Literature Library

Currently indexing 6891 titles

Seals and shipping: quantifying population risk and individual exposure to vessel noise

Jones EL, Hastie GD, Smout S, Onoufriou J, Merchant ND, Brookes KL, Thompson D. Seals and shipping: quantifying population risk and individual exposure to vessel noise. Journal of Applied Ecology [Internet]. 2017 . Available from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1365-2664.12911/full
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article
  1. Vessels can have acute and chronic impacts on marine species. The rate of increase in commercial shipping is accelerating, and there is a need to quantify and potentially manage the risk of these impacts.
  2. Usage maps characterising densities of grey and harbour seals and ships around the British Isles were used to produce risk maps of seal co-occurrence with shipping traffic. Acoustic exposure to individual harbour seals was modelled in a study area using contemporaneous movement data from 28 animals fitted with UHF global positioning satellite telemetry tags and automatic identification system data from all ships during 2014 and 2015. Data from four acoustic recorders were used to validate sound exposure predictions.
  3. Across the British Isles, rates of co-occurrence were highest within 50 km of the coast, close to seal haul-outs. Areas identified with high risk of exposure included 11 Special Areas of Conservation (SAC; from a possible 25). Risk to harbour seal populations was highest, affecting half of all SACs associated with the species.
  4. Predicted cumulative sound exposure level, cSELs(Mpw), over all seals was 176·8 dB re 1 μPa2 s (95% CI 163·3–190·4), ranging from 170·2 dB re 1μPa2s (95% CI 168·4–171·9) to 189·3 dB re 1 μPa2 s (95% CI 172·6–206·0) for individuals. This represented an increase in 28·3 dB re 1 μPa2 s over measured ambient noise. For 20 of 28 animals in the study, 95% CI for cSELs(Mpw) had upper bounds above levels known to induce temporary threshold shift. Predictions of broadband received sound pressure levels were underestimated on average by 0·7 dB re 1 μPa (±3·3).
  5. Synthesis and applications. We present a framework to allow shipping noise, an important marine anthropogenic stressor, to be explicitly incorporated into spatial planning. Potentially sensitive areas are identified through quantifying risk to marine species of exposure to shipping traffic, and individual noise exposure is predicted with associated uncertainty in an area with varying rates of co-occurrence. The detailed approach taken here facilitates spatial planning with regard to underwater noise within areas protected through the Habitats Directive, and could be used to provide evidence for further designations. This framework may have utility in assessing whether underwater noise levels are at Good Environmental Status under the Marine Strategy Framework Directive.

Social interactions among grazing reef fish drive material flux in a coral reef ecosystem

Gil MA, Hein AM. Social interactions among grazing reef fish drive material flux in a coral reef ecosystem. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences [Internet]. 2017 ;114(18):4703 - 4708. Available from: http://www.pnas.org/content/114/18/4703.abstract
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $10.00
Type: Journal Article

In human financial and social systems, exchanges of information among individuals cause speculative bubbles, behavioral cascades, and other correlated actions that profoundly influence system-level function. Exchanges of information are also widespread in ecological systems, but their effects on ecosystem-level processes are largely unknown. Herbivory is a critical ecological process in coral reefs, where diverse assemblages of fish maintain reef health by controlling the abundance of algae. Here, we show that social interactions have a major effect on fish grazing rates in a reef ecosystem. We combined a system for observing and manipulating large foraging areas in a coral reef with a class of dynamical decision-making models to reveal that reef fish use information about the density and actions of nearby fish to decide when to feed on algae and when to flee foraging areas. This “behavioral coupling” causes bursts of feeding activity that account for up to 68% of the fish community’s consumption of algae. Moreover, correlations in fish behavior induce a feedback, whereby each fish spends less time feeding when fewer fish are present, suggesting that reducing fish stocks may not only reduce total algal consumption but could decrease the amount of algae each remaining fish consumes. Our results demonstrate that social interactions among consumers can have a dominant effect on the flux of energy and materials through ecosystems, and our methodology paves the way for rigorous in situ measurements of the behavioral rules that underlie ecological rates in other natural systems.

A coral-algal phase shift in Mesoamerica not driven by changes in herbivorous fish abundance

Arias-González JErnesto, Fung T, Seymour RM, Garza-Pérez JRodrigo, Acosta-González G, Bozec Y-M, Johnson CR. A coral-algal phase shift in Mesoamerica not driven by changes in herbivorous fish abundance. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2017 ;12(4):e0174855. Available from: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0174855
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Coral-algal phase shifts in which coral cover declines to low levels and is replaced by algae have often been documented on coral reefs worldwide. This has motivated coral reef management responses that include restriction and regulation of fishing, e.g. herbivorous fish species. However, there is evidence that eutrophication and sedimentation can be at least as important as a reduction in herbivory in causing phase shifts. These threats arise from coastal development leading to increased nutrient and sediment loads, which stimulate algal growth and negatively impact corals respectively. Here, we first present results of a dynamic process-based model demonstrating that in addition to overharvesting of herbivorous fish, bottom-up processes have the potential to precipitate coral-algal phase shifts on Mesoamerican reefs. We then provide an empirical example that exemplifies this on coral reefs off Mahahual in Mexico, where a shift from coral to algal dominance occurred over 14 years, during which there was little change in herbivore biomass but considerable development of tourist infrastructure. Our results indicate that coastal development can compromise the resilience of coral reefs and that watershed and coastal zone management together with the maintenance of functional levels of fish herbivory are critical for the persistence of coral reefs in Mesoamerica.

Characterizing ontogenetic habitat shifts in marine fishes: advancing nascent methods for marine spatial management

Galaiduk R, Radford BT, Saunders BJ, Newman SJ, Harvey ES. Characterizing ontogenetic habitat shifts in marine fishes: advancing nascent methods for marine spatial management. Ecological Applications [Internet]. 2017 . Available from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/eap.1565/full
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $38.00
Type: Journal Article

Niche requirements and habitat resource partitioning by conspecific fishes of different sizes are significant knowledge gaps in the species distribution modelling domain. Management actions and operations are typically concentrated on static habitats, or specific areas of interest, without considering movement patterns of species associated with ontogenetic shifts in habitat usage. Generalized Additive Models were used to model the body length-habitat relationships of six fish species. These models were used to identify subsets of environmental parameters that drive and explain the continuous length-habitat relationships for each of the study species, which vary in their degree of ecological and/or commercial importance. Continuous predictive maps of the length distributions for each of the six study species across approx. 200 km2 of the study area were created from these models. The spatial patterns in habitat partitioning by individuals of different body lengths for all six study species provide strong evidence for ontogenetic shifts. This highlights the importance of considering ontogenetic processes for marine spatial management. Importantly, predictive hotspot maps were created that identify potential areas that accumulate individuals of similar life stages of multiple species (e.g. multispecies nursery areas). In circumstances where limited resources are available for monitoring and management of fish resources, predictive modelling is a valuable tool for studying previously overlooked processes such as ontogenetic habitat shifts. Predictive modelling provides crucial information that elucidates spatial patterns in community composition across mosaics of benthic habitats. This novel technique can contribute to the spatial management of coastal fish and fisheries by identifying areas that are important for different life history stages of multiple fish species.

The “Nemo Effect”: Perception and reality of Finding Nemo's impact on marine aquarium fisheries

Militz TA, Foale S. The “Nemo Effect”: Perception and reality of Finding Nemo's impact on marine aquarium fisheries. Fish and Fisheries [Internet]. 2017 ;18(3):596 - 606. Available from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/faf.12202/full
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $38.00
Type: Journal Article

Global audiences are increasingly being exposed to digital media with fictitious storylines that draw on animal characters involuntarily entering wildlife trades. An understudied problem in wildlife trade is the potential for motion pictures to influence their audience's desire to become more acquainted, often via acquisition, with animals portrayed in the films. The 2003 Disney motion picture Finding Nemoconnected audiences with a wildlife trade already commonplace: the marine aquarium trade. In this trade, fisheries supply live coral reef organisms to millions of public and private aquaria worldwide. Here, we examine the perception and reality of Finding Nemo's impact (coined the “Nemo Effect”) on the fisheries of the species complex representing the film's primary protagonist “Nemo” (Amphiprion ocellaris/percula). Import and export figures show little evidence for fan-based purchases of wild-caught fish immediately (within 1.5 years of release) following the film. We argue that the perceived impact on these species, driven by popular media with an emotive but scientifically uninformed approach to conserving coral reef ecosystems, can be more damaging to the cause of conservation than helpful. This perspective is intended to encourage marine aquarium trade stakeholders to consider the ecological and social repercussions of both media driven consumption and opposition to the trade. Using lessons learned from Finding Nemo, we discuss the likely impacts the sequel, Finding Dory, will have on wild populations of its protagonist “Dory” (Paracanthurus hepatus).

A low cost field-survey method for mapping seagrasses and their potential threats: an example from the northern Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea

Winters G, Edelist D, Shem-Tov R, Beer S, Rilov G. A low cost field-survey method for mapping seagrasses and their potential threats: an example from the northern Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea. Aquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems [Internet]. 2017 ;27(2):324 - 339. Available from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/aqc.2688/abstract
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $38.00
Type: Journal Article

1. In the Gulf of Aqaba (GoA), coral reefs are considered the dominating ecosystem, while seagrass meadows, recognized worldwide as important ecosystems, have received little attention. Absence of comprehensive seagrass maps limits awareness, evaluations of associated ecosystem services, and implementation of conservation and management tools.

2. Presented here are the first detailed maps of seagrass meadows along the Israeli coast of the northern GoA. Mapping was performed by snorkelling along transects perpendicular to the shore above meadows growing at 15–25 m. Measurements along these transects included position, meadow depth and visual estimations of seagrass cover. Shallow boundaries of meadows, parallel to shore, were recorded by GPS tracking. Supplementary work included drop-camera boat surveys to determine the position of the deeper edge of meadows. In addition, GIS layers were created that indicated shoreline infrastructures, near-shore human activities and potential pollution threats. Ecosystem services of seagrass meadows mapped were valuated using a benefit transfer approach.

3. In total, 9.7 km of the 11 km shoreline were surveyed and 2830 data points collected. Seagrasses were growing along 7.5 km of the shoreline, with shallow (15–25 m) meadows found to cover an area of 707 000 m2 and valued at more than US$ 2 000 000 yr-1 in associated ecosystem services. Pilot drop-camera surveys (additional 283 data points) indicated that meadows can extend down to 50 m in some places. Coastal uses and threats varied in character and location. A municipality runoff point and drainage canal located close to the largest meadow were identified as the main threats to local seagrasses.

4. These low-cost methods enhance our understanding of seagrass distribution in the northern GoA. They demonstrate a GIS-based tool for assessing how environmental changes might affect the cover and state of seagrasses, improving efforts to conserve seagrass, and have particular relevance to seagrass mapping in developing countries and/or island nations.

Effort rights-based management

Squires D, Maunder M, Allen R, Andersen P, Astorkiza K, Butterworth D, Caballero G, Clarke R, Ellefsen H, Guillotreau P, et al. Effort rights-based management. Fish and Fisheries [Internet]. 2017 ;18(3):440 - 465. Available from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/faf.12185/full
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $38.00
Type: Journal Article

Effort rights-based fisheries management (RBM) is less widely used than catch rights, whether for groups or individuals. Because RBM on catch or effort necessarily requires a total allowable catch (TAC) or total allowable effort (TAE), RBM is discussed in conjunction with issues in assessing fish populations and providing TACs or TAEs. Both approaches have advantages and disadvantages, and there are trade-offs between the two approaches. In a narrow economic sense, catch rights are superior because of the type of incentives created, but once the costs of research to improve stock assessments and the associated risks of determining the TAC and costs of monitoring, control, surveillance and enforcement are taken into consideration, the choice between catch or effort RBM becomes more complex and less clear. The results will be case specific. Hybrid systems based on both catch and effort are increasingly employed to manage marine fisheries to capture the advantages of both approaches. In hybrid systems, catch or effort RBM dominates and controls on the other supplements. RBM using either catch or effort by itself addresses only the target species stock externality and not the remaining externalities associated with by-catch and the ecosystem.

Strong fisheries management and governance positively impact ecosystem status

Bundy A, Chuenpagdee R, Boldt JL, Borges Mde Fatima, Camara MLamine, Coll M, Diallo I, Fox C, Fulton EA, Gazihan A, et al. Strong fisheries management and governance positively impact ecosystem status. Fish and Fisheries [Internet]. 2017 ;18(3):412 - 439. Available from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/faf.12184/full
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Fisheries have had major negative impacts on marine ecosystems, and effective fisheries management and governance are needed to achieve sustainable fisheries, biodiversity conservation goals and thus good ecosystem status. To date, the IndiSeas programme (Indicators for the Seas) has focussed on assessing the ecological impacts of fishing at the ecosystem scale using ecological indicators. Here, we explore fisheries ‘Management Effectiveness’ and ‘Governance Quality’ and relate this to ecosystem health and status. We developed a dedicated expert survey, focused at the ecosystem level, with a series of questions addressing aspects of management and governance, from an ecosystem-based perspective, using objective and evidence-based criteria. The survey was completed by ecosystem experts (managers and scientists) and results analysed using ranking and multivariate methods. Results were further examined for selected ecosystems, using expert knowledge, to explore the overall findings in greater depth. Higher scores for ‘Management Effectiveness’ and ‘Governance Quality’ were significantly and positively related to ecosystems with better ecological status. Key factors that point to success in delivering fisheries and conservation objectives were as follows: the use of reference points for management, frequent review of stock assessments, whether Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated (IUU) catches were being accounted for and addressed, and the inclusion of stakeholders. Additionally, we found that the implementation of a long-term management plan, including economic and social dimensions of fisheries in exploited ecosystems, was a key factor in successful, sustainable fisheries management. Our results support the thesis that good ecosystem-based management and governance, sustainable fisheries and healthy ecosystems go together.

Effect of coastal marine protection on childhood health: an exploratory study

Fisher B, Herrera D, Adams D, Fox HE, Gill DA, Golden CD, Mulligan M, Myers SS, Pfaff A, Selig ER, et al. Effect of coastal marine protection on childhood health: an exploratory study. The Lancet [Internet]. 2017 ;389:S8. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0140673617311200
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

Background

The integrity of ocean ecosystems are currently under threat from a suite of anthropogenic drivers including climate change, over-fishing, land-based pollution, and resource exploitation. Recent research has shown that this degradation is likely to lead to negative, long-term livelihood, biodiversity, and economic impacts. In view of the level of dependence of those in the developing countries on well-functioning ecosystems, already marginalised coastal populations are likely to suffer most of the costs of the degradation of coastal and marine ecosystems. One policy intervention that has been touted to deliver on conservation and longer-term development goals is the continued establishment of marine protected areas (MPAs). While preliminary research has shown mixed results on the effects of MPAs, some studies show, in certain contexts, positive benefits of MPAs flowing to impoverished local populations.

Methods

Here, we used a three-step process to see if we could detect an association between creation of MPAs and particular human health outcomes. We used childhood stunting as the dependent measure of human health. We built a database of 47 992 children living less than 25 km from a marine coast in 25 developing countries. We combined socioeconomic and health data from Demographic and Health Surveys with available climate and environmental data to examine this relationship. For analysis, we first used an information-theoretic approach to examine the potential association between distance to MPA and childhood stunting, while controlling for a suite of covariates and potential confounding socioeconomic variables. Second, we used a mixed-effect logit model to test proximity to MPAs and severe stunting in children. Third, we used propensity score matching to test the treatment effect of an MPA further while controlling for the same environmental and socioeconomic factors as in the logit models.

Findings

We find that the distance to MPA does show up in the top models using an information-theoretic approach. With the logit models, we find that the further from an MPA a child lives, the greater the chance a child has of being severely stunted (p<0·001). Third, we find that a significant negative effect of the treatment on severe stunting (p<0·001)—ie, proximity to an MPA reduces the incidence of severe stunting. The effect is larger for the sample living within 25 km of large MPAs.

Interpretation

While much work needs to be done to uncover a potential causal link between well-functioning marine ecosystems and childhood health, our results indicate that such an examination might prove fruitful, and ultimately that marine conservation could be a key mechanism to improve the health of the millions of marginalised coastal peoples worldwide.

Funding

The Oceans and Fisheries Initiative at the Rockefeller Foundation and the National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center.

Towards quantitative condition assessment of biodiversity outcomes: Insights from Australian marine protected areas

Addison PFE, Flander LB, Cook CN. Towards quantitative condition assessment of biodiversity outcomes: Insights from Australian marine protected areas. Journal of Environmental Management [Internet]. 2017 ;198:183 - 191. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0301479717304024
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $41.95
Type: Journal Article

Protected area management effectiveness (PAME) evaluation is increasingly undertaken to evaluate governance, assess conservation outcomes and inform evidence-based management of protected areas (PAs). Within PAME, quantitative approaches to assess biodiversity outcomes are now emerging, where biological monitoring data are directly assessed against quantitative (numerically defined) condition categories (termed quantitative condition assessments). However, more commonly qualitative condition assessments are employed in PAME, which use descriptive condition categories and are evaluated largely with expert judgement that can be subject to a range of biases, such as linguistic uncertainty and overconfidence. Despite the benefits of increased transparency and repeatability of evaluations, quantitative condition assessments are rarely used in PAME. To understand why, we interviewed practitioners from all Australian marine protected area (MPA) networks, which have access to long-term biological monitoring data and are developing or conducting PAME evaluations. Our research revealed that there is a desire within management agencies to implement quantitative condition assessment of biodiversity outcomes in Australian MPAs. However, practitioners report many challenges in transitioning from undertaking qualitative to quantitative condition assessments of biodiversity outcomes, which are hampering progress. Challenges include a lack of agency capacity (staff numbers and money), knowledge gaps, and diminishing public and political support for PAs. We point to opportunities to target strategies that will assist agencies overcome these challenges, including new decision support tools, approaches to better finance conservation efforts, and to promote more management relevant science. While a single solution is unlikely to achieve full evidence-based conservation, we suggest ways for agencies to target strategies and advance PAME evaluations toward best practice.

Habitat type and beach exposure shape fish assemblages in the surf zones of ocean beaches

Borland HP, Schlacher TA, Gilby BL, Connolly RM, Yabsley NA, Olds AD. Habitat type and beach exposure shape fish assemblages in the surf zones of ocean beaches. Marine Ecology Progress Series [Internet]. 2017 ;570:203 - 211. Available from: http://www.int-res.com/abstracts/meps/v570/p203-211/
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The surf zones of ocean beaches are prime fishing sites and provide habitat for a diversity of fish species. The spatial composition of seascapes shapes fish abundance and diversity in most coastal ecosystems, but it remains untested whether seascape effects operate on ocean beaches. This study used the surf zones of sandy beaches in eastern Australia as a model system to contrast fish assemblages between the 2 main surf habitats (nearshore troughs and offshore bars), and test how habitat partitioning changes with beach exposure, wave conditions, seascape connectivity (i.e. proximity to estuaries and rocky headlands) and tide. Fish were sampled with baited remote underwater video stations from the surf zones of 18 sandy beaches in southern Queensland and northern New South Wales. Habitat type and beach exposure combined to shape fish abundance and diversity in the surf. Fish assemblages always differed between nearshore trough and offshore bar habitats; beach exposure was also important to surf fishes but did not alter the priority effects of habitat partitioning. Beach exposure is an important predictor of faunal assemblages on ocean beaches and is often used as a surrogate in conservation planning. Our results show, however, that surf zones are not single uniform spatial units but are composed of topographically and hydrodynamically distinct habitats that support correspondingly distinct fish assemblages. Because fishing effort also differs between surf habitats, fisheries management and spatial conservation planning need to reflect these spatial nuances in the surf zones of ocean beaches.

Coastal protection and conservation on sandy beaches and dunes: context-dependent tradeoffs in ecosystem service supply

Biel RG, Hacker SD, Ruggiero P, Cohn N, Seabloom EW. Coastal protection and conservation on sandy beaches and dunes: context-dependent tradeoffs in ecosystem service supply. Ecosphere [Internet]. 2017 ;8(4):e01791. Available from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ecs2.1791/full
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Managing multiple ecosystem services (ESs) across landscapes presents a central challenge for ecosystem-based management, because services often exhibit spatiotemporal variation and weak associations with co-occurring ESs. Further focus on the mechanistic relationships among ESs and their underlying biophysical processes provides greater insight into the causes of variation and covariation among ESs, thus serving as a guide to enhance their supply while preventing adverse outcomes. Here, we used the U.S. Pacific Northwest coastal dune ecosystem to examine how invasive beachgrass management affects three ESs: coastal protection, western snowy plover conservation, and endemic foredune plant conservation. At seven coastal dune habitat restoration areas, we observed spatial variation in the supply of each ES and further identified a tradeoff between western snowy plover conservation and coastal protection. While the ESs were collectively influenced by the invasive beachgrasses and the foredunes they create, the magnitude of the synergies and tradeoffs were influenced by numerous non-shared drivers, including nearshore geomorphology, changes in foredune shape as a result of restoration, and other management actions irrespective of restoration. Incorporation of these shared and non-shared drivers into future coastal management planning may reduce tradeoffs among Pacific Northwest dune ESs. With better understanding of ES relationships, it becomes possible to identify management actions that may enhance synergies and mitigate tradeoffs, leading to better decisions for nature and people.

Cost and time-effective method for multi-scale measures of rugosity, fractal dimension, and vector dispersion from coral reef 3D models

Young GC, Dey S, Rogers AD, Exton D. Cost and time-effective method for multi-scale measures of rugosity, fractal dimension, and vector dispersion from coral reef 3D models. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2017 ;12(4):e0175341. Available from: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0175341
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

We present a method to construct and analyse 3D models of underwater scenes using a single cost-effective camera on a standard laptop with (a) free or low-cost software, (b) no computer programming ability, and (c) minimal man hours for both filming and analysis. This study focuses on four key structural complexity metrics: point-to-point distances, linear rugosity (R), fractal dimension (D), and vector dispersion (1/k). We present the first assessment of accuracy and precision of structure-from-motion (SfM) 3D models from an uncalibrated GoPro™ camera at a small scale (4 m2) and show that they can provide meaningful, ecologically relevant results. Models had root mean square errors of 1.48 cm in X-Y and 1.35 in Z, and accuracies of 86.8% (R), 99.6% (D at scales 30–60 cm), 93.6% (D at scales 1–5 cm), and 86.9 (1/k). Values of R were compared to in-situ chain-and-tape measurements, while values of D and 1/k were compared with ground truths from 3D printed objects modelled underwater. All metrics varied less than 3% between independently rendered models. We thereby improve and rigorously validate a tool for ecologists to non-invasively quantify coral reef structural complexity with a variety of multi-scale metrics.

An optical tool for quantitative assessment of phycocyanin pigment concentration in cyanobacterial blooms within inland and marine environments

Varunan T, Shanmugam P. An optical tool for quantitative assessment of phycocyanin pigment concentration in cyanobacterial blooms within inland and marine environments. Journal of Great Lakes Research [Internet]. 2017 ;43(1):32 - 49. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0380133016302076
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
Yes
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

Quantitative assessment of the pigment phycocyanin (PC) in cyanobacterial blooms is essential to assess their abundance and distribution and consequently aid their management in many recreational waters within inland and coastal environments. In contrast to the open-ocean waters, these water bodies are very complex with a pronounced heterogeneity of their optical properties, and hence accurate retrieval of the water-leaving radiances and PC concentration from satellite observations is notoriously difficult with existing algorithms. In the present study, a new inversion algorithm is developed as a rapid cyanobacteria bloom assessment method and its retrievals of PCare compared with in-situ and satellite observations and those from a previously reported inversion algorithm. The new algorithm estimates PC concentration on the basis of the unique absorption feature of phycocyanin at 620 nm which is isolated from the total pigment absorption by taking advantage of the well-recognized absorption and reflectance features in the red and near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths (less impacted by the influences of the overlapping absorption signatures of the mixture constituents and pigment packaging). The by-products of this work include chl-a concentration and predictions from reflectance data to monitor the cyanobacterial component and non-cyanobacterial component of the phytoplankton assemblage and to evaluate PC:Chl-apigment weight ratios for specific water types. Initial validation of the algorithm was performed using in-situ field data in turbid productive waters dominated by phycocyanin and other pigments, yielding coefficients of determination and slope close to unity and mean errors less than a few percent. These results suggest that the algorithm could be used as a rapid assessment tool for the remote-sensing assessment of the spatial distribution and relative abundance of cyanobacterial blooms in many regional water bodies.

Mechanisms of nickel toxicity to fish and invertebrates in marine and estuarine waters

Blewett TA, Leonard EM. Mechanisms of nickel toxicity to fish and invertebrates in marine and estuarine waters. Environmental Pollution [Internet]. 2017 ;223:311 - 322. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0269749116317766
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

In freshwater settings the toxicity of the trace metal nickel (Ni) is relatively well understood. However, until recently, there was little knowledge regarding Ni toxicity in waters of higher salinity, where factors such as water chemistry and the physiology of estuarine and marine biota would be expected to alter toxicological impact. This review summarizes recent literature investigating Ni toxicity in marine and estuarine invertebrates and fish. As in freshwater, three main mechanisms of Ni toxicity exist: ionoregulatory impairment, inhibition of respiration, and promotion of oxidative stress. However, unlike in freshwater biota, where mechanisms of toxicity are largely Class-specific, the delineation of toxic mechanisms between different species is less defined. In general, despite changes in Ni speciation in marine waters, organism physiology appears to be the main driver of toxic impact, a fact that will need to be accounted for when adapting regulatory tools (such as bioavailability normalization) from freshwater to estuarine and marine environments.

Development of a best practice framework for the management of fishing gear – Part 2: Best practice framework for the management of fishing gear

Huntington TC. Development of a best practice framework for the management of fishing gear – Part 2: Best practice framework for the management of fishing gear. Hampshire, UK: Global Ghost Gear Initiative; 2016. Available from: http://www.ghostgear.org/
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Report

In May 2016, the World Animal Protection appointed fisheries consultants Poseidon Aquatic Resource Management Ltd (Poseidon) of the UK to undertake a series of work packages. The objective was to support the GGGI’ s ‘Define best practices and inform policies’ working group in developing best practice guidance on the management of fishing gear.

Output 1

The first output was a brief scoping study to provide:

I. a working quantification of the main fishing gears used on a global basis

II. a brief summary of the main characteristics of these gears regarding user type, geographical usage and contribution to ALDFG.

This first part of the work was submitted to World Animal Protection on 16 May 2016.

Output 2

The second output was the identification of management options and mechanisms for responsible fishing gear use. It was also to include recommendations on how this could be developed into a best practice framework for managing fishing gear.

This second activity examined two main elements. First, it looked at the current management options for fishing gear. This included the use of tags and other identification of fishing gear, gear marking, gear storage to and from fishing grounds and gear retrieval in case of loss or temporary abandonment. It then examined how these are implemented – for example through legislation, codes of conduct or inclusion in third party and other certification schemes. This part of the study was the basis for the framework (see next) and has been issued as a standalone document, entitled ‘Part 1: Overview and Current Status’.

Output 3

The purpose of this third and final output of the study was to develop a ‘best practice’ framework for the management of fishing gear. Its scope is defined in Part 1 of document, is global in nature, and covers a wide range of fishing gears and users.

As a framework, it focuses on the most commonly used gear types, both in industrial and artisanal fisheries. The framework is relevant to a broad spectrum of stakeholders. These include gear manufacturers, fishers, port authorities, fisheries management authorities, seafood companies and other interested parties.

This framework will be adopted by the GGGI, developed further and targeted at specific stakeholders.

New estimate of the current rate of sea level rise from a sea level budget approach

Dieng HB, Cazenave A, Meyssignac B, Ablain M. New estimate of the current rate of sea level rise from a sea level budget approach. Geophysical Research Letters [Internet]. 2017 . Available from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/wol1/doi/10.1002/2017GL073308/abstract
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $38.00
Type: Journal Article

We revisit the global mean sea level (GMSL) budget during the whole altimetry era (January 1993 to December 2015) using a large number of data sets. The budget approach allows quantifying the TOPEX A altimeter drift (amounting 1.5 ± 0.5 mm/yr over 1993–1998). Accounting for this correction and using ensemble means for the GMSL and components lead to closure of the sea level budget (trend of the residual time series being 0.0 ± 0.22 mm/yr). The new GMSL rate over January 1993 to December 2015 is now close to 3.0 mm/yr. An important increase of the GMSL rate, of 0.8 mm/yr, is found during the second half of the altimetry era (2004–2015) compared to the 1993–2004 time span, mostly due to Greenland mass loss increase and also to slight increase of all other components of the budget.

A new, high-resolution global mass coral bleaching database

Donner SD, Rickbeil GJM, Heron SF. A new, high-resolution global mass coral bleaching database. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2017 ;12(4):e0175490. Available from: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0175490
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Episodes of mass coral bleaching have been reported in recent decades and have raised concerns about the future of coral reefs on a warming planet. Despite the efforts to enhance and coordinate coral reef monitoring within and across countries, our knowledge of the geographic extent of mass coral bleaching over the past few decades is incomplete. Existing databases, like ReefBase, are limited by the voluntary nature of contributions, geographical biases in data collection, and the variations in the spatial scale of bleaching reports. In this study, we have developed the first-ever gridded, global-scale historical coral bleaching database. First, we conducted a targeted search for bleaching reports not included in ReefBase by personally contacting scientists and divers conducting monitoring in under-reported locations and by extracting data from the literature. This search increased the number of observed bleaching reports by 79%, from 4146 to 7429. Second, we employed spatial interpolation techniques to develop annual 0.04° × 0.04° latitude-longitude global maps of the probability that bleaching occurred for 1985 through 2010. Initial results indicate that the area of coral reefs with a more likely than not (>50%) or likely (>66%) probability of bleaching was eight times higher in the second half of the assessed time period, after the 1997/1998 El Niño. The results also indicate that annual maximum Degree Heating Weeks, a measure of thermal stress, for coral reefs with a high probability of bleaching increased over time. The database will help the scientific community more accurately assess the change in the frequency of mass coral bleaching events, validate methods of predicting mass coral bleaching, and test whether coral reefs are adjusting to rising ocean temperatures.

Gendering Marine Conservation: The Politics of Marine Protected Areas and Fisheries Access

Baker-Médard M. Gendering Marine Conservation: The Politics of Marine Protected Areas and Fisheries Access. Society & Natural Resources [Internet]. 2017 ;30(6):723 - 737. Available from: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/08941920.2016.1257078?journalCode=usnr20
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $50.00
Type: Journal Article

Drawing on ethnographic case studies from Madagascar, this research shows that multiple marine conservation projects have institutionalized inequitable access to marine recourses along gendered lines. Despite discursive and institutional shifts toward more “collaborative” and “community-based” conservation programing, there is a deficiency of women’s nominal as well as effective participation in community management organizations. This research shows that conservation organizations’ focus on proximate drivers of marine resource use, or a politics of picking the “low-hanging fruit,” over ultimate drivers such as global commodity chains, places disproportionate emphasis on marine spatial enclosures and restricting specific, and gendered, harvest methods. To address gender bias concerning access to and control over natural resources, we must go beyond the rhetoric of “community involvement” to address gendered inequalities in conservation decision making, and whose interests are served by conservation projects.

Microplastics as contaminants in commercially important seafood species

Santillo D, Miller K, Johnston P. Microplastics as contaminants in commercially important seafood species. Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management [Internet]. 2017 ;13(3):516 - 521. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28440928
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $38.00
Type: Journal Article

The ingestion of microplastic fragments, spheres, and fibers by marine mollusks, crustaceans, and fish, including a number of commercially important species, appears to be a widespread and pervasive phenomenon. Evidence is also growing for direct impacts of microplastic ingestion on physiology, reproductive success and survival of exposed marine organisms, and transfer through food webs, although the ecological implications are not yet known. Concerns also remain over the capacity for microplastics to act as vectors for harmful chemical pollutants, including plastic additives and persistent organic pollutants, although their contribution must be evaluated alongside other known sources. The potential for humans, as top predators, to consume microplastics as contaminants in seafood is very real, and its implications for health need to be considered. An urgent need also exists to extend the geographical scope of studies of microplastic contamination in seafood species to currently underrepresented areas, and to finalize and adopt standardized methods and quality-assurance protocols for the isolation, identification, and quantification of microplastic contaminants from biological tissues. Such developments would enable more robust investigation of spatial and temporal trends, thereby contributing further evidence as a sound basis for regulatory controls. Despite the existence of considerable uncertainties and unknowns, there is already a compelling case for urgent actions to identify, control, and, where possible, eliminate key sources of both primary and secondary microplastics before they reach the marine environment.

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