Literature Library

Currently indexing 7519 titles

Fishmeal Application Induces Antibiotic Resistance Gene Propagation in Mariculture Sediment

Han Y, Wang J, Zhao Z, Chen J, Lu H, Liu G. Fishmeal Application Induces Antibiotic Resistance Gene Propagation in Mariculture Sediment. Environmental Science & Technology [Internet]. 2017 ;51(18):10850 - 10860. Available from: http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acs.est.7b02875
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $40.00
Type: Journal Article

Antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) are globally prevalent in mariculture sediment, and their presence is an issue of concern in the context of antibiotic use. Although large amounts of fishmeal have been released into the sediment, the role of fishmeal in ARG dissemination remains unclear. In this study, high-throughput ARG profiles in representative fishmeal products and the impact of fishmeal on the sediment resistome were investigated. A total of 132 unique ARGs and 4 mobile genetic elements (MGEs) were detected in five fishmeal products. ARG abundance and diversity in the mariculture microcosm sediment were significantly increased by the addition of fishmeal, and trends in ARG patterns correlated with the resident bacterial community in sediment (P < 0.05). After DNase treatment of fishmeal removed 84.3% of total ARGs, the remaining nutrients in fishmeal increased the relative abundance but not the diversity of ARGs in microcosm sediment. Our study has revealed for the first time that fishmeal itself is a major reservoir for ARGs, and the shift in the bacterial community induced by the nutrients in fishmeal is the main driver shaping the resistome in mariculture microcosm sediment. Our findings caution against the previously unperceived risk of ARG propagation in fishmeal-receiving ecosystems.

Exploring deep-water coral communities using environmental DNA

Everett MV, Park LK. Exploring deep-water coral communities using environmental DNA. Deep Sea Research Part II: Topical Studies in Oceanography [Internet]. 2017 . Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0967064517301546
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Environmental DNA (eDNA) sequencing has emerged as a valuable tool for biodiversity surveys, allowing identification of taxa that may be missed by more traditional methods. Deep-sea corals, while increasingly recognized as a valuable source of habitat in the deep-ocean, have traditionally been challenging to survey. Obstacles to traditional visual surveys of these animals include the expense and complexity inherent to working in the deep marine environment, as well as the existing taxonomic uncertainty and morphological variation which can make deep-sea octocorals difficult to identify visually to the species level. This study tests an eDNA protocol for identification of deep-sea octocorals from water samples collected during the E/V Nautilus 2016 cruise season. Using this protocol, we were able to sequence eDNA from octocorals, and use these data along with image data collected during the cruise to identify taxa to the species level in a variety of habitats. eDNA sampling has the potential to complement traditional deep-sea coral surveys by overcoming the difficulty in visually identifying deep-sea octocorals and characterizing their diversity.

Attraction and repulsion of mobile wild organisms to finfish and shellfish aquaculture: a review

Callier MD, Byron CJ, Bengtson DA, Cranford PJ, Cross SF, Focken U, Jansen HM, Kamermans P, Kiessling A, Landry T, et al. Attraction and repulsion of mobile wild organisms to finfish and shellfish aquaculture: a review. Reviews in Aquaculture [Internet]. 2017 . Available from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/raq.12208/full
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $38.00
Type: Journal Article

Knowledge of aquaculture–environment interactions is essential for the development of a sustainable aquaculture industry and efficient marine spatial planning. The effects of fish and shellfish farming on sessile wild populations, particularly infauna, have been studied intensively. Mobile fauna, including crustaceans, fish, birds and marine mammals, also interact with aquaculture operations, but the interactions are more complex and these animals may be attracted to (attraction) or show an aversion to (repulsion) farm operations with various degrees of effects. This review outlines the main mechanisms and effects of attraction and repulsion of wild animals to/from marine finfish cage and bivalve aquaculture, with a focus on effects on fisheries-related species. Effects considered in this review include those related to the provision of physical structure (farm infrastructure acting as fish aggregating devices (FADs) or artificial reefs (ARs), the provision of food (e.g. farmed animals, waste feed and faeces, fouling organisms associated with farm structures) and some farm activities (e.g. boating, cleaning). The reviews show that the distribution of mobile organisms associated with farming structures varies over various spatial (vertical and horizontal) and temporal scales (season, feeding time, day/night period). Attraction/repulsion mechanisms have a variety of direct and indirect effects on wild organisms at the level of individuals and populations and may have implication for the management of fisheries species and the ecosystem in the context of marine spatial planning. This review revealed considerable uncertainties regarding the long-term and ecosystem-wide consequences of these interactions. The use of modelling may help better understand consequences, but long-term studies are necessary to better elucidate effects.

The Economy of Shark Conservation in the Northeast Pacific: The Role of Ecotourism and Citizen Science

Mieras PA, Harvey-Clark C, Bear M, Hodgin G, Hodgin B. The Economy of Shark Conservation in the Northeast Pacific: The Role of Ecotourism and Citizen Science. Elsevier; 2017. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0065288117300093
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $31.50
Type: Book

Historically sharks have been seen either as a source of income through harvesting, or as a nuisance and danger. The economic value of sharks has traditionally been measured as the total value of sharks caught for liver oil, fins, or meat for consumption. Sharks have also been killed to near extinction in cases where they were seen as a threat to fisheries on other species. This is illustrated by the mass extermination of Basking Sharks (Cetorhinus maximus) in British Columbia. They were seen as a nuisance to fishermen as they got entangled in gill nets during the salmon fishing season. However with the development of the SCUBA diving industry, and ecotourism in general, increased awareness of the role sharks play in marine ecosystems has resulted in changes in how they are perceived and utilized. Despite an ongoing harvest of sharks such as the North Pacific Spiny Dogfish (Squalus suckleyi), sharks now generate economic value through SCUBA diving enthusiasts who travel the globe to see, swim with, and photograph them. The use of digital cameras and other digital media has brought sharks into households around the world and increased awareness of the conservation issues facing many species. This renewed appreciation has led to a better understanding of sharks by the public, resulting in advocates calling for better protections and conservation. In particular, a growing part of the SCUBA diving community wants to contribute to conservation and research projects, which has led to participation in citizen science projects. These projects provide scientific data but also gain ground as ecotourism activities, thus adding to both economic value of tourism and conservation efforts.

Conservation aquaculture: Shifting the narrative and paradigm of aquaculture's role in resource management

Froehlich HE, Gentry RR, Halpern BS. Conservation aquaculture: Shifting the narrative and paradigm of aquaculture's role in resource management. Biological Conservation [Internet]. 2017 ;215:162 - 168. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006320717307565
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

In the 21st century, aquaculture is generally characterized as a foe to conservation efforts. Yet, much has changed in the two seemingly disparate practices over the last two decades, motivating an updated evaluation of the scientific evidence for how aquaculture currently impacts conservation, as well as prospects for further alignment and research. Here we present a new perspective on conservation aquaculture, which we redefine as “the use of human cultivation of an aquatic organism for the planned management and protection of a natural resource.” Looking across scales of conservation aquaculture that include single species to ecosystem level benefits (and limitations), we highlight ways aquaculture has historically, and is currently being integrated into conservation (e.g., habitat restoration of oyster beds) and areas that could be improved for the protection of critical species and habitats (e.g., aquarium trade of coral reef species). With a more strategic focus, there appears to be notable conservation aquaculture potential via the cultivation of species for harvest that could provide wild harvest alleviation through replacement or supplement – particularly for over-exploited species – and/or ecosystem services, such as improved water quality and reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. Given that aquaculture is the fastest growing food industry on the planet, aligning farming practices with conservation objectives is particularly pressing to ensure that growth happens in the service of conservation in the most effective and sustainable way possible. The sheer potential of conservation aquaculture suggests a tale of redemption for aquaculture and opportunity for conservationists to bring in a new age of collaborative practices to address global issues.

Brain damage and behavioural disorders in fish induced by plastic nanoparticles delivered through the food chain

Mattsson K, Johnson EV, Malmendal A, Linse S, Hansson L-A, Cedervall T. Brain damage and behavioural disorders in fish induced by plastic nanoparticles delivered through the food chain. Scientific Reports [Internet]. 2017 ;7(1). Available from: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-10813-0
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The tremendous increases in production of plastic materials has led to an accumulation of plastic pollution worldwide. Many studies have addressed the physical effects of large-sized plastics on organisms, whereas few have focused on plastic nanoparticles, despite their distinct chemical, physical and mechanical properties. Hence our understanding of their effects on ecosystem function, behaviour and metabolism of organisms remains elusive. Here we demonstrate that plastic nanoparticles reduce survival of aquatic zooplankton and penetrate the blood-to-brain barrier in fish and cause behavioural disorders. Hence, for the first time, we uncover direct interactions between plastic nanoparticles and brain tissue, which is the likely mechanism behind the observed behavioural disorders in the top consumer. In a broader perspective, our findings demonstrate that plastic nanoparticles are transferred up through a food chain, enter the brain of the top consumer and affect its behaviour, thereby severely disrupting the function of natural ecosystems.

A new genus and species of abyssal sponge commonly encrusting polymetallic nodules in the Clarion-Clipperton Zone, East Pacific Ocean

Lim S-C, Wiklund H, Glover AG, Dahlgren TG, Tan K-S. A new genus and species of abyssal sponge commonly encrusting polymetallic nodules in the Clarion-Clipperton Zone, East Pacific Ocean. Systematics and Biodiversity [Internet]. 2017 . Available from: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14772000.2017.1358218
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The Clarion-Clipperton Zone (CCZ) in the East Pacific is a vast region targeted for deep-sea mineral exploration, for which there are almost no published taxonomic data. Here we describe Plenaster craigigen. nov. sp. nov. from depths of ∼4000 m in the eastern CCZ polymetallic nodule province. Despite over 40 years of intense exploration in the area, we reveal that P. craigi sp. nov. is the most abundant sponge and the most common metazoan encrusting on nodules in our study area at the eastern CCZ. It has a mean abundance of 15.3 ± 8.9 individuals per m2 across 11 stations in a 30 × 30 km study site nested within the Singapore exploration area. The white encrusting sponge is filled with spheroxyasters with occasional styles protruding the surface. Plenaster craigi sp. nov. is morphologically similar to genera from three different families in two orders: Timea (Timeidae; Tethyida); Hemiasterella and Leptosastra(Hemiasterellidae; Tethyida); and Paratimea (Stelligeridae; Axinellida). However, based on the molecular (COI and 28S) phylogenetic trees generated in this study, P. craigi sp. nov. was located in the Order Axinellida and appeared to be distant to Timea, Hemiasterella, Leptosastra, and Paratimea. We propose a new genus for our material to be placed provisionally in the family Stelligeridae, as it is the only family in the order Axinellida whose members possess euasters. This provisional placement may change when sequences of the type specimens of these genera and advanced phylogenetic reconstruction methods become available in the future. However, we have shown clearly that Plenaster gen. nov. is unique and distinct from all currently known taxa. Plenaster craigi sp. nov. being an abundant metazoan encrusting on nodule and easily identified filter-feeding animal is a potentially indicator species for future mining impacts in the eastern CCZ, and possibly across the entire CCZ.

Bioaccumulation of trace metals and total petroleum and genotoxicity responses in an edible fish population as indicators of marine pollution

D’Costa A, Shyama SK, Kumar MKPraveen. Bioaccumulation of trace metals and total petroleum and genotoxicity responses in an edible fish population as indicators of marine pollution. Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety [Internet]. 2017 ;142:22 - 28. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0147651317301938?via%3Dihub
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

The present study reports the genetic damage and the concentrations of trace metals and total petroleum hydrocarbons prevailing in natural populations of an edible fish, Arius arius in different seasons along the coast of Goa, India as an indicator of the pollution status of coastal water. Fish were collected from a suspected polluted site and a reference site in the pre-monsoon, monsoon and post-monsoon seasons. Physico-chemical parameters as well as the concentrations of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) and trace metals in the water and sediment as well as the tissues of fish collected from these sites were recorded. The genotoxicity status of the fish was assessed employing the micronucleus test and comet assay. A positive correlation (p<0.001) was observed between the tail DNA and micronuclei in all the fish collected. Multiple regression analysis revealed that tissue and environmental pollutant concentrations and genotoxicity were positively associated and higher in the tissues of the fish collected from the polluted site. Pollution indicators and genotoxicity tests, combined with other physiological or biochemical parameters represent an essential integrated approach for efficient monitoring of aquatic ecosystems in Goa.

Scale dependence of environmental controls on the functional diversity of coral reef fish communities

Yeager LA, Deith MCM, McPherson JM, Williams ID, Baum JK. Scale dependence of environmental controls on the functional diversity of coral reef fish communities. Global Ecology and Biogeography [Internet]. 2017 ;26(10):1177 - 1189. Available from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/geb.12628/abstract
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $38.00
Type: Journal Article

Aim

The functional composition of local assemblages is hypothesized to be controlled by hierarchical environmental filters, whereby the importance of different abiotic and biotic factors varies across both spatial scales and the different dimensions of functional diversity. We examine scale dependence in functional diversity–environment relationships with the ultimate aim of advancing models that predict the response of functional diversity to global change.

Location

Coral reefs surrounding 23 minimally disturbed central-western Pacific islands.

Time period

2010–2015.

Major taxa studied

Coral reef fishes.

Methods

We surveyed 1,423 reef sites using a standardized monitoring protocol and classified the 547 taxa encountered based on traits related to resource use, body size and behaviour. For each fish community, we calculated species richness and three metrics of functional diversity: functional richness, functional redundancy and functional evenness. We then built nested models at three spatial scales to evaluate the predictive power of environmental conditions over each component of functional diversity.

Results

Climatic variables (e.g., primary productivity) and geomorphic context (e.g., bathymetric slope) were more important in predicting functional diversity at coarse spatial scales. In contrast, local measures of habitat quality, including benthic complexity, depth and hard coral cover, were generally most important at finer scales. All diversity metrics were better predicted at coarser scales, but which predictors were important varied among metrics.

Main conclusions

The observed scale dependence in environmental predictors of functional diversity generally matches models of hierarchical filters on functional community assembly. Contrary to expectation, however, functional evenness and functional redundancy, which incorporate information on biomass distributions, were not better predicted at finer spatial scales. Instead, broad-scale variation in environmental variables was most important in predicting all components of functional diversity. Furthermore, the distinct responses of each functional diversity metric to environmental variation indicate that each measures a unique dimension of reef-fish diversity, and environmental change may affect each differently.

Connecting Teenagers to Coastal Sciences through Research and Education: Shark Fest Program

Clardy SD, Hendon JM. Connecting Teenagers to Coastal Sciences through Research and Education: Shark Fest Program. Southeastern Naturalist [Internet]. 2017 ;16(sp10):11 - 25. Available from: http://www.bioone.org/doi/abs/10.1656/058.016.0sp1006
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $10.00
Type: Journal Article

In 2010, the Marine Education Center collaborated with the Center for Fisheries Research and Development's Shark Research Program to design an educational program that combined research experiences and educational opportunities for teenage audiences. This program, Shark Fest, educates students about the sharks of the Mississippi Sound and engages them in scientific studies of shark populations and movements. This program has reached 398 participants in grades 7–12. During the program, students assist in conducting a population survey using a 152.4-m (500-ft) bottom longline with 50 hooks and fishing with a rod-and-reel. Students measure, weigh, determine sex, and identify to species all captured sharks, and tag those in good condition prior to release. Program participants also conduct water-quality sampling (salinity, temperature, dissolved oxygen, and water clarity) at each sample site for addition to the database. Students take a pre-test and post-test to assess the level of knowledge gained during the program. Results of a paired-sample t-test on 2015 pre-test and post-test data reflected a significant difference in pre-test (mean = 6.16, SD = 2.36) and post-test (mean = 8.54, SD = 1.93) scores (t[83] = -9.172, P < 0.0001), indicating an increase in content knowledge. Written and verbal post-participation assessments also highlighted a positive student experience. We conducted opportunistic interviews with several students 4 years after they were in the program and found evidence of retained knowledge along with positive overall impressions. Some participants stated that the experience influenced their career pursuits.

Healthier seas, healthier people - Socioeconomic benefits of Marine Protected Areas

Rodríguez-Rodríguez D, D K, C W. Healthier seas, healthier people - Socioeconomic benefits of Marine Protected Areas. [Internet]. 2017 ;(6). Available from: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0Bw8D-TFFFccxXzloQ09RNHRndTQ/view
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Newsletter
  • MPAs, primarily aimed to the conservation and restoration of nature, may provide, in parallel, some social and economic benefits.
  • Benefits are likely to occur at different time scales, which need to be identified to prevent or act against short-term losses.
  • Participatory approaches to MPA establishment and management, along with effective communication, lessen conflicts and enhance management effectiveness.

Software for improved field surveys of nesting marine turtles

Anastácio R, Gonzalez JM, Slater K, Pereira MJ. Software for improved field surveys of nesting marine turtles. Scientific Reports [Internet]. 2017 ;7(1). Available from: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-11245-6
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Field data are still recorded on paper in many worldwide beach surveys of nesting marine turtles. The data must be subsequently transferred into an electronic database, and this can introduce errors in the dataset. To minimize such errors, the “Turtles” software was developed and piloted to record field data by one software user accompanying one Tortuguero in Akumal beaches, Quintana Roo, Mexico, from June 1st to July 31st during the night patrols. Comparisons were made between exported data from the software with the paper forms entered into a database (henceforth traditional). Preliminary assessment indicated that the software user tended to record a greater amount of metrics (i.e., an average of 18.3 fields ± 5.4 sd vs. 8.6 fields ± 2.1 sd recorded by the traditional method). The traditional method introduce three types of “errors” into a dataset: missing values in relevant fields (40.1%), different answers for the same value (9.8%), and inconsistent data (0.9%). Only 5.8% of these (missing values) were found with the software methodology. Although only tested by a single user, the software may suggest increased efficacy and warrants further examination to accurately assess the merit of replacing traditional methods of data recording for beach monitoring programmes.

Coastal zone management in India − present status and future needs

Nayak S. Coastal zone management in India − present status and future needs. Geo-spatial Information Science [Internet]. 2017 ;20(2):174 - 183. Available from: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10095020.2017.1333715
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The coastal zone is a region where land, ocean and atmosphere interact and hence it is dynamic in nature. India has a long coastline which was not adequately monitored until the advent of the satellite remote sensing era in the 70s. India has a very robust remote sensing program that the Indian Remote Sensing Satellite (IRS) series of satellites were effectively used to monitor coastal habitats, landforms, shoreline, water quality, etc., and changes were identified during the last 40 years. The classification system for coastal habitats and the classification and geometric accuracies of products were standardized. Detailed information for mangroves communities and characteristics of coral reefs were generated. The high and low tide lines were delineated seamlessly for the entire coastline using satellite data. All these data were organized in a GIS and the coastal database for the entire country was created. Impacts of various hazards on such as cyclones, tsunami and sea level changes on coastal habitats were documented. Based on topography, shoreline changes and tides, coastal multi-hazard vulnerability maps were characterized by employing the elevation data derived from satellite data and were prepared for the coastline of India. The information on ocean color and sea surface temperature was used to generate potential fishery advisories, which are provided daily to fishermen. The coastal database was utilized effectively to identify coastal regulation zones, marine protected areas, vulnerable zones, etc. Various services for tsunami, fishery and coral reef bleaching were generated for societal benefits. It is planned to develop models for the coastal zone, so that impeding dangers and likely changes in the coastal zone can be predicted and suitable actions can be undertaken. It is necessary to integrate socio-economic data with the knowledge database of coastal zone to understand the impact of anthropogenic activities and the changing climate on the coastal zone.

Marine ecosystem restoration and biodiversity offset

Jacob C, Buffard A, Pioch S, Thorin S. Marine ecosystem restoration and biodiversity offset. Ecological Engineering [Internet]. 2017 . Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0925857417305177?via%3Dihub
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

The mitigation hierarchy is increasingly used in environmental policy as a way of reconciling economic development and biodiversity conservation. The principle of the mitigation hierarchy is to avoid, reduce and offset the environmental impacts arising from development projects by providing ecological gains through conservation or restoration measures. Most of the research on its implementation to date has focused on terrestrial ecosystems. In this study, we investigated the relevance of marine ecosystem restorationin meeting offset requirements. Stemming from a brief literature review on existing restoration techniques for marine ecosystems (e.g. coral reefs, seagrass meadows, macroalgae beds, ‘green’ marine construction, and marine sediment remediation) and our experience on Environmental Impact Assessments undertaken in mainland France and in its oversea territories, we discuss the main criteria ensuring a suitable use of ‘restoration’ practice regarding offset requirements. We then clarify the different levels of equivalence that should be met when designing offsets relying on ‘restoration’ techniques. This study aims to clarify to what extent the environmental impacts of economic activity on marine biodiversity can be offset through marine ecosystem restoration.

Impact of biology knowledge on the conservation and management of large pelagic sharks

Yokoi H, Ijima H, Ohshimo S, Yokawa K. Impact of biology knowledge on the conservation and management of large pelagic sharks. Scientific Reports [Internet]. 2017 ;7(1). Available from: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-09427-3?WT.feed_name=subjects_conservation
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Population growth rate, which depends on several biological parameters, is valuable information for the conservation and management of pelagic sharks, such as blue and shortfin mako sharks. However, reported biological parameters for estimating the population growth rates of these sharks differ by sex and display large variability. To estimate the appropriate population growth rate and clarify relationships between growth rate and relevant biological parameters, we developed a two-sex age-structured matrix population model and estimated the population growth rate using combinations of biological parameters. We addressed elasticity analysis and clarified the population growth rate sensitivity. For the blue shark, the estimated median population growth rate was 0.384 with a range of minimum and maximum values of 0.195–0.533, whereas those values of the shortfin mako shark were 0.102 and 0.007–0.318, respectively. The maturity age of male sharks had the largest impact for blue sharks, whereas that of female sharks had the largest impact for shortfin mako sharks. Hypotheses for the survival process of sharks also had a large impact on the population growth rate estimation. Both shark maturity age and survival rate were based on ageing validation data, indicating the importance of validating the quality of these data for the conservation and management of large pelagic sharks.

Restoring tides to reduce methane emissions in impounded wetlands: A new and potent Blue Carbon climate change intervention

Kroeger KD, Crooks S, Moseman-Valtierra S, Tang J. Restoring tides to reduce methane emissions in impounded wetlands: A new and potent Blue Carbon climate change intervention. Scientific Reports [Internet]. 2017 ;7(1). Available from: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-12138-4
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Coastal wetlands are sites of rapid carbon (C) sequestration and contain large soil C stocks. Thus, there is increasing interest in those ecosystems as sites for anthropogenic greenhouse gas emission offset projects (sometimes referred to as “Blue Carbon”), through preservation of existing C stocks or creation of new wetlands to increase future sequestration. Here we show that in the globally-widespread occurrence of diked, impounded, drained and tidally-restricted salt marshes, substantial methane (CH4) and CO2 emission reductions can be achieved through restoration of disconnected saline tidal flows. Modeled climatic forcing indicates that tidal restoration to reduce emissions has a much greater impact per unit area than wetland creation or conservation to enhance sequestration. Given that GHG emissions in tidally-restricted, degraded wetlands are caused by human activity, they are anthropogenic emissions, and reducing them will have an effect on climate that is equivalent to reduced emission of an equal quantity of fossil fuel GHG. Thus, as a landuse-based climate change intervention, reducing CH4 emissions is an entirely distinct concept from biological C sequestration projects to enhance C storage in forest or wetland biomass or soil, and will not suffer from the non-permanence risk that stored C will be returned to the atmosphere.

The dual impact of ecology and management on social incentives in marine common-pool resource systems

Klein ES, Barbier MR, Watson JR. The dual impact of ecology and management on social incentives in marine common-pool resource systems. Royal Society Open Science [Internet]. 2017 ;4(8):170740. Available from: http://rsos.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/4/8/170740
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Understanding how and when cooperative human behaviour forms in common-pool resource systems is critical to illuminating social–ecological systems and designing governance institutions that promote sustainable resource use. Before assessing the full complexity of social dynamics, it is essential to understand, concretely and mechanistically, how resource dynamics and human actions interact to create incentives and pay-offs for social behaviours. Here, we investigated how such incentives for information sharing are affected by spatial dynamics and management in a common-pool resource system. Using interviews with fishermen to inform an agent-based model, we reveal generic mechanisms through which, for a given ecological setting characterized by the spatial dynamics of the resource, the two ‘human factors’ of information sharing and management may heterogeneously impact various members of a group for whom theory would otherwise predict the same strategy. When users can deplete the resource, these interactions are further affected by the management approach. Finally, we discuss the implications of alternative motivations, such as equity among fishermen and consistency of the fleet's output. Our results indicate that resource spatial dynamics, form of management and level of depletion can interact to alter the sociality of people in common-pool resource systems, providing necessary insight for future study of strategic decision processes.

Diversity in thermal affinity among key piscivores buffers impacts of ocean warming on predator-prey interactions

Selden RL, Batt RD, Saba VS, Pinsky ML. Diversity in thermal affinity among key piscivores buffers impacts of ocean warming on predator-prey interactions. Global Change Biology [Internet]. 2017 . Available from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/gcb.13838/abstract
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $38.00
Type: Journal Article

Asymmetries in responses to climate change have the potential to alter important predator–prey interactions, in part by altering the location and size of spatial refugia for prey. We evaluated the effect of ocean warming on interactions between four important piscivores and four of their prey in the U.S. Northeast Shelf by examining species overlap under historical conditions (1968–2014) and with a doubling in CO2. Because both predator and prey shift their distributions in response to changing ocean conditions, the net impact of warming or cooling on predator–prey interactions was not determined a priori from the range extent of either predator or prey alone. For Atlantic cod, an historically dominant piscivore in the region, we found that both historical and future warming led to a decline in the proportion of prey species’ range it occupied and caused a potential reduction in its ability to exert top-down control on these prey. In contrast, the potential for overlap of spiny dogfish with prey species was enhanced by warming, expanding their importance as predators in this system. In sum, the decline in the ecological role for cod that began with overfishing in this ecosystem will likely be exacerbated by warming, but this loss may be counteracted by the rise in dominance of other piscivores with contrasting thermal preferences. Functional diversity in thermal affinity within the piscivore guild may therefore buffer against the impact of warming on marine ecosystems, suggesting a novel mechanism by which diversity confers resilience.

Unprecedented calcareous algal reefs in northern Taiwan merit high conservation priority

Liou C-Y, Yang S-Y, Chen CAllen. Unprecedented calcareous algal reefs in northern Taiwan merit high conservation priority. Coral Reefs [Internet]. 2017 . Available from: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00338-017-1619-0
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Crustose coralline algae (CCA) concretions, or reefs, are mainly found below 10 m in temperate waters (Ballesteros 2006) and rarely in subtropical and tropical oceans. However, a massive CCA reef occurs on tidal flats extending continuously along the coastline of Taoyuan City, Northwest Taiwan (25°07′00.11″N, 121°14′22.23″E to 24°59′19.34″N, 121°00′47.00″E) (Fig. 1a). It is approximately 27 km long and a maximum of 450 m wide with a large tidal range of 4 m (Fig. 1b; Electronic supplementary video). Carbon-14 dating indicates that the reef dates from around 7500 BP; it consists of some sediment-tolerant corals, such as Cyphastrea and Dipsastraea (Dai et al. 2009). From 4400 BP to the present, CCA genera, such as MesophyllumPhymatolithon, and Harveylithon, have contributed to the present algal reef through constant growth as stacked layers over the surface of the reef (Fig. 1c), which is porous (Fig. 1d). The Taoyuan CCA reef performs similar ecosystem functions to those of coral reefs. However, long-term industrial pollution and continuous habitat destruction by land reclamation for an industrial park (Liou 2017) and windmill constructions (Fig. 1b) threaten the future of this reef system. The discovery of a newly described endemic coral species, Polycanthus chaishanensis, two undescribed species of CCA (Fig. 1e), and changes in the composition of layers over time highlight the merit of prioritizing conservation of this unique ecosystem in Taiwan.

Ecotourism, climate change and reef fish consumption in Palau: Benefits, trade-offs and adaptation strategies

Wabnitz CCC, Cisneros-Montemayor AM, Hanich Q, Ota Y. Ecotourism, climate change and reef fish consumption in Palau: Benefits, trade-offs and adaptation strategies. Marine Policy [Internet]. 2017 . Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X17302063
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Type: Journal Article

Marine ecosystems play a central role in economic and social life in the Republic of Palau, a Small Island Developing State in the Western Pacific. Marine resources underpin subsistence and commercial fisheries, as well as tourism activities, contributing substantially to Palau's GDP and employment. Since 1992, Palau has been actively developing conservation initiatives to protect marine resources, promote ecotourism, and ensure revenue generation. Marine reserves represent a particularly important tool in the country's sustainable development strategy. In 2015, Palau designated 80% of its marine EEZ as a National Marine Sanctuary, with the remaining 20% slated for domestic fisheries. That same year, Palau received 160 thousand tourists, over 9 times the country's population. In early 2017, the President proposed a bill effectively limiting budget travel and actively promoting high-end tourism. This study uses a quantitative social-ecological model to explore policy scenarios involving tourism, marine conservation and local food security. While climate change had the largest expected impact on local ecosystems, reef fish consumption contributes considerably to future projected declines in marine resources. Therefore, for Palau to achieve its goals of boosting revenues while sustainably stewarding marine resources, it will be necessary to transfer some level of consumption from reef fish on to tuna and other pelagics. Such changes, which align with the current proposal of developing an offshore national fishery as part of the Sanctuary's management plan, may allow Palau to meet future seafood demand, while protecting reef systems and the industries that rely on them.

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