Literature Library

Currently indexing 8598 titles

Ecosystem-based management in Canada and Norway: The importance of political leadership and effective decision-making for implementation

Sander G. Ecosystem-based management in Canada and Norway: The importance of political leadership and effective decision-making for implementation. Ocean & Coastal Management [Internet]. 2018 ;163:485 - 497. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0964569118302552
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

A comparison of a Norwegian and two Canadian management plans reveals that most of the measures in the Norwegian plan were put into practice, whereas the Canadian plans did not result in the implementation of any new measures. This paper applies implementation theory to explain the different results. First, there is a striking difference in the leadership of the two governments and the way they organized for the planning. The Norwegian government led the process in a top-down manner and tried to apply a “whole-of-government” approach. The Canadian government delegated the entire task to the regional branches of one ministry alone. The different roles taken may be explained by different political and economic contexts that create different motivations for the governments to engage. Second, there were different ways of deciding when conflicts arose. The Norwegian coalition government negotiated internal compromises in the form of package deals. In Canada, the collaborative planning based on consensus concealed disagreements in high-level statements and pushed concrete solutions forward to later action planning that never occurred. These processes reflect different national policy styles and resulted in policy designs that created a very different impetus for implementation. The analysis demonstrate how theory-driven case-study methodology can lead to cumulative results.

Strong effects of coral species on the diversity and structure of reef fish communities: A multi-scale analysis

Komyakova V, Jones GP, Munday PL. Strong effects of coral species on the diversity and structure of reef fish communities: A multi-scale analysis. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2018 ;13(8):e0202206. Available from: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0202206
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

While there is increasing evidence for habitat specialization in coral reef fishes, the extent to which different corals support different fish communities is not well understood. Here we quantitatively assess the relative importance of different coral species in structuring fish communities and evaluate whether sampling scale and coral colony size affect the perceived strength of fish-habitat relationships. Fish communities present on colonies of eight coral species (Porites cylindrica, Echinopora horrida, Hydnophora rigida, Stylophora pistillata, Seriatopora hystrix, Acropora formosa, A. tenuis and A. millepora) were examined in the Lizard Island lagoon, Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Additionally, the differences in fish communities supported by three coral species (P. cylindrica, E. horrida, H. rigida) were investigated at three spatial scales of sampling (2x2 m, 1x1 m, 0.5x0.5 m). Substantial differences in fish communities were observed across the different coral species, with E. horrida and H. rigidasupporting the most fish species and individuals. Coral species explained more of the variability in fish species richness (20.9–53.6%), than in fish abundance (0–15%). Most coral species supported distinctive fish communities, with dissimilarities ranging from 50 to 90%. For three focal coral species, a greater amount of total variation in fish species richness and fish abundance was evident at a larger scale of sampling. Together, these results indicate that the structure of reef fish communities is finely tuned to coral species. Loss of preferred coral species could have profound effects on reef fish biodiversity, potentially more so than would be predicted on the basis of declining coral cover alone.

Detecting suspicious activities at sea based on anomalies in Automatic Identification Systems transmissions

Ford JH, Peel D, Kroodsma D, Hardesty BDenise, Rosebrock U, Wilcox C. Detecting suspicious activities at sea based on anomalies in Automatic Identification Systems transmissions. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2018 ;13(8):e0201640. Available from: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0201640
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a standard feature of ocean-going vessels, designed to allow vessels to notify each other of their position and route, to reduce collisions. Increasingly, the system is being used to monitor vessels remotely, particularly with the advent of satellite receivers. One fundamental problem with AIS transmission is the issue of gaps in transmissions. Gaps occur for three basic reasons: 1) saturation of the system in locations with high vessel density; 2) poor quality transmissions due to equipment on the vessel or receiver; and 3) intentional disabling of AIS transmitters. Resolving which of these mechanisms is responsible for generating gaps in transmissions from a given vessel is a critical task in using AIS to remotely monitor vessels. Moreover, separating saturation and equipment issues from intentional disabling is a key issue, as intentional disabling is a useful risk factor in predicting illicit behaviors such as illegal fishing. We describe a spatial statistical model developed to identify gaps in AIS transmission, which allows calculation of the probability that a given gap is due to intentional disabling. The model we developed successfully identifies high risk gaps in the test case example in the Arafura Sea. Simulations support that the model is sensitive to frequent gaps as short as one hour. Results in this case study area indicate expected high risk vessels were ranked highly for risk of intentional disabling of AIS transmitters. We discuss our findings in the context of improving enforcement opportunities to reduce illicit activities at sea.

Evaluating Rockfish Conservation Areas in southern British Columbia, Canada using a Random Forest model of rocky reef habitat

Haggarty D, Yamanaka L. Evaluating Rockfish Conservation Areas in southern British Columbia, Canada using a Random Forest model of rocky reef habitat. Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science [Internet]. 2018 ;208:191 - 204. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0272771418302841
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

We developed a rockfish habitat model to evaluate a network of Rockfish Conservation Areas (RCAs) implemented by Fisheries and Oceans Canada to reverse population declines of inshore Pacific rockfishes (Sebastes spp.). We modeled rocky reef habitat in all nearshore waters of southern British Columbia (BC) using a supervised classification of variables derived from a bathymetry model with 20 m2 resolution. We compared the results from models at intermediate (20 m2) and fine (5 m2) resolutions in five test areas where acoustic multibeam echosounder and backscatter data were available. The inclusion of backscatter variables did not substantially improve model accuracy. The intermediate-resolution model performed well with an accuracy of 75%, except in very steep habitats such as coastal inlets; it was used to estimate the total habitat area and the percent of rocky habitat in 144 RCAs in southern BC. We also compared the amount of habitat estimated by our 20 m2 model to the 100 m2 management model used to designate the RCAs and found that a slightly lower proportion of habitat (18% vs 20%) but a considerably smaller area (400 km2 vs 1370 km2) is protected in the RCAs, likely as a result of the poor resolution of the original model. Empirically derived maps of important habitats, such as rocky reefs, are necessary to support effective marine spatial planning and to design and evaluate the efficacy of management and conservation actions.

Shipboard design and fabrication of custom 3D-printed soft robotic manipulators for the investigation of delicate deep-sea organisms

Vogt DM, Becker KP, Phillips BT, Graule MA, Rotjan RD, Shank TM, Cordes EE, Wood RJ, Gruber DF. Shipboard design and fabrication of custom 3D-printed soft robotic manipulators for the investigation of delicate deep-sea organisms Pisignano D. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2018 ;13(8):e0200386. Available from: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0200386
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Soft robotics is an emerging technology that has shown considerable promise in deep-sea marine biological applications. It is particularly useful in facilitating delicate interactions with fragile marine organisms. This study describes the shipboard design, 3D printing and integration of custom soft robotic manipulators for investigating and interacting with deep-sea organisms. Soft robotics manipulators were tested down to 2224m via a Remotely-Operated Vehicle (ROV) in the Phoenix Islands Protected Area (PIPA) and facilitated the study of a diverse suite of soft-bodied and fragile marine life. Instantaneous feedback from the ROV pilots and biologists allowed for rapid re-design, such as adding “fingernails”, and re-fabrication of soft manipulators at sea. These were then used to successfully grasp fragile deep-sea animals, such as goniasterids and holothurians, which have historically been difficult to collect undamaged via rigid mechanical arms and suction samplers. As scientific expeditions to remote parts of the world are costly and lengthy to plan, on-the-fly soft robot actuator printing offers a real-time solution to better understand and interact with delicate deep-sea environments, soft-bodied, brittle, and otherwise fragile organisms. This also offers a less invasive means of interacting with slow-growing deep marine organisms, some of which can be up to 18,000 years old.

Beached bachelors: An extensive study on the largest recorded sperm whale Physeter macrocephalus mortality event in the North Sea

IJsseldijk LL, van Neer A, Deaville R, Begeman L, van de Bildt M, van den Brand JMA, Brownlow A, Czeck R, Dabin W, Doeschate Mten, et al. Beached bachelors: An extensive study on the largest recorded sperm whale Physeter macrocephalus mortality event in the North Sea Hyrenbach D. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2018 ;13(8):e0201221. Available from: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0201221
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Between the 8th January and the 25th February 2016, the largest sperm whale Physeter macrocephalus mortality event ever recorded in the North Sea occurred with 30 sperm whales stranding in five countries within six weeks. All sperm whales were immature males. Groups were stratified by size, with the smaller animals stranding in the Netherlands, and the largest in England. The majority (n = 27) of the stranded animals were necropsied and/or sampled, allowing for an international and comprehensive investigation into this mortality event. The animals were in fair to good nutritional condition and, aside from the pathologies caused by stranding, did not exhibit significant evidence of disease or trauma. Infectious agents were found, including various parasite species, several bacterial and fungal pathogens and a novel alphaherpesvirus. In nine of the sperm whales a variety of marine litter was found. However, none of these findings were considered to have been the primary cause of the stranding event. Potential anthropogenic and environmental factors that may have caused the sperm whales to enter the North Sea were assessed. Once sperm whales enter the North Sea and head south, the water becomes progressively shallower (<40 m), making this region a global hotspot for sperm whale strandings. We conclude that the reasons for sperm whales to enter the southern North Sea are the result of complex interactions of extrinsic environmental factors. As such, these large mortality events seldom have a single ultimate cause and it is only through multidisciplinary, collaborative approaches that potentially multifactorial large-scale stranding events can be effectively investigated.

Evaluation of a national operational salmon lice monitoring system—From physics to fish

Myksvoll MSkuggedal, Sandvik ADagrun, Albretsen J, Asplin L, Johnsen IAskeland, Karlsen Ø, Kristensen NMelsom, Melsom A, Skardhamar J, Ådlandsvik B. Evaluation of a national operational salmon lice monitoring system—From physics to fish Martínez-Llorens S. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2018 ;13(7):e0201338. Available from: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0201338
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The Norwegian government has decided that the aquaculture industry shall grow, provided that the growth is environmentally sustainable. Sustainability is scored based on the mortality of wild salmonids caused by the parasitic salmon lice. Salmon lice infestation pressure has traditionally been monitored through catching wild sea trout and Arctic char using nets or traps or by trawling after Atlantic salmon postsmolts. However, due to that the Norwegian mainland coastline is nearly 25 000 km, complementary methods that may be used in order to give complete results are needed. We have therefore developed an operational salmon lice model, which calculates the infestation pressure all along the coast in near real-time based on a hydrodynamical ocean model and a salmon lice particle tracking model. The hydrodynamic model generally shows a negative temperature bias and a positive salinity bias compared to observations. The modeled salmon lice dispersion correlates with measured lice on wild salmonids caught using traps or nets. This allows for using two complementary data sources in order to determine the infestation pressure of lice originating from fish farms on wild salmonids, and thereby provide an improved monitoring system for assessing risk and sustainability which forms the basis for knowledge-based advice to management authorities.

Recreational fisheries economics between illusion and reality: The case of Algeria

Babali N, Kacher M, Belhabib D, Louanchi F, Pauly D. Recreational fisheries economics between illusion and reality: The case of Algeria Tsikliras AC. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2018 ;13(8):e0201602. Available from: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0201602
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Recreational fishing is often perceived as harmless when it comes to fisheries management, and its impact often estimated to surpass the economic outcomes of e.g. large-scale fisheries. Recreational fisheries are often an indication of political stability and sound ecosystem management. However, despite a high economic impact, the economic costs on traditional and small-scale commercial fishers is yet to be known. This paper answers the question of how unregulated recreational fisheries could rather generate a loss to an economy, and cause unfair competition with existing commercial sectors using the example of Algeria. This paper assesses catches and economic value of recreational fisheries in Algeria, and finds that over 6,000 tonnes reach commercial markets annually, competing directly with the small-scale artisanal sector, while selling recreationally caught fish is still illegal. The paper further finds that the public is thereby deprived—through lost tax, licence income and landed value of $45 million US annually.

Variation in species diversity of deep-water megafauna assemblages in the Caribbean across depth and ecoregions

Hernández-Ávila I, Guerra-Castro E, Bracho C, Rada M, Ocaña FA, Pech D. Variation in species diversity of deep-water megafauna assemblages in the Caribbean across depth and ecoregions Kiel S. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2018 ;13(8):e0201269. Available from: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0201269
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Diversity patterns of the deep-sea megafauna in the Caribbean Basin and the Guiana ecoregion were analyzed in order to test the hypothesis of species richness variation as a function of depth and the hypothesis of non-differences between ecoregions by analyzing spatial patterns of five taxa and a merged assemblage. Collections of five taxa (corals, sea stars, sea urchins, sea lilies and gastropods) were obtained from seven oceanographic expeditions aboard the R/V Pillsbury at 310 stations between 60 and 7500 m depth. Data were sorted according to depth zones and ecoregions and were analyzed in order to estimate species richness, changes in species composition and distinction of β-diversity by species turnover or by nestedness. The observed patterns of diversity were consistent between taxa and their assemblage: Species richness increased from the continental shelf (60–200 m deep) to the slope (200–2000 m deep), followed by a decrease at the continental rise-abyssal zone. We detected marked changes in species composition according to depth ranges. Changes in species composition in relation to ecoregions were also detected. In general, the Caribbean Basin lacks important physical barriers, causing high deep-sea ecosystem connectivity; however, variation in composition could be related to changes in environmental conditions associated with productivity and/or continental influences.

Examination of tourists’ willingness to pay under different conservation scenarios; Evidence from reef manta ray snorkeling in Fiji

Murphy SE, Campbell I, Drew JA. Examination of tourists’ willingness to pay under different conservation scenarios; Evidence from reef manta ray snorkeling in Fiji Patterson HM. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2018 ;13(8):e0198279. Available from: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0198279
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Wildlife-focused tourism is often considered as having the potential to play an integral part of threatened species conservation efforts, particularly through financial support. We focused on the direct financing of conservation by investigating tourists’ willingness to pay to snorkel with reef manta rays (Mobula alfredi) at Barefoot Manta, an ecotourism resort in the Yasawa group of islands in Fiji. Our results indicate that 82.4% of people surveyed would be willing to pay a mean value of ~ USD $9.2 (SE 0.9) more than the current cost, a 28% increase. Also, 89% of people surveyed would be willing to pay a mean value of ~ USD $10.2 (SE 0.9) more for a hypothetical scenario where they would snorkel with 50% fewer people, a 31% increase. We also investigated tourists’ willingness to make voluntary donations to the local community above an existing payment of ~ USD $10 that is built into the current snorkel payment of ~ USD $32.5. On average, 91.3% of the tourists interviewed were willing to donate additional funds with an average additional donation of ~ USD $8.6 (SE 0.5) to the community to pay for educational and environmental support, an 86% increase. There were few significant relationships between willingness to pay and demographic factors (including age, income, nationality, education, and others), suggesting that willingness to pay was widely held by the tourist population staying at Barefoot Manta Resort. Together, these results indicate that wildlife-based nature tourism could represent a potential, but not unlimited, income source to fund conservation in the Yasawa group, Fiji islands, and that conservation can arise from partnerships between local communities and the tourism sector

Is catch-and-release shore angling compatible with the conservation goals of marine protected areas? A case study from the iSimangaliso Wetland Park in South Africa

Mann BQ, Cowley PD, Dunlop SW, Potts WM. Is catch-and-release shore angling compatible with the conservation goals of marine protected areas? A case study from the iSimangaliso Wetland Park in South Africa. Fisheries Research [Internet]. 2018 ;208:179 - 188. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165783618302200
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

Area management in the form of no-take marine protected areas (MPAs) has been criticised as a fisheries management tool because of its limited capacity to provide short-term benefits to local fisheries. This study used data from a long-term fish monitoring and tagging project to assess whether catch-and-release (C&R) shore angling could be compatible with the management objectives of a large, multiple-use, zoned MPA in South Africa. Tag-recapture rates, trends in relative abundance and mean size of target species, sub-lethal effects and other potential environmental impacts suggested that C&R research angling, using best practise fish handling techniques, did not have an overall negative impact on protected fish populations. While positive from a scientific monitoring perspective, more sensitive species did show evidence of increased post-release mortality that would be exacerbated by higher intensity C&R angling conducted by members of the angling public. It is thus concluded that C&R shore angling by members of the angling public is not compatible with MPAs zoned for no-take. However, because C&R angling does have substantially lower negative impacts compared to recreational harvest fisheries, areas zoned for C&R offer good potential as buffer areas adjacent to no-take areas or as stand-alone areas where fish conservation can be improved. This concept is proposed for the improved conservation of surf-zone angling fish species within the iSimangaliso Wetland Park and further afield.

Progress in integrating natural and social science in marine ecosystem-based management research

Alexander KA, Hobday AJ, Cvitanovic C, Ogier E, Nash KL, Cottrell RS, Fleming A, Fudge M, Fulton EA, Frusher S, et al. Progress in integrating natural and social science in marine ecosystem-based management research. Marine and Freshwater Research [Internet]. 2018 . Available from: http://www.publish.csiro.au/?paper=MF17248
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $25.00
Type: Journal Article

Climate change, in combination with population growth, is placing increasing pressure on the world’s oceans and their resources. This is threatening sustainability and societal wellbeing. Responding to these complex and synergistic challenges requires holistic management arrangements. To this end, ecosystem-based management (EBM) promises much by recognising the need to manage the ecosystem in its entirety, including the human dimensions. However, operationalisation of EBM in the marine environment has been slow. One reason may be a lack of the inter-disciplinary science required to address complex social–ecological marine systems. In the present paper, we synthesise the collective experience of the authors to explore progress in integrating natural and social sciences in marine EBM research, illustrating actual and potential contributions. We identify informal barriers to and incentives for this type of research. We find that the integration of natural and social science has progressed at most stages of the marine EBM cycle; however, practitioners do not yet have the capacity to address all of the problems that have led to the call for inter-disciplinary research. In addition, we assess how we can support the next generation of researchers to undertake the effective inter-disciplinary research required to assist with operationalising marine EBM, particularly in a changing climate.

A dynamic management framework for socio-ecological system stewardship: A case study for the United States Bureau of Ocean Energy Management

Auad G, Blythe J, Coffman K, Fath BD. A dynamic management framework for socio-ecological system stewardship: A case study for the United States Bureau of Ocean Energy Management. Journal of Environmental Management [Internet]. 2018 ;225:32 - 45. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0301479718308429
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $41.95
Type: Journal Article

An effective and efficient stewardship of natural resources requires consistency across all decision-informing approaches and components involved, i.e., managerial, governmental, political, and legal. To achieve this consistency, these elements must be aligned under an overarching management goal that is consistent with current and well-accepted knowledge. In this article, we investigate the adoption by the US Bureau of Ocean Energy Management of an environmental resilience-centered system that manages for resilience of marine ecological resources and its associated social elements. Although the framework is generally tailored for this Bureau, it could also be adapted to other federal or non-federal organizations. This paper presents a dynamic framework that regards change as an inherent element of the socio-ecological system in which management structures, e.g., federal agencies, are embedded. The overall functioning of the management framework being considered seeks to mimic and anticipate environmental change in line with well-accepted elements of resilience-thinking. We also investigate the goal of using management for resilience as a platform to enhance socio-ecological sustainability by setting specific performance metrics embedded in pre-defined and desired social and/or ecological scenarios. Dynamic management frameworks that couple social and ecological systems as described in this paper can facilitate the efficient and effective utilization of resources, reduce uncertainty for decision and policy makers, and lead to more defensible decisions on resources.

Addressing cumulative effects, maritime conflicts and ecosystem services threats through MSP-oriented geospatial webtools

Menegon S, Depellegrin D, Farella G, Sarretta A, Venier C, Barbanti A. Addressing cumulative effects, maritime conflicts and ecosystem services threats through MSP-oriented geospatial webtools. Ocean & Coastal Management [Internet]. 2018 ;163:417 - 436. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0964569118302023
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

To solve conservation and planning challenges in the marine environment, researchers are increasingly developing geospatial tools to address impacts of anthropogenic activities on marine biodiversity. The paper presents a comprehensive set of built-in geospatial webtools to support Maritime Spatial Planning (MSP) and environmental management objectives implemented into the Tools4MSP interoperable GeoPlatform. The webtools include cumulative effects assessment (CEA), maritime use conflict (MUC) analysis, MSFD pressure-driven CEA and a CEA-based marine ecosystem service threat analysis (MES-Threat). The tools are tested for the Northern Adriatic (NA) Sea, one of the most industrialized sea areas of Europe using a case study driven modelling strategy. Overall results show that coastal areas within 0–9 nm in the Gulf of Trieste, Grado-Marano and Venice lagoon and Po Delta outlet are subjected to intense cumulative effects and high sea use conflicts mainly from port activities, fishery, coastal and maritime tourism and maritime shipping. Linking MES into CEA provided novel information on locally threatened high MES supporting and provisioning habitats such Cymodocea beds and infralittoral fine sands, threats to cultural MES are most pronounced in coastal areas. Results are discussed for their geospatial relevance for regional planning, resource management and their applicability within MSP and environmental assessment.

Oil and gas infrastructure decommissioning in marine protected areas: System complexity, analysis and challenges

Burdon D, Barnard S, Boyes SJ, Elliott M. Oil and gas infrastructure decommissioning in marine protected areas: System complexity, analysis and challenges. Marine Pollution Bulletin [Internet]. 2018 ;135:739 - 758. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025326X18305642
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Many offshore oil and gas production facilities are nearing the end of their operational life, with decommissioning now becoming a global challenge. The compatibility of decommissioning operations to marine protected areas (MPAs) creates further challenges. The recently-developed DAPSI(W)R(M) problem structuring framework (covering Drivers, Activities, Pressures, State changes, Impacts (on Welfare) and Responses (as Measures)) was applied here to interrogate the complexity of decommissioning oil and gas infrastructure within MPAs, with outputs feeding into the development of a novel database tool for Screening Potential Impacts of Decommissioning Activities (SPIDA). In meeting the current requirements of the marine regulatory regime, SPIDA provides a more streamlined, evidence-based process which can be applied by industry, statutory nature conservation bodies and regulators for identifying and evaluating evidence that supports the implications of decommissioning alternatives on the condition of MPAs. SPIDA has been developed to be adapted for other activities and sectors, including offshore renewables.

Linking humans to food webs: a framework for the classification of global fisheries

Bieg C, McCann KS, McMeans BC, Rooney N, Holtgrieve GW, Lek S, Bun NPeng, KC KB, Fraser E. Linking humans to food webs: a framework for the classification of global fisheries. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment [Internet]. 2018 . Available from: https://esajournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/fee.1933
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $38.00
Type: Journal Article

There is a widely acknowledged need to explicitly include humans in our conceptual and mathematical models of food webs. However, a simple and generalized method for incorporating humans into fisheries food webs has yet to be established. We developed a simple graphical framework for defining whole‐system inland fishery food webs that includes a continuum of fishery behaviors. This range of behaviors mimics those of generalist to specialist predators, which differentially influence ecosystem diversity, sustainability, and functioning. Fishery behaviors in this food‐web context are predicted to produce a range of “fishery types” – from targeted (ie specialist) to multispecies (ie generalist) inland fisheries – and relate to the socioeconomic status of fishery participants. Fishery participants in countries with low Human Development Index (HDI) values are highly connected through fisheries food webs relative to humans in more developed countries. Our framework shows that fisheries can occupy a variety of roles within a food‐web model and may thereby affect food‐web stability in different ways. This realization could help to improve sustainable fisheries management at a global scale.

Leveraging vessel traffic data and a temporary fishing closure to inform marine management

Elahi R, Ferretti F, Bastari A, Cerrano C, Colloca F, Kowalik J, Ruckelshaus M, Struck A, Micheli F. Leveraging vessel traffic data and a temporary fishing closure to inform marine management. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment [Internet]. 2018 . Available from: https://esajournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/fee.1936
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $38.00
Type: Journal Article

The benefits of protected areas depend on compliance, and achieving protection remains a challenge in intensely used areas where conservation and socioeconomic goals are in real or apparent conflict. One recent innovation – satellite tracking of commercial fishing vessels – has been introduced to help with ocean protection initiatives and build trust between fishers and managers. We paired vessel traffic data before and during a temporary closure in the Adriatic Sea with data on fish nursery habitat to examine changes in fishing effort and their potential consequences. Trawlers generally complied with the closure but maintained overall effort by trawling more intensely outside of the no‐trawl zone, especially near its borders and closer to shore. We detected stronger than expected fishing effort in a sub‐region within the protected area, suggesting that this location should be closely monitored for compliance. Notably, fishing effort was relocated to nursery grounds for some exploited species, illustrating the importance of understanding species’ life histories and habitat distribution in the design of protected areas.

Marine animal forests as useful indicators of entanglement by marine litter

Galgani F, Pham CK, Claro F, Consoli P. Marine animal forests as useful indicators of entanglement by marine litter. Marine Pollution Bulletin [Internet]. 2018 ;135:735 - 738. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025326X1830568X
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Entanglement of marine fauna is one of the principal impacts of marine litter, with an incidence that can vary strongly according to regions, the type and the quantity of marine litter. On the seafloor, areas dominated by sessile suspension feeders, such as tropical coral reefs or deep-sea coral and sponge aggregations, have been termed “animal forests” and have a strong potential to monitor the temporal and spatial trends of entanglement by marine litter, especially fishing gears. Several characteristics of these organisms represent advantages while avoiding constraints and bias. Biological constraints and logistical aspects, including tools, are discussed to better define a strategy for supporting long-term evaluation of accumulation and entanglement of marine litter.

Recreational fishers’ support for no-take marine reserves is high and increases with reserve age

Navarro M, Kragt ME, Hailu A, Langlois TJ. Recreational fishers’ support for no-take marine reserves is high and increases with reserve age. Marine Policy [Internet]. 2018 ;96:44 - 52. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X18301611
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

No-take marine reserves are essential for scientific monitoring, likely to contribute to the sustainability of targeted species, help to buffer biodiversity loss due to climate change impacts, and provide public education, tourism and diverse economic benefits to local communities. However, the establishment of no-take marine reserves has been a contentious policy in several countries because of a perception that recreational fishers are opposed to reserves. Nevertheless, it is unclear whether negative perceptions about reserves are widespread amongst recreational fishers, and whether perceptions change after the reserve has been created. In this study, recreational fishers were surveyed in ten Australian marine parks to determine levels of support and beliefs about the benefits and costs of no-take marine reserves. A ‘space-for-time’ approach was used to explore whether support is higher in older reserves. The results suggest that most recreational fishers who fish in established marine parks are supportive of the no-take marine reserves within them. On average, 63.3% of fishers support no-take marine reserves in their marine park, and 17.8% are opposed. Further, recreational fishers’ support for no-take marine reserves increases markedly with reserve age. This research indicates that most recreational fishers are supportive of no-take marine reserves within marine parks and that support increases over time.

Ingestion and contact with polyethylene microplastics does not cause acute toxicity on marine zooplankton

Beiras R, Bellas J, Cachot J, Cormier B, Cousin X, Engwall M, Gambardella C, Garaventa F, Keiter S, Le Bihanic F, et al. Ingestion and contact with polyethylene microplastics does not cause acute toxicity on marine zooplankton. Journal of Hazardous Materials [Internet]. In Press . Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304389418306617#!
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $41.95
Type: Journal Article

Toxicity of polyethylene microplastics (PE-MP) of size ranges similar to their natural food to zooplanktonic organisms representative of the main taxa present in marine plankton, including rotifers, copepods, bivalves, echinoderms and fish, was evaluated. Early life stages (ELS) were prioritized as testing models in order to maximize sensitivity. Treatments included particles spiked with benzophenone-3 (BP-3), a hydrophobic organic chemical used in cosmetics with direct input in coastal areas. Despite documented ingestion of both virgin and BP-3 spiked microplastics no acute toxicity was found at loads orders of magnitude above environmentally relevant concentrations on any of the invertebrate models. In fish tests some effects, including premature or reduced hatching, were observed after 12 d exposure at 10 mg L-1 of BP-3 spiked PE-MP. The results obtained do not support environmentally relevant risk of microplastics on marine zooplankton. Similar approaches testing more hydrophobic chemicals with higher acute toxicity are needed before these conclusions could be extended to other organic pollutants common in marine ecosystems. Therefore, the replacement of these polymers in consumer products must be carefully considered.

Pages

Subscribe to OpenChannels Literature Library