, and four types of fishery- and survey-derived herring data. We found several strong relationships, which suggests spatial structuring in herring stocks and likely patterns of herring movements before they recruit into the fishery. Some types of herring data seldom used in stock assessments – notably acoustic surveys, fixed-gear landings, and weight-at-age – correlated as strongly with seabird data as more commonly used series, such as mobile-gear landings and modeled spawning stock biomass. Seabird chick diets collected at specific locations thus offer a promising means to assess the size, distribution, and abundance of juvenile herring across a broad area prior to recruitment, which is a major source of uncertainty in fisheries. Common terns showed the most potential as a bioindicator, correlating well and showing consistent spatial patterns with 11 of 13 fishery data series.

North American Marine Protected Area Rapid Vulnerability Assessment Tool

Anon. North American Marine Protected Area Rapid Vulnerability Assessment Tool. Montreal, Canada: Commission for Environmental Cooperation; 2017. Available from: http://www3.cec.org/islandora/en/item/11733-north-american-marine-protected-area-rapid-vulnerability-assessment-tool
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Report

The North American Marine Protected Area Rapid Vulnerability Assessment Tool was created to help marine protected area managers evaluate the implications of climate change for the habitats of their sites. This tool has three parts (a user guide, a set of blank worksheets, and a booklet containing sample completed worksheets) that are available as downloadable PDFs. The blank worksheets are in a dynamic PDF format so that users can easily fill, save and share their completed worksheets. The User Guide and sample worksheets provide the narrative explanation of how to use the tool, while the blank worksheets are the hands-on component. Together, they comprise a tool that can help marine protected area managers conduct a rapid vulnerability assessment and adaptation strategy development process.

Ecological criteria to identify areas for biodiversity conservation

Asaad I, Lundquist CJ, Erdmann MV, Costello MJ. Ecological criteria to identify areas for biodiversity conservation. Biological Conservation [Internet]. 2017 ;213:309 - 316. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S000632071630533X
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

A challenge in implementing biodiversity conservation is in reconciling criteria for identifying significant areas and representative networks for biodiversity protection. Many international environmental initiatives include biological, ecological, economic, social and governance criteria to aid selection of areas for biodiversity conservation. Here we reviewed criteria used by 15 international initiatives, and what minimum set of biodiversity variables would be needed to support them. From a range of ecological and biological criteria, we identified eight criteria commonly used to identify areas for biodiversity conservation across these initiatives. Four criteria identified areas that (1) contained unique and rare habitats; (2) included fragile and sensitive habitats; (3) were important for ecological integrity; and (4) were representative of all habitats. Another four criteria were based on species' attributes, including (5) the presence of species of conservation concern; (6) the occurrence of restricted-range species; (7) species richness; and (8) importance for life history stages. Information required to inform these criteria include: habitat cover, species occurrence, species richness, species' geographic range and population abundance. This synthesized set of ecological and biological criteria, and their biodiversity variables will simplify the process to identify additional areas of high biodiversity significance, that in turn support achieving the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) targets to fill gaps in the representativeness of the global coverage of protected areas.

Contribution of citizen science towards international biodiversity monitoring

Chandler M, See L, Copas K, Bonde AMZ, López BClaramunt, Danielsen F, Legind JKristoffer, Masinde S, Miller-Rushing AJ, Newman G, et al. Contribution of citizen science towards international biodiversity monitoring. Biological Conservation [Internet]. 2017 ;213:280 - 294. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006320716303639
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

To meet collective obligations towards biodiversity conservation and monitoring, it is essential that the world's governments and non-governmental organisations as well as the research community tap all possible sources of data and information, including new, fast-growing sources such as citizen science (CS), in which volunteers participate in some or all aspects of environmental assessments. Through compilation of a database on CS and community-based monitoring (CBM, a subset of CS) programs, we assess where contributions from CS and CBM are significant and where opportunities for growth exist. We use the Essential Biodiversity Variable framework to describe the range of biodiversity data needed to track progress towards global biodiversity targets, and we assess strengths and gaps in geographical and taxonomic coverage. Our results show that existing CS and CBM data particularly provide large-scale data on species distribution and population abundance, species traits such as phenology, and ecosystem function variables such as primary and secondary productivity. Only birds, Lepidoptera and plants are monitored at scale. Most CS schemes are found in Europe, North America, South Africa, India, and Australia. We then explore what can be learned from successful CS/CBM programs that would facilitate the scaling up of current efforts, how existing strengths in data coverage can be better exploited, and the strategies that could maximise the synergies between CS/CBM and other approaches for monitoring biodiversity, in particular from remote sensing. More and better targeted funding will be needed, if CS/CBM programs are to contribute further to international biodiversity monitoring.

Terrestrial degradation impacts on coral reef health: Evidence from the Caribbean

Roberts M, Hanley N, Williams S, Cresswell W. Terrestrial degradation impacts on coral reef health: Evidence from the Caribbean. Ocean & Coastal Management [Internet]. 2017 ;149:52 - 68. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0964569117303435
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

Coral reefs are in decline worldwide. While coral reef managers are limited in their ability to tackle global challenges, such as ocean warming, managing local threats can increase the resilience of coral reefs to these global threats. One such local threat is high sediment inputs to coastal waters due to terrestrial over-grazing. Increases in terrestrial sediment input into coral reefs are associated with increased coral mortality, reduced growth rates, and changes in species composition, as well as alterations to fish communities. We used general linear models to investigate the link between vegetation ground cover and tree biomass index, within a dry-forest ecosystem, to coral cover, fish communities and visibility in the case study site of Bonaire, Caribbean Netherlands. We found a positive relationship between ground cover and coral cover below 10 m depth, and a negative relationship between tree biomass index and coral cover below 10 m. Greater ground cover is associated to sediment anchored through root systems, and higher surface complexity, slowing water flow, which would otherwise transport sediment. The negative relationship between tree biomass index and coral cover is unexpected, and may be a result of the deep roots associated with dry-forest trees, due to limited availability of water, which therefore do not anchor surface sediment, or contribute to surface complexity. Our analysis provides evidence that coral reef managers could improve reef health through engaging in terrestrial ecosystem protection, for example by taking steps to reduce grazing pressures, or in restoring degraded forest ecosystems.

Jellyfish and other gelata as food for four penguin species - insights from predator-borne videos

Thiebot J-B, Arnould JPY, Gómez-Laich A, Ito K, Kato A, Mattern T, Mitamura H, Noda T, Poupart T, Quintana F, et al. Jellyfish and other gelata as food for four penguin species - insights from predator-borne videos. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment [Internet]. 2017 . Available from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/fee.1529/abstract
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $38.00
Type: Journal Article

Jellyfish and other pelagic gelatinous organisms (“gelata”) are increasingly perceived as an important component of marine food webs but remain poorly understood. Their importance as prey in the oceans is extremely difficult to quantify due in part to methodological challenges in verifying predation on gelatinous structures. Miniaturized animal-borne video data loggers now enable feeding events to be monitored from a predator's perspective. We gathered a substantial video dataset (over 350 hours of exploitable footage) from 106 individuals spanning four species of non-gelatinous-specialist predators (penguins), across regions of the southern oceans (areas south of 30°S). We documented nearly 200 cases of targeted attacks on carnivorous gelata by all four species, at all seven studied localities. Our findings emphasize that gelatinous organisms actually represent a widespread but currently under-represented trophic link across the southern oceans, even for endothermic predators, which have high energetic demands. The use of modern technological tools, such as animal-borne video data loggers, will help to correctly identify the ecological niche of gelata.

Tsunami-driven rafting: Transoceanic species dispersal and implications for marine biogeography

Carlton JT, Chapman JW, Geller JB, Miller JA, Carlton DA, McCuller MI, Treneman NC, Steves BP, Ruiz GM. Tsunami-driven rafting: Transoceanic species dispersal and implications for marine biogeography. Science [Internet]. 2017 ;357(6358):1402 - 1406. Available from: http://science.sciencemag.org/content/357/6358/1402
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $30.00
Type: Journal Article

The 2011 East Japan earthquake generated a massive tsunami that launched an extraordinary transoceanic biological rafting event with no known historical precedent. We document 289 living Japanese coastal marine species from 16 phyla transported over 6 years on objects that traveled thousands of kilometers across the Pacific Ocean to the shores of North America and Hawai‘i. Most of this dispersal occurred on nonbiodegradable objects, resulting in the longest documented transoceanic survival and dispersal of coastal species by rafting. Expanding shoreline infrastructure has increased global sources of plastic materials available for biotic colonization and also interacts with climate change–induced storms of increasing severity to eject debris into the oceans. In turn, increased ocean rafting may intensify species invasions.

New evidence of Hawaiian coral reef drowning in response to meltwater pulse-1A

Sanborn KL, Webster JM, Yokoyama Y, Dutton A, Braga JC, Clague DA, Paduan JB, Wagner D, Rooney JJ, Hansen JR. New evidence of Hawaiian coral reef drowning in response to meltwater pulse-1A. Quaternary Science Reviews [Internet]. 2017 ;175:60 - 72. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0277379117306728
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

Fossil coral reefs are valuable recorders of glacio-eustatic sea-level changes, as they provide key temporal information on deglacial meltwater pulses (MWPs). The timing, rate, magnitude, and meltwater source of these sea-level episodes remain controversial, despite their importance for understanding ocean-ice sheet dynamics during periods of abrupt climatic change. This study revisits the west coast of the Big Island of Hawaii to investigate the timing of the −150 m H1d terrace drowning off Kawaihae in response to MWP-1A. We present eight new calibrated 14C-AMS ages, which constrain the timing of terrace drowning to at or after 14.75 + 0.33/-0.42 kyr BP, coeval with the age of reef drowning at Kealakekua Bay (U-Th age 14.72 ± 0.10 kyr BP), 70 kms south along the west coast. Integrating the chronology with high-resolution bathymetry and backscatter data, detailed sedimentological analysis, and paleoenvironmental interpretation, we conclude the H1d terrace drowned at the same time along the west coast of Hawaii in response to MWP-1A. The timing of H1d reef drowning is within the reported uncertainty of the timing of MWP-1A interpreted from the IODP Expedition 310 Tahitian reef record.

Prey consumption by cetaceans reveals the importance of energy-rich food webs in the Bay of Biscay

Spitz J, Ridoux V, Trites AW, Laran S, Authier M. Prey consumption by cetaceans reveals the importance of energy-rich food webs in the Bay of Biscay. Progress in Oceanography [Internet]. 2017 . Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0079661117300903
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Ecosystem-based management requires a clear understanding of marine ecosystem functioning, particularly the transfer of energy (consumption) to higher trophic levels. However, robust estimates of consumption are generally hampered by a dearth of data for predators (diet and abundance), and by methodological weaknesses. We undertook a comprehensive assessment of energy requirements and prey consumption for the 10 most abundant cetacean species in the Bay of Biscay (northeastern Atlantic Ocean, France) by combining recent data on their abundances from aerial surveys, and diets from stomach content analyses. We also incorporated functional considerations to group prey and address interspecific differences in the cost of living of cetaceans that are independent of body size. Species considered included harbour porpoise, common dolphins, striped dolphins, bottlenose dolphins, long-finned pilot whales, Risso's dolphins, sperm whales, Cuvier's beaked whales, minke whales and fin whales. We used Monte Carlo resampling methods to estimate annual and seasonal (winter and summer) consumption over the continental shelf and slope—and found that small toothed whale populations (which were much more abundant than other cetacean groups) required about twice as much resources as baleen whales and deep-diving toothed whales combined. Our results show that small energy-rich schooling fish are the key prey group sustaining a large part of the cetacean community in the Bay of Biscay. The biomass removal of small energy-rich schooling fish by cetaceans is 6 times higher than removals of all other prey groups. High quality nutritional resources appear to be crucial to sustaining cetaceans and maintaining ecosystem functions and services in the Bay of Biscay, and should be carefully monitored.

Reviving the economy of the Mediterranean Sea: Actions for a Sustainable Future

Randone M, Di Carlo G, Costantini M. Reviving the economy of the Mediterranean Sea: Actions for a Sustainable Future. Rome, Italy: WWF Mediterranean Marine Initiative; 2017 p. 64. Available from: http://awsassets.wwfffr.panda.org/downloads/170927_rapport_reviving_mediterranean_sea_economy.pdf
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Report

In this report we have used two key concepts 1) ‘gross marine product’ (GMP), which can be compared to a country’s annual gross domestic product (GDP), and 2) ‘shared wealth fund’ which represents the total “asset” base of the ocean, to illustrate the economic value of the Mediterranean Sea which directly relies on healthy ocean assets.

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