Literature Library

Currently indexing 7274 titles

A resourceful and adaptable method to obtain data on the status of seagrass meadows

Foster NR, Fotheringham DG, Brock DJ, Waycott M. A resourceful and adaptable method to obtain data on the status of seagrass meadows. Aquatic Botany [Internet]. 2017 ;141:17 - 21. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S030437701630184X
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

Coastline degradation, as well as subsequent ecosystem loss, has long been attributed to anthropogenic stress and is an all too familiar issue affecting coastal habitats. Should management and conservation efforts fail to improve the quality of coastal ecosystems and the services they provide, they may be irrevocably damaged. A significant limitation to conservation efforts is often the ability to track change in seagrass meadows due to the significant time and cost of monitoring efforts in underwater habitats. Remote sensing is often a tool used to improve our knowledge of habitat status, however, ground-truthing remote sensing results is difficult when historical data is required. We apply an innovative and resourceful approach to the attainment of data to check the status of seagrass meadows from resources that are available in many areas due to the collection of other data sets. We employ the use of underwater digital photographs originally taken for monitoring sediment movement patterns. We were successfully able to develop a method to critically and easily evaluate these photographs for habitat status, enabling the generation of a data set unable to be obtained in other ways. This method can further be utilised in a citizen science project, for other underwater digital photographs, to support the assessment of coastal submerged ecosystem habitat status.

Your evidence or mine? Systematic evaluation of reviews of marine protected area effectiveness

Woodcock P, O'Leary BC, Kaiser MJ, Pullin AS. Your evidence or mine? Systematic evaluation of reviews of marine protected area effectiveness. Fish and Fisheries [Internet]. 2017 ;18(4):668 - 681. Available from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/faf.12196/abstract
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $38.00
Type: Journal Article

Marine protected areas (MPAs) are a key strategy for mitigating the impacts of fisheries, but their designation can be controversial, and there is uncertainty surrounding when and where MPAs are most effective. Evidence synthesis that collates primary research on MPA effectiveness can provide a crucial bridge between research, policy and practice. However, reviews vary in scope and rigour, meaning decision-makers face the challenge of identifying appropriate reviews. Documenting differences amongst reviews can therefore support nonspecialists in locating the most relevant and rigorous reviews and can also assist researchers in targeting evidence gaps. We addressed these priorities by systematically searching for reviews examining effectiveness of MPAs for biodiversity, critically appraising methods used and categorizing review scope. The 27 reviews assessed overlapped in scope (suggesting some redundancy) and differed substantially in reliability. Key strengths related to the effects of MPAs on fish abundance and the influence of MPA size and age on effectiveness. However, several gaps were noted, with some questions not addressed and others lacking highly reliable syntheses – importantly, the latter may create the perception that particular questions have been adequately addressed, potentially deterring new syntheses. Our findings indicate key aspects of review conduct that could be improved (e.g. documenting critical appraisal of primary research, evaluating potential publication bias) and can facilitate evidence-based policy by guiding nonspecialists to the most reliable and relevant reviews. Lastly, we suggest that future reviews with broader taxonomic coverage and considering the influence of a wider range of MPA characteristics on effectiveness would be beneficial.

Redistribution of benefits but not defection in a fisheries bycatch-reduction management initiative

McClanahan TR, Kosgei JK. Redistribution of benefits but not defection in a fisheries bycatch-reduction management initiative. Conservation Biology [Internet]. 2017 . Available from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/cobi.12980/full
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $38.00
Type: Journal Article

Reducing the capture of small fish, discards, and by-catch is a primary concern of fisheries mangers that propose to maintain high yields, species diversity, and associated ecosystem functions. Modified fishing gear is one of the primary ways to reduce by-catch and capture of small fish. The outcomes of gear modification may depend on competition with other gears using similar fishing grounds and resources and the subsequent adoption or defection of fishers using modified gears. We evaluated the adoption, size, catch-per-unit-effort (CPUE), yield, and income responses among gears in a coral reef fishery where a 3-cm escape gap was introduced into traditional traps. The size of fish increased in the modified traps but the catch of smaller fish increased among the other competing gears. Additionally, there was no change in the overall CPUE, yields, or per area incomes but rather redistributions of yield benefits towards the competing gears. For example, estimated incomes of fishers that adopted the traps remained unchanged but increased for net and spear fishers. Fishers using escape-gap traps had a high proportion of income from larger fish, which may have led to a perception of benefits, high status, and no defections. The less polarizing neutral-win rather than a strong loss-win tradeoff outcome may explain the full adoption of escape-gap traps 3 years after their introduction. Trap fishers showed an interest in negotiating other management improvements, such as increased mesh sizes for nets, which could ultimately lead to catalyzing community-level decisions that would increase their own profits.

The quality of compliance: investigating fishers’ responses towards regulation and authorities

Boonstra WJ, Birnbaum S, Björkvik E. The quality of compliance: investigating fishers’ responses towards regulation and authorities. Fish and Fisheries [Internet]. 2017 ;18(4):682 - 697. Available from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/faf.12197/abstract
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $38.00
Type: Journal Article

A substantial amount of scientific effort goes into understanding and measuring compliance in fisheries. Understanding why, how and when fishers follow or violate rules is crucial for designing effective fishery policies that can halt overfishing. Non-compliance was initially explained almost exclusively with reference to economic and self-interested motivations. More recently, however, most explanations involve a combination of economic, social, political and environmental factors. Despite this recent development towards more holistic explanations, many scientists continue to frame the issue in binary terms: fishers either follow rules, or they don't. In this article we challenge this binary interpretation and focus attention on the diversity of fishers’ dispositions and perceptions that underpin compliant behaviour. To this aim we construct a typology of fishers’ responses towards regulation and authorities, thereby developing conceptual tools to understand different motivations and attitudes that underlie compliance outcomes. For this purpose, we identify the motivational postures of ‘creativity’ and ‘reluctance’, and then highlight their empirical relevance with an interview study of Swedish fishers. Reasons for studying the quality and diversity of fishers’ motivations and responses are not purely academic. Conceptualizing and observing the quality of compliance can help policymakers and managers gauge and anticipate the potentiality of non-compliant fishing practices that may threaten the resilience of marine ecosystems.

Informing management strategies for a reserve: Results from a discrete choice experiment survey

Xuan BBich, Sandorf EDancke, Aanesen M. Informing management strategies for a reserve: Results from a discrete choice experiment survey. Ocean & Coastal Management [Internet]. 2017 ;145:35 - 43. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0964569117300200
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

It is well-known that operating within the boundaries of a national park provides commercial actors with the opportunity to charge a price premium, though this has to a lesser degree been demonstrated for marine protected areas. We estimate national tourists' willingness-to-pay a price premium for boat trips in the Nha Trang Bay Marine Protected Are, Vietnam, using a discrete choice experiment. Our results show that tourists are willing to pay an average price premium of 18 USD per trip for a large improvement in environmental quality, and that avoiding the loss of jobs for local fishermen is of minor importance. Furthermore, the economic benefits generated from management scenarios that combine biodiversity restoration and environmental quality improvement within the reserve sufficient to cover additional costs of such improvements.

Innovating for change in global fisheries governance: an introduction

van der Marel ER, Caddell R, Johansen E. Innovating for change in global fisheries governance: an introduction. Marine Policy [Internet]. 2017 . Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X17304232
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

On 23 September 2016, a workshop entitled “Innovating for change in global fisheries governance” was held in Tromsø, hosted by the K. G. Jebsen Centre for the Law of the Sea (JCLOS) at the Faculty of Law of UiT, The Arctic University of Norway. The aim of the workshop was to address the following question: How can international law be used as an innovative mechanism for change in global fisheries governance? Seven of the papers presented at the workshop, each one addressing a particular aspect of this overarching question, are published here in this special issue of Marine Policy.

‘That's my livelihood, it's your fun’: The conflicting moral economies of commercial and recreational fishing

Boucquey N. ‘That's my livelihood, it's your fun’: The conflicting moral economies of commercial and recreational fishing. Journal of Rural Studies [Internet]. 2017 ;54:138 - 150. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0743016716301164
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $41.95
Type: Journal Article

Highlights

•Examines moral economies of commercial and recreational fishers.

•Moral economy discourses stem from material interactions with fishery resources and historical development patterns.

•Fishers have divergent definitions of value, waste, and public resources.

•Fisher moral economies have the potential to be encoded in fisheries policies, affecting material access to resources.

The forgone benefits of discarding fish in the Gulf of California shrimp fishery

Ibarra AAguilar. The forgone benefits of discarding fish in the Gulf of California shrimp fishery. Ocean & Coastal Management [Internet]. 2017 ;145:1 - 13. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0964569117304143
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

Fish discards represent a large share of harvested biomass in shrimp fisheries. The aim of this paper is to propose a methodology for valuing discards of both commercial and non-commercial fish species discarded in the Gulf of California shrimp fishery, by estimating the monetary value of forgone fish biomass. The value of commercial fish species was carried out by using growth and population models, in order to simulate the biomass that, if left in the ocean instead of being harvested at Age 0, could reach an optimal fishing size. Using deflated ex-vessel prices, the present value of commercial species hypothetically harvested at an optimal age, was computed. The value of non-commercial fish species represented the forgone benefits of not using discarded biomass for producing fishmeal. Hence, the estimated value of fish diversity discarded in trawling operations in 2013 would range between USD 60.80 million and USD 103.4 million. This estimate is one of the first attempts to give an economic value to both commercial and non-commercial discarded fish biomass. Hopefully, the methodology here proposed will serve as inspiration for further research in economic valuation of marine biodiversity.

Oil exposure disrupts early life-history stages of coral reef fishes via behavioural impairments

Johansen JL, Allan BJM, Rummer JL, Esbaugh AJ. Oil exposure disrupts early life-history stages of coral reef fishes via behavioural impairments. Nature Ecology & Evolution [Internet]. 2017 . Available from: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41559-017-0232-5
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Global demand for energy and oil-based products is progressively introducing petrogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) into sensitive marine environments, primarily from fossil-fuel exploration, transport, and urban and industrial runoff. These toxic pollutants are found worldwide, yet the long-term ecological effects on coral reef ecosystems are unknown. Here, we demonstrate that oil exposure spanning PAH concentrations that are environmentally relevant for many coastal marine ecosystems (≤5.7 μg l−1), including parts of the Great Barrier Reef, Red Sea, Asia and the Caribbean, causes elevated mortality and stunted growth rates in six species of pre-settlement coral reef fishes, spanning two evolutionarily distinct families (Pomacentridae and Lethrinidae). Furthermore, oil exposure alters habitat settlement and antipredator behaviours, causing reduced sheltering, shoaling and increased risk taking, all of which exacerbate predator-induced mortality during recruitment. These results suggest a previously unknown path, whereby oil and PAH exposure impair higher-order cognitive processing and behaviours necessary for the successful settlement and survival of larval fishes. This emphasizes the risks associated with industrial activities within at-risk ecosystems.

Global analysis of depletion and recovery of seabed biota after bottom trawling disturbance

Hiddink JGeert, Jennings S, Sciberras M, Szostek CL, Hughes KM, Ellis N, Rijnsdorp AD, McConnaughey RA, Mazor T, Hilborn R, et al. Global analysis of depletion and recovery of seabed biota after bottom trawling disturbance. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences [Internet]. 2017 :201618858. Available from: http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2017/07/11/1618858114.abstract
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Bottom trawling is the most widespread human activity affecting seabed habitats. Here, we collate all available data for experimental and comparative studies of trawling impacts on whole communities of seabed macroinvertebrates on sedimentary habitats and develop widely applicable methods to estimate depletion and recovery rates of biota after trawling. Depletion of biota and trawl penetration into the seabed are highly correlated. Otter trawls caused the least depletion, removing 6% of biota per pass and penetrating the seabed on average down to 2.4 cm, whereas hydraulic dredges caused the most depletion, removing 41% of biota and penetrating the seabed on average 16.1 cm. Median recovery times posttrawling (from 50 to 95% of unimpacted biomass) ranged between 1.9 and 6.4 y. By accounting for the effects of penetration depth, environmental variation, and uncertainty, the models explained much of the variability of depletion and recovery estimates from single studies. Coupled with large-scale, high-resolution maps of trawling frequency and habitat, our estimates of depletion and recovery rates enable the assessment of trawling impacts on unprecedented spatial scales.

An invasive foundation species enhances multifunctionality in a coastal ecosystem

Ramus AP, Silliman BR, Thomsen MS, Long ZT. An invasive foundation species enhances multifunctionality in a coastal ecosystem. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences [Internet]. 2017 :201700353. Available from: http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2017/07/11/1700353114
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $10.00
Type: Journal Article

While invasive species often threaten biodiversity and human well-being, their potential to enhance functioning by offsetting the loss of native habitat has rarely been considered. We manipulated the abundance of the nonnative, habitat-forming seaweed Gracilaria vermiculophylla in large plots (25 m2) on southeastern US intertidal landscapes to assess impacts on multiple ecosystem functions underlying coastal ecosystem services. We document that in the absence of native habitat formers, this invasion has an overall positive, density-dependent impact across a diverse set of ecosystem processes (e.g., abundance and richness of nursery taxa, flow attenuation). Manipulation of invader abundance revealed both thresholds and saturations in the provisioning of ecosystem functions. Taken together, these findings call into question the focus of traditional invasion research and management that assumes negative effects of nonnatives, and emphasize the need to consider context-dependence and integrative measurements when assessing the impact of an invader, including density dependence, multifunctionality, and the status of native habitat formers. This work supports discussion of the idea that where native foundation species have been lost, invasive habitat formers may be considered as sources of valuable ecosystem functions.

Detection and Monitoring of Oil Spills Using Moderate/High-Resolution Remote Sensing Images

Li Y, Cui C, Liu Z, Liu B, Xu J, Zhu X, Hou Y. Detection and Monitoring of Oil Spills Using Moderate/High-Resolution Remote Sensing Images. Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology [Internet]. 2017 ;73(1):154 - 169. Available from: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00244-016-0358-5
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Current marine oil spill detection and monitoring methods using high-resolution remote sensing imagery are quite limited. This study presented a new bottom-up and top-down visual saliency model. We used Landsat 8, GF-1, MAMS, HJ-1 oil spill imagery as dataset. A simplified, graph-based visual saliency model was used to extract bottom-up saliency. It could identify the regions with high visual saliency object in the ocean. A spectral similarity match model was used to obtain top-down saliency. It could distinguish oil regions and exclude the other salient interference by spectrums. The regions of interest containing oil spills were integrated using these complementary saliency detection steps. Then, the genetic neural network was used to complete the image classification. These steps increased the speed of analysis. For the test dataset, the average running time of the entire process to detect regions of interest was 204.56 s. During image segmentation, the oil spill was extracted using a genetic neural network. The classification results showed that the method had a low false-alarm rate (high accuracy of 91.42%) and was able to increase the speed of the detection process (fast runtime of 19.88 s). The test image dataset was composed of different types of features over large areas in complicated imaging conditions. The proposed model was proved to be robust in complex sea conditions.

Learning, adaptation, and the complexity of human and natural interactions in the ocean

Wilson J. Learning, adaptation, and the complexity of human and natural interactions in the ocean. Ecology and Society [Internet]. 2017 ;22(2). Available from: https://www.ecologyandsociety.org/vol22/iss2/art43/
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Here, I explore the system-level consequences of learning and adaptation among fish and fishers. The fundamental idea is that the cost of acquiring the knowledge needed to resolve uncertainty is the principal driver of social and spatial organization. This cost limits agents’ actions and leads them to prefer relatively persistent associations with familiar agents and places. When all agents act in this way, the regularity and self-reinforcing nature of familiarity leads to the emergence of a self-organized system. Systems like this are characterized by diverse, place-based, and relatively durable groups, groups of groups, and rough hierarchical structure. This occurs in both the natural and human parts of the system. The costs of resolving uncertainty also determine the interactions of fish and fishers. The uncertainty of search leads fishers preferentially to target older fish and aggregations of fish. These are the repositories and mechanisms for the replication of the knowledge needed for self-organization. The loss of this information selectively, but unintentionally, disrupts the behavioral regularity that organizes the natural system, leading eventually to its disorganization. From this theoretical perspective, sustainable fishing requires conservation of the knowledge in DNA and memory because this is the fundamental basis for the self-organization of the natural system. Collective action is also subject to the costs of resolving uncertainty. In complex systems, these costs are minimized at the local level in the system, where the most direct, but not the only, feedback occurs. This implies the need for multiscale governance with an emphasis on collective learning through localized science and user participation. Finally, the complexity of ecosystem interactions argues for qualitative harvesting rules governing how, when, and where fishing takes place. These rules are most likely to generate a persistent signal and rapid learning, but only when combined with effective governance.

Challenges to Oil Spill Assessment for Seabirds in the Deep Ocean

J. Haney C, Jodice PGR, Montevecchi WA, Evers DC. Challenges to Oil Spill Assessment for Seabirds in the Deep Ocean. Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology [Internet]. 2017 ;73(1):33 - 39. Available from: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00244-016-0355-8
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

We synthesize impediments for evaluating effects to seabirds from open ocean hydrocarbon releases. Effects on seabirds from ship discharges, spills, and well blowouts often are poorly detected and monitored far from land. Regulatory regimes for ocean spills can result in monitoring efforts that are not entirely transparent. We illustrate how interdisciplinary technologies address defi- cits that hamper individual or population level assessments for seabirds, and we demonstrate where emerging technologies might be engaged to bridge gaps in oil spill monitoring. Although acute mortality from direct oil exposure poses the greatest risk to seabirds, other hazards from light-attraction, flaring, collisions, chronic pollution, and hydrocarbon inhalation around oil infrastructure also may induce bird mortality in the deep ocean.

Increasing transnational sea-ice exchange in a changing Arctic Ocean

Newton R, Pfirman S, Tremblay B, DeRepentigny P. Increasing transnational sea-ice exchange in a changing Arctic Ocean. Earth's Future [Internet]. 2017 ;5(6):633 - 647. Available from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016EF000500/full
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The changing Arctic sea-ice cover is likely to impact the trans-border exchange of sea ice between the exclusive economic zones (EEZs) of the Arctic nations, affecting the risk of ice-rafted contamination. We apply the Lagrangian Ice Tracking System (LITS) to identify sea-ice formation events and track sea ice to its melt locations. Most ice (52%) melts within 100 km of where it is formed; ca. 21% escapes from its EEZ. Thus, most contaminants will be released within an ice parcel's originating EEZ, while material carried by over 1 00,000 km2 of ice—an area larger than France and Germany combined—will be released to other nations' waters. Between the periods 1988–1999 and 2000–2014, sea-ice formation increased by ∼17% (roughly 6 million km2 vs. 5 million km2 annually). Melting peaks earlier; freeze-up begins later; and the central Arctic Ocean is more prominent in both formation and melt in the later period. The total area of ice transported between EEZs increased, while transit times decreased: for example, Russian ice reached melt locations in other nations' EEZs an average of 46% faster while North American ice reached destinations in Eurasian waters an average of 37% faster. Increased trans-border exchange is mainly a result of increased speed (∼14% per decade), allowing first-year ice to escape the summer melt front, even as the front extends further north. Increased trans-border exchange over shorter times is bringing the EEZs of the Arctic nations closer together, which should be taken into account in policy development—including establishment of marine-protected areas.

Plain Language Summary

We use data from satellite images to identify the formation, drift tracks, and melt locations of sea ice in the Arctic. Most ice melts locally: only about 21% is exported from the exclusive economic zone (EEZ) in which it is formed. That export is nonetheless about 1,000,000 km2 each year. As the ice cover has thinned and the summer sea ice has retreated in a warming Arctic, formation and melt locations have moved further north, ice drifts have accelerated, and the area of ice formation and melt has increased. We looked at ice formation and transport between the EEZs of the Arctic nations, and broke the record into two periods: 1988–1999 and 2000–2014. As the Arctic warms, more ice is transported between EEZs and it is arriving at the receiving EEZ faster, than in the past. Between the two study periods: Sea ice velocity increased by about 14%/decade; Russian ice reached melt locations in other nations' EEZs 46% faster; and North American ice reached Eurasian destinations 37% faster. Exchanges of ice have increased as a result. For example, export of ice from Russia to Norway increased by 11% and export from Alaska to Russia by 16%.

Effects of economics and demographics on global fisheries sustainability

Ding Q, Wang Y, Chen X, Chen Y. Effects of economics and demographics on global fisheries sustainability. Conservation Biology [Internet]. 2017 ;31(4):799 - 808. Available from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/cobi.12873/abstract
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $38.00
Type: Journal Article

A good understanding of social factors that lead to marine ecological change is important to developing sustainable global fisheries. We used balanced panel models and conducted cross-national time-series analyses (1970–2010) of 122 nations to examine how economic prosperity and population growth affected the sustainability of marine ecosystems. We used catches in economic exclusive zone (EEZ); mean trophic level of fishery landings (MTL); primary production required to sustain catches (expressed as percentage of local primary production [%PPR]); and an index of ecosystem overfishing (i.e., the loss in secondary production index [L index]) as indicators of ecological change in marine ecosystems. The EEZ catch, %PPR, and L index declined gradually after gross domestic product (GDP) per capita reached $15,000, $14,000, and $19,000, respectively, and MTL increased steadily once GDP per capita exceeded $20,000. These relationships suggest that economic growth and biodiversity conservation are compatible goals. However, increasing human populations would degrade marine ecosystems. Specifically, a doubling of human population caused an increase in the %PPR of 17.1% and in the L index of 0.0254 and a decline in the MTL of 0.176. A 1% increase in human population resulted in a 0.744% increase in EEZ catch. These results highlight the importance of considering social and economic factors in developing sustainable fisheries management policy.

Shallow ponds are heterogeneous habitats within a temperate salt marsh ecosystem

Spivak AC, Gosselin K, Howard E, Mariotti G, Forbrich I, Stanley R, Sylva SP. Shallow ponds are heterogeneous habitats within a temperate salt marsh ecosystem. Journal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences [Internet]. 2017 ;122(6):1371 - 1384. Available from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JG003780/full
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $38.00
Type: Journal Article

Integrating spatial heterogeneity into assessments of salt marsh biogeochemistry is becoming increasingly important because disturbances that reduce plant productivity and soil drainage may contribute to an expansion of shallow ponds. These permanently inundated and sometimes prominent landscape features can exist for decades, yet little is known about pond biogeochemistry or their role in marsh ecosystem functioning. We characterized three ponds in a temperate salt marsh (MA, USA) over alternating periods of tidal isolation and flushing, during summer and fall, by evaluating the composition of plant communities and organic matter pools and measuring surface water oxygen, temperature, and conductivity. The ponds were located in the high marsh and had similar depths, temperatures, and salinities. Despite this, they had different levels of suspended particulate, dissolved, and sediment organic matter and abundances of phytoplankton, macroalgae, and Ruppia maritima. Differences in plant communities were reflected in pond metabolism rates, which ranged from autotrophic to heterotrophic. Integrating ponds into landcover-based estimates of marsh metabolism resulted in slower rates of net production (−8.1 ± 0.3 to −15.7 ± 0.9%) and respiration (−2.9 ± 0.5 to −10.0 ± 0.4%), compared to rates based on emergent grasses alone. Seasonality had a greater effect on pond water chemistry, organic matter pools, and algal abundances than tidal connectivity. Alternating stretches of tidal isolation and flushing did not affect pond salinities or algal communities, suggesting that exchange between ponds and nearby creeks was limited. Overall, we found that ponds are heterogeneous habitats and future expansion could reduce landscape connectivity and the ability of marshes to capture and store carbon.

Seagrass blue carbon dynamics in the Gulf of Mexico: Stocks, losses from anthropogenic disturbance, and gains through seagrass restoration

Thorhaug A, Poulos HM, López-Portillo J, Ku TCW, Berlyn GP. Seagrass blue carbon dynamics in the Gulf of Mexico: Stocks, losses from anthropogenic disturbance, and gains through seagrass restoration. Science of The Total Environment [Internet]. 2017 ;605-606:626 - 636. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S004896971731608X?via%3Dihub
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $41.95
Type: Journal Article

Seagrasses comprise a substantive North American and Caribbean Sea blue carbon sink. Yet fine-scale estimates of seagrass carbon stocks, fluxes from anthropogenic disturbances, and potential gains in sedimentary carbon from seagrass restoration are lacking for most of the Western Hemisphere. To begin to fill this knowledge gap in the subtropics and tropics, we quantified organic carbon (Corg) stocks, losses, and gains from restorations at 8 previously-disturbed seagrass sites around the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) (n = 128 cores). Mean natural seagrass Corg stocks were 25.7 ± 6.7 Mg Corg ha− 1 around the GoM, while mean Corg stocks at adjacent barren sites that had previously hosted seagrass were 17.8 Mg Corg ha− 1. Restored seagrass beds contained a mean of 38.7 ± 13.1 Mg Corg ha− 1. Mean Corg losses differed by anthropogenic impact type, but averaged 20.98 ± 7.14 Mg Corg ha− 1. Corggains from seagrass restoration averaged 20.96 ± 8.59 Mg ha− 1. These results, when combined with the similarity between natural and restored Corg content, highlight the potential of seagrass restoration for mitigating seagrass Corg losses from prior impact events. Our GoM basin-wide estimates of natural Corg totaled ~ 36.4 Tg for the 947,327 ha for the USA-GoM. Including Mexico, the total basin contained an estimated 37.2–37.5 Tg Corg. Regional US-GoM losses totaled 21.69 Tg Corg. Corg losses differed significantly among anthropogenic impacts. Yet, seagrass restoration appears to be an important climate change mitigation strategy that could be implemented elsewhere throughout the tropics and subtropics.

Marine Environmental Emergencies in the North Pacific Ocean: Lessons Learned from Recent Oil Spills

Yim UHyuk, Short J. Marine Environmental Emergencies in the North Pacific Ocean: Lessons Learned from Recent Oil Spills. Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology [Internet]. 2017 ;73(1):1 - 4. Available from: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00244-017-0416-7
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Increasing marine vessel traffic, and oil and gas exploration and development throughout the North Pacific basin brings increasing risks of oil spills. Recognizing the serious challenges presented to response authorities, this Special Issue was organized by the North Pacific Marine Science Organization to provide an introduction to the current state of scientific understanding regarding the environmental effects of oil spills. Because interactions of spilled oils with biota and their habitats are complex, the most serious environmental damages from these spills are not necessarily those of greatest immediate concern by the public. Our overarching goal for this Special Issue is to provide an efficient introduction to the most important ways that oil spills can harm biota, habitats, and ecosystems through invited, targeted mini-reviews augmented by original research articles. We provide a brief background on the challenges posed by large oil spills to response authorities, summarize findings from the articles published in this Special Issue, and highlight some key research needs.

Oil Spills and Marine Mammals in British Columbia, Canada: Development and Application of a Risk-Based Conceptual Framework

Rosenberger ALJarvela, MacDuffee M, Rosenberger AGJ, Ross PS. Oil Spills and Marine Mammals in British Columbia, Canada: Development and Application of a Risk-Based Conceptual Framework. Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology [Internet]. 2017 ;73(1):131 - 153. Available from: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00244-017-0408-7
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Marine mammals are inherently vulnerable to oil spills. We developed a conceptual framework to evaluate the impacts of potential oil exposure on marine mammals and applied it to 21 species inhabiting coastal British Columbia (BC), Canada. Oil spill vulnerability was determined by examining both the likelihood of species-specific (individual) oil exposure and the consequent likelihood of population-level effects. Oil exposure pathways, ecology, and physiological characteristics were first used to assign species—specific vulnerability rankings. Baleen whales were found to be highly vulnerable due to blowhole breathing, surface filter feeding, and invertebrate prey. Sea otters (Enhydra lutris) were ranked as highly vulnerable due to their time spent at the ocean surface, dense pelage, and benthic feeding techniques. Species-specific vulnerabilities were considered to estimate the likelihood of population-level effects occurring after oil exposure. Killer whale (Orcinus orca) populations were deemed at highest risk due to small population sizes, complex social structure, long lives, slow reproductive turnover, and dietary specialization. Finally, we related the species–specific and population-level vulnerabilities. In BC, vulnerability was deemed highest for Northern and Southern Resident killer whales and sea otters, followed by Bigg’s killer whales and Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus). Our findings challenge the typical “indicator species” approach routinely used and underscore the need to examine marine mammals at a species and population level for risk-based oil spill predictions. This conceptual framework can be combined with spill probabilities and volumes to develop more robust risk assessments and may be applied elsewhere to identify vulnerability themes for marine mammals.

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