Literature Library

Currently indexing 9210 titles

Microplastic pollution in estuaries across a gradient of human impact

Hitchcock JN, Mitrovic SM. Microplastic pollution in estuaries across a gradient of human impact. Environmental Pollution [Internet]. In Press . Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0269749118344014
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

Microplastic (MP) pollution is an emerging issue in aquatic sciences. Little comparative information currently exists about the problem in coastal systems exposed to different levels of human impact. Here we report a year-long study on the abundance of MP in the water column of three estuaries on the east-coast of Australia. The estuaries are subject to different scales of human impact; the Clyde estuary has little human modification, the Bega estuary has a small township and single wastewater treatment works discharging to its waters, and the Hunter estuary which has multiple townships, multiple wastewater treatment plants, and heavy industry. MP abundance followed an expected pattern with the lowest abundance in the low-impact Clyde estuary (98 part. m3), moderate levels of MP in the moderately impacted Bega estuary (246 part. m3), and high MP abundance in the highly impacted Hunter estuary (1,032 part. m3). The majority of particles were < 200 μm and fragment-like rather than fiber-like. MP abundance was positively related to maximum antecedent rainfall in the Bega estuary, however there are no clear environmental factors that could explain MP variation in the other systems. MP were generally higher in summer and following freshwater inflow events. On the Hunter estuary MP abundance was at times as high as zooplankton abundance, and within the range of numbers reported in other highly impacted systems globally. The results confirm that higher levels of human impact lead to greater plastic pollution and highlight the need to examine aquatic ecosystems under a range of conditions in order to adequately characterize the extent of MP pollution in rivers and coastal systems.

Improving oil spill trajectory modelling in the Arctic

Nordam T, Beegle-Krause CJ, Skancke J, Nepstad R, Reed M. Improving oil spill trajectory modelling in the Arctic. Marine Pollution Bulletin [Internet]. 2019 ;140:65 - 74. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025326X19300190
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

As petroleum development and other activities move further north, the potential for oil spills in ice-covered waters is of great concern. As a tool for contingency planning and forecasting during response, oil spill models play a key role. With the development of new, high-resolution coupled ice-ocean models, better predictions of sea ice are becoming available. We have updated the OSCAR oil spill model to use sea-ice velocity and coverage fields from coupled ice-ocean models to improve simulation of oil fate and transport in ice-covered waters.

We describe the implementation of oil transport in the presence of ice, and demonstrate the improvement by considering three case studies. We find clear improvement when taking ice velocity from a coupled ice-ocean model into account, compared to a heuristic model that uses surface current and wind velocity. The difference is found to be especially important in a response situation near the marginal ice zone.

Metabarcoding and machine learning analysis of environmental DNA in ballast water arriving to hub ports

Gerhard WA, Gunsch CK. Metabarcoding and machine learning analysis of environmental DNA in ballast water arriving to hub ports. Environment International [Internet]. 2019 ;124:312 - 319. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160412018324115
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

While ballast water has long been linked to the global transport of invasive species, little is known about its microbiome. Herein, we used 16S rRNA gene sequencing and metabarcoding to perform the most comprehensive microbiological survey of ballast water arriving to hub ports to date. In total, we characterized 41 ballast, 20 harbor, and 6 open ocean water samples from four world ports (Shanghai, China; Singapore; Durban, South Africa; Los Angeles, California). In addition, we cultured Enterococcus and E. coli to evaluate adherence to International Maritime Organization standards for ballast discharge. Five of the 41 vessels – all of which were loaded in China – did not comply with standards for at least one indicator organism. Dominant bacterial taxa of ballast water at the class level were Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Bacteroidia. Ballast water samples were composed of significantly lower proportions of Oxyphotobacteria than either ocean or harbor samples. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) effect size (LEfSe) and machine learning were used to identify and test potential biomarkers for classifying sample types (ocean, harbor, ballast). Eight candidate biomarkers were used to achieve 81% (k nearest neighbors) to 88% (random forest) classification accuracy. Further research of these biomarkers could aid the development of techniques to rapidly assess ballast water origin.

Free Ocean CO2 Enrichment (FOCE) experiments: scientific and technical recommendations for future in situ ocean acidification projects

Stark JS, Peltzer ET, Kline DI, Queirós AM, T. Cox E, Headley K, Barry J, Gazeau F, Runcie JW, Widdicombe S, et al. Free Ocean CO2 Enrichment (FOCE) experiments: scientific and technical recommendations for future in situ ocean acidification projects. Progress in Oceanography [Internet]. In Press . Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0079661117302598
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Free Ocean CO2 Enrichment (FOCE) experiments are a relatively recent development in ocean acidification research, designed to address the need for in situ, long-term, community level experiments. FOCE studies have been conducted across different marine benthic habitats and regions, from Antarctica to the tropics. Based on this previous research we have formed some core operating principles that will aid those embarking on future FOCE experiments. FOCE studies have potential to provide important insight into the effects of ocean acidification that can add to or refine conclusions drawn from laboratory or single species studies because they are conducted in situ on intact assemblages. Scaling up from sub-organismal and individual effects to also include indirect impacts on the ecosystem and ecosystem services, make FOCE experiments essential in filling in current knowledge gaps in our understanding of ocean acidification. While FOCE systems are complex, relatively costly, and somewhat difficult to operate, the challenges they pose are tractable and they have proven to be a useful approach in ocean acidification research. The aim of this paper is to draw from the experiences of past FOCE experiments and provide practical advice for designing, building and operating a FOCE experiment. Some of the most important recommendations include: field testing the system design; having a backup power supply; using replicate treatment enclosures; monitoring and maintaining the chemistry appropriately; allowing sufficient time to achieve near CO2 equilibrium conditions; and having a scientific focus with a core set of hypotheses. Future FOCE experiments could focus on longer durations, multiple factors, and testing more intact benthic marine communities and ecosystems. We hope this paper will encourage further FOCE deployments and experiments, as well as provide some guidelines to improve future FOCE studies and advance ocean acidification research.

Quantifying marine debris associated with coastal golf courses

Weber AK, Weber MW, Savoca MS. Quantifying marine debris associated with coastal golf courses. Marine Pollution Bulletin [Internet]. 2019 ;140:1 - 8. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025326X1930013X
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Identifying terrestrial sources of debris is essential to suppress the flow of plastic to the ocean. Here, we report a novel source of debris to the marine environment. From May 2016 to June 2018, we collected golf balls from coastal environments associated with five courses in Carmel, California. Our 75 collections recovered 39,602 balls from intertidal and nearshore environments adjacent to, or downriver from, the golf courses. Combining our collections with concurrent efforts of the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary and the Pebble Beach Corporation, we report the retrieval of 50,681 balls, totaling approximately 2.5 tons of debris. We also examined decomposition patterns in the collected balls, which illustrate that degradation and loss of microplastic from golf balls to the marine environment may be of concern. Our findings will help to develop and direct mitigation procedures for this region and others with coastal golf courses.

Active buoyancy adjustment increases dispersal potential in benthic marine animals

Hamel J-F, Sun J, Gianasi BL, Montgomery EM, Kenchington EL, Burel B, Rowe S, Winger PD, Mercier A. Active buoyancy adjustment increases dispersal potential in benthic marine animals. Journal of Animal Ecology [Internet]. 2019 . Available from: https://besjournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/1365-2656.12943
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $42.00
Type: Journal Article

While the study of dispersal and connectivity in the ocean typically centers on pelagic species and planktonic larval stages of benthic species, the present work explores an overlooked locomotor means in post‐settlement benthic stages that redefines their dispersal potential.

Members of the echinoderm class Holothuroidea colonize a diversity of marine environments worldwide, where they play key ecological and economical roles, making their conservation a priority. Holothuroids are commonly called sea cucumbers or sea slugs to reflect their slow movements and are assumed to disperse chiefly through pelagic larvae.

The present study documents and explores their unexpected ability to actively modify their buoyancy, leading them to tumble or float at speeds orders of magnitudes faster than through benthic crawling. Two focal species representing different taxonomic orders, geographic distributions and reproductive strategies were studied over several years.

Active buoyancy adjustment (ABA) was achieved through a rapid increase in seawater to flesh ratio by up to 740%, leading to bloating, and simultaneously detachment from the substrate. It occurred as early as 6 months post settlement in juveniles and was recorded in wild adult populations. In experimental trials, ABA was triggered by high conspecific density, decreasing salinity and increasing water turbidity. Based on field video footage, ABA‐assisted movements generated speeds of up to 90 km d−1.

These findings imply that displacement during planktonic larval stages may not supersede the locomotor capacity of benthic stages, challenging the notion of sedentarity. Combining the present results and anecdotal reports, ABA emerges as a generalized means of dispersal among benthic animals, with critical implications for worldwide management and conservation of commercially and ecologically significant species.

Living with Pigments: The Colour Palette of Antarctic Life

Marizcurrena JJosé, Cerdá MFernanda, Alem D, Castro-Sowinski S. Living with Pigments: The Colour Palette of Antarctic Life. In: Castro-Sowinski S The Ecological Role of Micro-organisms in the Antarctic Environment. The Ecological Role of Micro-organisms in the Antarctic Environment. Cham: Springer International Publishing; 2019. pp. 65 - 82. Available from: https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-030-02786-5_4
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $29.95
Type: Book Chapter

The production of pigments is a common feature that may help microorganisms to cope with the harsh conditions found in Antarctica. They have functions such as protection against UV irradiation and superoxide and nitrogen reactive species (antioxidant activity) and modulation of membrane fluidity under cold stress. In addition, they act as antibiotics, modulating the microbial communities in their natural environments, and harvest light for increasing the efficiency of photosynthesis, thus influencing the biogeochemical cycles. This chapter deals with the chemistry and the biological role of microbial pigments (except chlorophylls) in the Antarctic environment and also includes a brief overview of the potential biotechnological use of pigments.

The Ecological Role of Micro-organisms in the Antarctic Environment: Marine Fungi Associated with Antarctic Macroalgae

Ogaki MB, de Paula MT, Ruas D, Pellizzari FM, García-Laviña CX, Rosa LH. The Ecological Role of Micro-organisms in the Antarctic Environment: Marine Fungi Associated with Antarctic Macroalgae. (Castro-Sowinski S). Cham: Springer International Publishing; 2019 pp. 239 - 255. Available from: https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-030-02786-5_11
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $29.95
Type: Book

Fungi are well known for their important roles in terrestrial ecosystems, but filamentous and yeast forms are also active components of microbial communities from marine ecosystems. Marine fungi are particularly abundant and relevant in coastal systems where they can be found in association with large organic substrata, like seaweeds. Antarctica is a rather unexplored region of the planet that is being influenced by strong and rapid climate change. In the past decade, several efforts have been made to get a thorough inventory of marine fungi from different environments, with a particular emphasis on those associated with the large communities of seaweeds that abound in littoral and infralittoral ecosystems. The algicolous fungal communities obtained were characterized by a few dominant species and a large number of singletons, as well as a balance among endemic, indigenous, and cold-adapted cosmopolitan species. The long-term monitoring of this balance and the dynamics of richness, dominance, and distributional patterns of these algicolous fungal communities is proposed to understand and model the influence of climate change on the maritime Antarctic biota. In addition, several fungal isolates from marine Antarctic environments have shown great potential as producers of bioactive natural products and enzymes and may represent attractive sources of biotechnological products.

Sustainable seafood certifications are inadequate to challenges of ecosystem change

Kourantidou M, Kaiser BA. Sustainable seafood certifications are inadequate to challenges of ecosystem change. ICES Journal of Marine Science [Internet]. 2019 . Available from: https://academic.oup.com/icesjms/advance-article/doi/10.1093/icesjms/fsy198/5288560
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The recent Marine Stewardship Council certification for the Russian Barents Red King Crab demonstrates the consequences of overlooking ecological factors in seafood sustainability assessments. The crab is commercially valuable but has uncertain invasive effects for the ecosystem. Russian authorities manage it as a long-term fishery and openly accept the co-incidental risks that come along with the invasion. The Russian crab fishery is monopolized and there is limited transparency on both quota acquisition and decision-making regarding its management. Including ecological and socio-political dimensions expands the sustainability definition to more closely match general consumer perceptions of what certified sustainability represents. The focus of widely trusted certification processes on fishery practices masks important sustainability considerations from end consumers and may distort their choices.

Data mining on YouTube reveals fisher group-specific harvesting patterns and social engagement in recreational anglers and spearfishers

Sbragaglia V, Correia RA, Coco S, Arlinghaus R. Data mining on YouTube reveals fisher group-specific harvesting patterns and social engagement in recreational anglers and spearfishers. [Internet]. 2019 . Available from: https://marxiv.org/fd9yh/
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Manuscript

Data about recreational fisheries are scarce in many areas of the world. In the absence of monitoring data collected in situ, alternative data sources, such as digital applications and social media platforms, have the potential to produce valuable insights. Yet, the potential of social media for drawing insights about recreational fisheries is still underexplored. In this study, we applied data mining on YouTube videos to better understand recreational fisheries targeting common dentex (Dentex dentex), an iconic species of Mediterranean recreational fisheries. We chose this model species because of ongoing controversies about the relative impact of recreational angling and recreational spearfishing on its conservation status. In Italy alone, from 2010 to 2016 recreational spearfishers posted 1051 videos compared to 692 videos posted by recreational anglers. Only the upload pattern of spearfishing videos followed a seasonal pattern with peaks in July, suggesting seasonality of spearfishing catches of D. dentex – a trend not found for anglers. The average mass of the fish declared in recreational angling videos (6.43 kg) was significantly larger than the one in spearfishing videos (4.50 kg). Videos posted by recreational spearfishers received significantly more likes and comments than those posted by recreational anglers, suggesting that the social engagement among recreational spearfishers was stronger than in anglers. We also found that the mass of the fish positively predicted social engagement in recreational spearfishing videos, but not in videos posted by recreational anglers. This could be caused by the generally smaller odds of catching large D. dentex by spearfishing, possibly explaining why posting videos with particularly large specimen triggered larger social engagement by recreational spearfishers. Our case study demonstrates that data mining on YouTube can be a powerful tool to provide complementary data on controversial and data-poor aspects of recreational fisheries.

Current fossil fuel infrastructure does not yet commit us to 1.5 °C warming

Smith CJ, Forster PM, Allen M, Fuglestvedt J, Millar RJ, Rogelj J, Zickfeld K. Current fossil fuel infrastructure does not yet commit us to 1.5 °C warming. Nature Communications [Internet]. 2019 ;10(1). Available from: http://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-018-07999-w
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Committed warming describes how much future warming can be expected from historical emissions due to inertia in the climate system. It is usually defined in terms of the level of warming above the present for an abrupt halt of emissions. Owing to socioeconomic constraints, this situation is unlikely, so we focus on the committed warming from present-day fossil fuel assets. Here we show that if carbon-intensive infrastructure is phased out at the end of its design lifetime from the end of 2018, there is a 64% chance that peak global mean temperature rise remains below 1.5 °C. Delaying mitigation until 2030 considerably reduces the likelihood that 1.5 °C would be attainable even if the rate of fossil fuel retirement was accelerated. Although the challenges laid out by the Paris Agreement are daunting, we indicate 1.5 °C remains possible and is attainable with ambitious and immediate emission reduction across all sectors.

Granger-causality analysis of integrated-model outputs, a tool to assess external drivers in fishery

Rincón M, Corti R, Elvarsson B, Ramos F, Ruiz J. Granger-causality analysis of integrated-model outputs, a tool to assess external drivers in fishery. [Internet]. 2019 . Available from: https://marxiv.org/zn63y/
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Manuscript

Integrated models are able to combine several sources of data into a single analysis using joint likelihood functions, fostering the consistency of assumptions among analyses and the ability to diagnose goodness of fit and model-misspecification. Owing to their capacity to consistently combine diverse information, integrated models could detect the variability induced by external drivers, such as various environmental drivers, on key components of the stock dynamics (e.g. recruitment) in cases where these external drivers are relevant but not yet identified or incorporated into the modelling exercise. This diagnosing power could then be used to explore causality between fishery dynamics, as estimated by the integrated model, and external drivers. To achieve this aim, a correlation analysis is neither necessary nor sufficient to prove causation. An alternative statistical concept, Granger-causality, provides a framework that uses predictability, rather than correlation, to give more evidence of causation between time-series variables.

A two-step procedure to investigate external forcings in stock dynamics is proposed. First, an integrated model is implemented to detect anomalies that cannot be explained by the internal dynamics of the stock. Then, in a second step, Granger-causality is used to detect the external origin of these anomalies. This two-step procedure is explored using the European anchovy in the Gulf of Cádiz as an example population where the external (environmental) drivers are well documented. The fishery dynamics is first estimated through an age-length model (Gadget). Then Granger-causality is used to assess the predictive power of different environmental drivers on recruitment. The results indicate that this is a powerful procedure, although also with important limitations, to determine predictability and that it can be implemented in a wide variety of stocks and external drivers. Moreover, once Granger-causality has been identified, it is shown that it can be used to forecast by making few modifications of the integrated model used for diagnosis.

Feeding ecology of invasive lionfish (Pterois volitans and Pterois miles) in the temperate and tropical western Atlantic

Peake J, Bogdanoff AK, Layman CA, Castillo B, Reale-Munroe K, Chapman J, Dahl K, III WFPatters, Eddy C, Ellis RD, et al. Feeding ecology of invasive lionfish (Pterois volitans and Pterois miles) in the temperate and tropical western Atlantic. Biological Invasions [Internet]. 2018 ;20(9):2567 - 2597. Available from: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10530-018-1720-5
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Numerous location-based diet studies have been published describing different aspects of invasive lionfish (Pterois volitans and Pterois miles) feeding ecology, but there has been no synthesis of their diet composition and feeding patterns across regional gradients. 8125 lionfish stomachs collected from 10 locations were analyzed to provide a generalized description of their feeding ecology at a regional scale and to compare their diet among locations. Our regional data indicate lionfish in the western Atlantic are opportunistic generalist carnivores that consume at least 167 vertebrate and invertebrate prey species across multiple trophic guilds, and carnivorous fish and shrimp prey that are not managed fishery species and not considered at risk of extinction by the International Union for Conservation of Nature disproportionately dominate their diet. Correlations between lionfish size and their diet composition indicate lionfish in the western Atlantic transition from a shrimp-dominated diet to a fish-dominated diet through ontogeny. Lionfish total length (TL) (mm) was found to predict mean prey mass per stomach (g) by the following equation mean prey mass =0.0002*TL1.6391, which can be used to estimate prey biomass consumption from lionfish length-frequency data. Our locational comparisons indicate lionfish diet varies considerably among locations, even at the group (e.g., crab) and trophic guild levels. The Modified Index of Relative Importance developed specifically for this study, calculated as the frequency of prey a × the number of prey a, can be used in other diet studies to assess prey importance when prey mass data are not available. Researchers and managers can use the diet data presented in this study to make inference about lionfish feeding ecology in areas where their diet has yet to be described. These data can be used to guide research and monitoring efforts, and can be used in modeling exercises to simulate the potential effects of lionfish on marine food webs. Given the large variability in lionfish diet composition among locations, this study highlights the importance of continued location-based diet assessments to better inform local management activities.

Improving a decree law about coastal zone management in a small island developing state: The case of Cuba

Batista CMilanés, Pereira CI, Botero CM. Improving a decree law about coastal zone management in a small island developing state: The case of Cuba. Marine Policy [Internet]. In Press . Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X18301830
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

Cuba is one of the few countries from the Small Island Developing States in the Caribbean region having solid coastal legislation: Decree Law 212 (DL-212) entitled “Coastal Zone Management”. However, that legal framework presents some deficiencies that need to be improved, wherefore an analysis of the major features of DL-212 and the identification of its main issues were conducted in the present study; some ways of implementing the DL-212 in the country were assessed as well. Regarding the Land-Sea Interaction, this work proposes a set of four variables linking geomorphological and human criteria with the aim of improving coastal zone characterization and boundary delimitation. The set of four variables falls into six types of Coastal Geomorphic-typological Units, which are also sub-classified according to the physical aspects and level of territorial urbanization of the Units. Standard nomenclature about boundaries, territorial planning in relation to land-sea interaction is provided in the present research, as well as nine guidelines and eleven recommendations for institutions responsible for physical use planning to implement, in order to obtain a better understanding and implementation of DL-212. The study makes a great contribution to decision-making processes regarding Land-Use Planning, Integrated Coastal Zone Management, and Marine Spatial Planning for future implementation in other Small Island Developing States.

Teasing apart the different size pools of extracellular enzymatic activity in the ocean

Baltar F, De Corte D, Thomson B, Yokokawa T. Teasing apart the different size pools of extracellular enzymatic activity in the ocean. Science of The Total Environment [Internet]. 2019 ;660:690 - 696. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0048969719300907
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $41.95
Type: Journal Article

Extracellular enzymatic activity (EEA) is performed by cell-associated and cell-free (i.e., “dissolved”) enzymes. This cell-free fraction is operationally defined as passing through a 0.22 μm filter. The contribution of cell-free to total EEA is comparable to the cell-associated counterpart, so it is critical to understand what controls the relative importance of cell-free versus cell-associated EEA. However, attempts to tease apart the contribution of EEAs in the so-called dissolved fraction (<0.22 μm) in general, and of the nanoparticle size fraction (0.020–0.20 μm) in particular, to the total EEA pool are lacking. Here we performed experiments with Northern and Southern Hemisphere coastal waters to characterize the potential contribution of that nanoparticle fraction to the total EEA fraction of alkaline phosphatase, beta-glucosidase and leucine aminopeptidase. We found a significant contribution (in both hemispheres) of the nanoparticle fraction to the total EEA pool (up to 53%) that differed depending on the enzyme type and location. Collectively, our results indicate that a significant fraction of the so-called “dissolved EEA” is not really dissolved but associated to nanoparticles, colloidal nanogels and/or viruses. Thus, the total marine EEA pool can actually be divided into a cell-associated, undissolved-cell-free (associated to nano-particle of different origins such as viruses and nanogels) and a dissolved-cell-free pools. Our results also imply that the dissolved EEA pool is more complex than thus far anticipated. Future research will be now needed to further characterize the factors controlling the relative importance of these different pools of EEA, which are key in the recycling of organic matter in the ocean.

Social responses of travelling finless porpoises to boat traffic risk in Misumi West Port, Ariake Sound, Japan

Morimura N, Mori Y. Social responses of travelling finless porpoises to boat traffic risk in Misumi West Port, Ariake Sound, Japan Munderloh UGertrud. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2019 ;14(1):e0208754. Available from: https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0208754
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Anthropogenic effects have created various risks for wild animals. Boat traffic is one of the most fatal risks for marine mammals. Individual behavioral responses of cetaceans, including diving behavior such as changing swimming direction and lengthing inter-breath interval, to passing boats is relatively well known; however, the social function of cetacean responses to boat traffic in a natural setting remains poorly understood. We focused on describing the behavioral responses of single and aggregated finless porpoises to boats passing at Misumi West Port, Ariake Sound, Japan, by using a drone characterized with a high-precision bird’s-eye angle. During the study period, we collected 25 episodes of finless porpoise responses to boats passing by. A mean (± SEM) of 5.1 ± 1.0 individuals were observed for each episode. The primary response to passing boats was avoidance by dive, which implies boat traffic is a substantial disturbance to finless porpoises that travel along the seawater surface daily. The diving duration decreased significantly with an increase in the number of aggregated individuals. The diving and floating reaction times were 10.9 ± 2.3 s and 18.7 ± 5.0 s, respectively. There was no significant difference between the reaction times indicating that each individual was motivated to keep the group cohesion consistent when floating even after the risk had dissolved, which is comparable to the behavior of porpoises that dive when riskier conditions are present, such as when a boat approaches an aggregation. Our findings provide new insights on the sociality of finless porpoises even though there were limitations, like an inability to identify a specific individual. The drone enabled us to observe the social behavior of finless porpoises and other cetaceans at an unprecedented resolution, which may lead to a better understanding of the evolutionary diversity of intelligence and sociality and the bridge to human evolution.

Current Status of European Oyster Decline and Restoration in Germany

Pogoda B. Current Status of European Oyster Decline and Restoration in Germany. Humanities [Internet]. 2019 ;8(1):9. Available from: https://www.mdpi.com/2076-0787/8/1/9
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Marine ecosystems of temperate regions are highly modified by human activity and far from their original natural status. The North Sea, known as an intensively used area, has lost its offshore oyster grounds due to overexploitation in a relatively short time. Native oyster beds as a once abundant and ecologically highly important biogenic reef-type have vanished from the North Sea ecosystem in most areas of both their former distribution and magnitude. Worldwide, oyster stocks have been severely exploited over the past centuries. According to estimates, about 85% of the worldwide oyster reef habitats have been destroyed over the course of the last century. This loss of oyster populations has meant far more than just the loss of a valuable food resource. Oyster reefs represent a characteristic benthic community which offers a variety of valuable ecosystem services: better water quality, local decrease of toxic algal blooms, increase in nutrient uptake, increase of bentho-pelagic coupling, increase in species richness, increase of multidimensional biogenic structures which provide habitat, food, and protection for numerous invertebrate and fish species. The aim of oyster restoration is to promote redevelopment of this valuable missing habitat. The development of strategies, methods, and procedures for a sustainable restoration of the European oyster Ostrea edulis in the German North Sea is currently a focus of marine nature conservation. Main drivers for restoring this ecological key species are the enhancement of biodiversity and ecosystem services in the marine environment. Results of these investigations will support the future development and implementation of a large-scale and long-term German native oyster restoration programme to re-establish a healthy population of this once-abundant species now absent from the region.

A picture of change: using photovoice to explore social and environmental change in coastal communities on the Andaman Coast of Thailand

Bennett NJames, Dearden P. A picture of change: using photovoice to explore social and environmental change in coastal communities on the Andaman Coast of Thailand. Local Environment [Internet]. 2013 ;18(9):983 - 1001. Available from: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13549839.2012.748733
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $42.50
Type: Journal Article

Coastal communities experience a wide array of environmental and social changes to which they must constantly adapt. Further, a community's perception of change and risk has significant implications for a community's willingness and ability to adapt to both current and future changes. As part of a larger study focusing on the adaptive capacity of communities on the Andaman Coast of Thailand, we used Photovoice to open a dialogue with communities about changes in the marine environment and in coastal communities. This article presents the results of two exploratory Photovoice processes and discusses prospects for using the Photovoice method for exploring social and environmental change. Changes examined included a number of broader environmental and social trends as well as ecological specifics and social particularities in each site. Participants also explored the social implications of environmental changes, the impacts of macro-scale processes on local outcomes, and emotive and active responses of individuals and communities to change. Photovoice is deemed a powerful method for: examining social, environmental, and socio-ecological change, triangulating to confirm the results of other scientific methods, revealing novel ecological interactions, and providing input into community processes focusing on natural resource management, community development, and climate change adaptation.

Vulnerability to multiple stressors in coastal communities: a study of the Andaman coast of Thailand

Bennett NJames, Dearden P, Peredo AMaría. Vulnerability to multiple stressors in coastal communities: a study of the Andaman coast of Thailand. Climate and Development [Internet]. 2015 ;7(2):124 - 141. Available from: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/17565529.2014.886993
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $50.00
Type: Journal Article

Vulnerability and adaptation to climate change have become a dominant theme in development and conservation research and work. Yet coastal communities are facing a wider array of different stressors that affect the sustainability of natural resources and the adaptive capacity of local residents. The ability of communities and households to adapt is influenced by the nature, number, and magnitude of the changes with which they have to contend. In this paper, we present the range of 36 socio-economic (i.e. economic, social, governance and conflict) and biophysical (i.e. climate change and other environmental) stressors that emerged from qualitative interviews in seven coastal communities on the Andaman coast of Thailand. These stressors were then integrated into a quantitative survey of 237 households wherein participants were asked to rate the level of impact of these stressors on household livelihoods. Ratings showed that economic and some climate change stressors – extreme weather events and changes in rainfall patterns and seasons – were scored higher than other stressors. The paper also examines the relationships between community and various individual and household characteristics – such as gender, age, livelihoods, levels of social capital, and socio-economic status – and the perceived level of impacts of various stressors on household livelihoods. Overall, community and livelihoods had the most differentiated impacts on perceptions of stressors but few other prominent patterns emerged. In conclusion, this paper discusses the implications of the results for current climate change vulnerability and adaptation policy and practice in Thailand and elsewhere.

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