Literature Library

Currently indexing 7656 titles

A multiple-species framework for integrating movement processes across life stages into the design of marine protected areas

D'Aloia CC, Daigle RM, Côté IM, Curtis JMR, Guichard F, Fortin M-J. A multiple-species framework for integrating movement processes across life stages into the design of marine protected areas. Biological Conservation [Internet]. 2017 ;216:93 - 100. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006320717306675
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

A major objective of marine protected area (MPA) network design is to ensure the persistence of species with diverse life histories and functional traits. Considering how species differ in their propensity to move within and between MPAs is therefore a key consideration for multi-species MPA network design. Here, we propose a conceptual framework to incorporate ecological processes that affect movement at multiple life stages into the MPA network design process. We illustrate how our framework can be implemented using a set of hypothetical species that represent regional trait diversity in coastal British Columbia, Canada. We focused on two ecological processes: (1) dispersal during the larval phase and (2) daily home range movement during the adult phase. To identify functional connectivity patterns, we used a biophysical model to simulate larval dispersal, and then prioritized highly-connected patches using a reserve selection algorithm. To ensure that individual reserves were commensurate with home ranges, we also imposed reserve size constraints. Candidate areas for protection were identified based on multi-species connectivity patterns and home range size constraints. Collectively, this conceptual framework offers a flexible approach to multi-species, cross-life stage conservation planning, which can be further adapted to address complex life histories. As marine conservation efforts around the globe aim to design ecologically connected networks of protected areas, the integration of movement and connectivity data throughout ontogeny will be a key component of effective multi-species MPA network design.

Does It Work for Biodiversity? Experiences and Challenges in the Evaluation of Social Marketing Campaigns

Veríssimo D, Bianchessi A, Arrivillaga A, Cadiz FCeasar, Mancao R, Green K. Does It Work for Biodiversity? Experiences and Challenges in the Evaluation of Social Marketing Campaigns. Social Marketing Quarterly [Internet]. 2017 :152450041773480. Available from: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1524500417734806
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $36.00
Type: Journal Article

There is a growing realization among conservationists that human behavior is the main driver of all key threats to biodiversity and the environment. This realization has led to an escalation of the efforts to influence human behavior toward the adoption of more sustainable alternatives, more recently through the use of social marketing theory and tools. However, these initiatives have traditionally suffered from a lack of robust impact evaluation, which limits not only accountability but also a practitioner’s ability to learn and improve over time. We evaluated three social marketing campaigns conducted in the Philippines, which aimed at increasing the sustainability of local fisheries. To achieve this, we used the results not only from questionnaire surveys but also from biological and enforcement data. We found that although there is some evidence of impact around human behavior and perceptions of conservation results, those changes did not translate into biological outcomes during the 2-year time frame considered in this evaluation. We discuss many of the barriers to causal inference that still remain, particularly if causal links between outcomes and specific interventions are to be drawn, but also showcase how this current methodology can help us go further than the more basic approaches to impact evaluation commonly used. Lastly, we highlight a number of lessons learned from this experience in seeking a practical, ethical, and effective approach to impact evaluation.

Abundance-occupancy relationships in deep sea wood fall communities

Webb TJ, Barry JP, McClain CR. Abundance-occupancy relationships in deep sea wood fall communities. Ecography [Internet]. 2017 ;40(11):1339 - 1347. Available from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ecog.02618/abstract
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The generally positive relationship between the number of sites a species occupies and its average abundance within those sites provides an important link between population processes occurring at different spatial scales. Although such abundance–occupancy relationships (AORs) have been documented across a very wide range of taxa and in many different environments, little is known of such patterns in Earth's largest ecosystem, the deep sea. Wood falls – derived from natural or anthropogenic inputs of wood into the oceans – constitute an important deep-sea habitat, habouring their own unique communities ultimately entirely dependent on the wood for chemical energy. In this study we take advantage of the unique features of an experimental wood fall deployment to examine AORs for the first time in deep-sea invertebrates. The study design combines advantages of both experimental (tractability, control of key environmental parameters) and observational (natural colonisation by taxonomically diverse communities) studies. We show that the interspecific AOR is strongly positive across the 48 species occurring over 32 wood fall communities. The precise form of the AOR is mediated by both species-level life history (body size) and by the colonisation stage at which communities were harvested, but not by environmental energy (wood fall size). Temporal dynamics within species are also generally consistent with positive intraspecific AORs. This support for positive AORs in the deep sea is an important extension of a macroecological generality into a new environment offering considerable potential for further testing and developing mechanistic macroecological theories.

Opportunities for improving global marine conservation through multilateral treaties

Al-Abdulrazzak D, Galland GR, McClenachan L, Hocevar J. Opportunities for improving global marine conservation through multilateral treaties. Marine Policy [Internet]. 2017 ;86:247 - 252. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X17300118
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

The speed and scale of human impacts on marine species, such as climate change and exploitation for international markets, coupled with a poor regulatory regime and lack of enforcement, make it especially difficult to protect marine species beyond areas of national jurisdiction. Yet as the number of multilateral treaties continues to grow, the declining state of the world's oceans suggest that these treaties are largely failing to fulfill their missions and achieve meaningful protection. Here, an analysis of all multilateral treaties governing activities related to oceans is provided. A range of issues is examined including efficacy, geographic and taxonomic distribution, and other factors that facilitate or inhibit conservation. Since 1882, 103 countries have signed 265 multilateral treaties related to the management of marine resources. The majority of treaties (51%) deal with fisheries, 30% deal with pollution, 4% marine mammals and 15% deal with other topics. In terms of factors that may predict efficacy, 65% of marine treaties have secretariats, 50% have scientific mandates, and 13% have enforcement mechanisms; only 9% have all three. Given the context of the United Nations General Assembly's new commitment to manage human activity and its impact on common resources on the high seas, it is important to understand the strengths and weaknesses – individually and cumulatively - of existing binding marine agreements.

Connectivity, persistence, and loss of high abundance areas of a recovering marine fish population in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean

Boudreau SA, Shackell NL, Carson S, Heyer CE den. Connectivity, persistence, and loss of high abundance areas of a recovering marine fish population in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean. Ecology and Evolution [Internet]. 2017 . Available from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ece3.3495/full
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

In the early 1990s, the Northwest Atlantic Ocean underwent a fisheries-driven ecosystem shift. Today, the iconic cod (Gadus morhua) remains at low levels, while Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus) has been increasing since the mid-2000s, concomitant with increasing interest from the fishing industry. Currently, our knowledge about halibut ecology is limited, and the lack of recovery in other collapsed groundfish populations has highlighted the danger of overfishing local concentrations. Here, we apply a Bayesian hierarchical spatiotemporal approach to model the spatial structure of juvenile Atlantic halibut over 36 years and three fisheries management regimes using three model parameters to characterize the resulting spatiotemporal abundance structure: persistence (similarity of spatial structure over time), connectivity (coherence of temporal pattern over space), and spatial variance (variation across the seascape). Two areas of high juvenile abundance persisted through three decades whereas two in the northeast are now diminished, despite the increased abundance and landings throughout the management units. The persistent areas overlap with full and seasonal area closures, which may act as refuges from fishing. Connectivity was estimated to be 250 km, an order of magnitude less than the distance assumed by the definition of the Canadian management units (~2,000 km). The underlying question of whether there are distinct populations within the southern stock unit cannot be answered with this model, but the smaller ~250 km scale of coherent temporal patterns suggests more complex population structure than previously thought, which should be taken into consideration by fishery management.

Chemoreception drives plastic consumption in a hard coral

Allen AS, Seymour AC, Rittschof D. Chemoreception drives plastic consumption in a hard coral. Marine Pollution Bulletin [Internet]. 2017 ;124(1):198 - 205. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025326X17306112?via%3Dihub
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

The drivers behind microplastic (up to 5 mm in diameter) consumption by animals are uncertain and impacts on foundational species are poorly understood. We investigated consumption of weathered, unfouled, biofouled, pre-production and microbe-free National Institute of Standards plastic by a scleractinian coral that relies on chemosensory cues for feeding. Experiment one found that corals ingested many plastic types while mostly ignoring organic-free sand, suggesting that plastic contains phagostimulents. Experiment two found that corals ingested more plastic that wasn't covered in a microbial biofilm than plastics that were biofilmed. Additionally, corals retained ~ 8% of ingested plastic for 24 h or more and retained particles appeared stuck in corals, with consequences for energetics, pollutant toxicity and trophic transfer. The potential for chemoreception to drive plastic consumption in marine taxa has implications for conservation.

Climate Change: Information on Potential Economic Effects Could Help Guide Federal Efforts to Reduce Fiscal Exposure

Anon. Climate Change: Information on Potential Economic Effects Could Help Guide Federal Efforts to Reduce Fiscal Exposure. Washington, D.C.: United States Government Accountability Office; 2017. Available from: http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-17-720?wpisrc=nl_energy202&wpmm=1
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
Yes
Type: Report

Over the last decade, extreme weather and fire events have cost the federal government over $350 billion, according to the Office of Management and Budget. These costs will likely rise as the climate changes, according to the U.S. Global Change Research Program. In February 2013, GAO included Limiting the Federal Government’s Fiscal Exposure by Better Managing Climate Change Risks on its High-Risk List.

GAO was asked to review the potential economic effects of climate change and risks to the federal government. This report examines (1) methods used to estimate the potential economic effects of climate change in the United States, (2) what is known about these effects, and (3) the extent to which information about these effects could inform efforts to manage climate risks across the federal government. GAO reviewed 2 national-scale studies available and 28 other studies; interviewed 26 experts knowledgeable about the strengths and limitations of the studies; compared federal efforts to manage climate risks with leading practices for risk management and economic analysis; and obtained expert views. 

Marine protected area restricts demographic connectivity: Dissimilarity in a marine environment can function as a biological barrier

Sato M, Honda K, Uy WH, Baslot DI, Genovia TG, Nakamura Y, Bernardo LPatrick C, Kurokochi H, Pantallano ADuvin S, Lian C, et al. Marine protected area restricts demographic connectivity: Dissimilarity in a marine environment can function as a biological barrier. Ecology and Evolution [Internet]. 2017 ;7(19):7859 - 7871. Available from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ece3.3318/abstract
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The establishment of marine protected areas (MPAs) can often lead to environmental differences between MPAs and fishing zones. To determine the effects on marine dispersal of environmental dissimilarity between an MPA and fishing zone, we examined the abundance and recruitment patterns of two anemonefishes (Amphiprion frenatus and A. perideraion) that inhabit sea anemones in different management zones (i.e., an MPA and two fishing zones) by performing a field survey and a genetic parentage analysis. We found lower levels of abundance per anemone in the MPA compared to the fishing zones for both species (n = 1,525 anemones, p = .032). The parentage analysis also showed that lower numbers of fishes were recruited from the fishing zones and outside of the study area into each anemone in the MPA than into each anemone in the fishing zones (n = 1,525 anemones, p < .017). However, the number of self‐recruit production per female did not differ between the MPA and fishing zones (n = 384 females, p = .516). Because the ocean currents around the study site were unlikely to cause a lower settlement intensity of larvae in the MPA, the ocean circulation was not considered crucial to the observed abundance and recruitment patterns. Instead, stronger top‐down control and/or a lower density of host anemones in the MPA were potential factors for such patterns. Our results highlight the importance of dissimilarity in a marine environment as a factor that affects connectivity.

Spatial management in small-scale fisheries: A potential approach for climate change adaptation in Pacific Islands

Le Cornu E, Doerr AN, Finkbeiner EM, Gourlie D, Crowder LB. Spatial management in small-scale fisheries: A potential approach for climate change adaptation in Pacific Islands. Marine Policy [Internet]. 2017 . Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X17301690
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Small-scale fisheries are undeniably important for livelihoods, food security and income around the globe. However, they face major challenges, including global market and demographic shifts, policy changes and climate variations that may threaten the wellbeing, health and safety of fishing communities. Over the years, various forms of spatial management have been implemented in small-scale fisheries as a potential solution to problems afflicting these systems. The benefits of such approaches can be numerous for both ecosystems and coastal communities. In addition to the persistent challenges influencing small-scale fisheries practices, the emerging effects of climate change pose serious risks to coastal ecosystems and fishing communities, especially in low-lying islands. Despite a growing recognition of both the benefits of spatial management and the adverse effects of climate change on small-scale fisheries, integration of these concepts in a consistent and comprehensive way has not yet occurred. Spatial management has the potential to foster small-scale fisheries adaptation to climate change, however, in the face of such a global and transboundary phenomenon, management strategies will need to be carefully designed and implemented. First, key considerations for climate-informed spatial management in small-scale fisheries were identified. Second, these key considerations were illustrated in two selected case studies in Pacific Island countries and territories (i.e. Fiji and Papua New Guinea). Finally, the challenges associated with spatial management in a changing climate are discussed and ways forward for advancing this type of management as a climate adaptation approach for small-scale fisheries in the Pacific and beyond are proposed.

Sampling effects on the effectiveness of ecological indicators in detecting fishery-induced community changes

Zhang C, Chen Y, Xu B, Xue Y, Ren Y. Sampling effects on the effectiveness of ecological indicators in detecting fishery-induced community changes. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences [Internet]. 2017 . Available from: http://www.nrcresearchpress.com/doi/abs/10.1139/cjfas-2017-0199#.WeZW-ky-KqA
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $30.00
Type: Journal Article

Effective ecological indicators (EI) should reflect changes to ecosystem status in a timely manner to guide fishery management; however, the robustness of EIs in the face of sampling uncertainty is not well understood and sampling errors may result in delayed or even unhelpful actions for management. In this study, we use a size-spectrum model to evaluate the effectiveness of EIs in detecting fishery-induced ecosystem changes given various levels of sampling uncertainty. We demonstrate that there is a time-lag exists between changes in fishing pressure and EIs response. The selectivity of survey gears can strongly determine the level of EI responses within certain size ranges. EIs may lost statistical power once sampling errors exceed a certain level, implying that several decades of monitoring data may be needed to be sure of detecting even a large change. Multivariate methods can strengthen the statistical powers of EIs, but only when the level of sampling noises is low. This study suggests the need for considering the impact of sampling uncertainty on the use of ecological indicators in fisheries management.

The role of shellfish aquaculture in reduction of eutrophication in an urban estuary

Bricker SB, Ferreira JGomes, Zhu C, Rose JM, Galimany E, Wikfors G, Saurel C, Miller RLandeck, Wands J, Trowbridge P, et al. The role of shellfish aquaculture in reduction of eutrophication in an urban estuary. Environmental Science & Technology [Internet]. 2017 . Available from: http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acs.est.7b03970
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $40.00
Type: Journal Article

Mitigating coastal eutrophication is a global challenge. In many places where land-based management has reduced nutrient discharges, coastal waterbodies remain impaired. This study examined ‘bioextraction’ of nutrients from the water by oyster aquaculture in Long Island Sound, Connecticut, as an example of how aquaculture might complement land-based measures in urban estuaries. Eutrophication status, nutrient removal, and ecosystem service value were estimated through eutrophication assessment, application of hydrologic, circulation, and local- and ecosystem-scale models, and economic valuation. System-scale modeling estimated that current oyster aquaculture, via sequestration into tissue and shell only, removes an equivalent of 1.31%, and expanded production could remove 2.68%, of total annual land-based nitrogen inputs by aquaculture alone. Up-scaled local-scale results were similar to results from the system-scale modeling, suggesting that this upscaling method could be useful in waterbodies without circulation models. The minimum value of the ecosystem service of nitrogen removed by oyster production was estimated by means of an avoided costs method, which uses the cost of alternative nutrient management measures such as wastewater treatement and urban Best Management Practices to estimate the value of the removed nitrogen, to be $8.5 million per year, with maximum value at expanded production of $470 million per year. Removal and value estimates are conservative because they do not include removal by clams in Connecticut due to the lack of a clam model, or by oysters and clams in New York due to data limitations, nor denitrification losses. If oyster associated removal from all Connecticut and New York lease acres (5% of bottom area) and denitrification losses for both states are included, nitrogen removal estimates increase to 10% – 30% of total annual inputs. The total N removal could be higher if removal by clams is included. Additional research is needed for inclusion of shellfish growers in nutrient trading programs. These optimistic results are specific to Long Island Sound but the modeling approach is transferable and can be used to evaluate possible contribution by shellfish aquaculture in other urban estuaries.

Assessing the living and dead proportions of cold-water coral colonies: implications for deep-water Marine Protected Area monitoring in a changing ocean

Vad J, Orejas C, Moreno-Navas J, Findlay HS, J. Roberts M. Assessing the living and dead proportions of cold-water coral colonies: implications for deep-water Marine Protected Area monitoring in a changing ocean. PeerJ [Internet]. 2017 ;5:e3705. Available from: https://peerj.com/articles/3705/
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Coral growth patterns result from an interplay of coral biology and environmental conditions. In this study colony size and proportion of live and dead skeletons in the cold-water coral (CWC) Lophelia pertusa(Linnaeus, 1758) were measured using video footage from Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) transects conducted at the inshore Mingulay Reef Complex (MRC) and at the offshore PISCES site (Rockall Bank) in the NE Atlantic. The main goal of this paper was to explore the development of a simple method to quantify coral growth and its potential application as an assessment tool of the health of these remote habitats. Eighteen colonies were selected and whole colony and dead/living layer size were measured. Live to dead layer ratios for each colony were then determined and analysed. The age of each colony was estimated using previously published data. Our paper shows that: (1) two distinct morphotypes can be described: at the MRC, colonies displayed a ‘cauliflower-shaped’ morphotype whereas at the PISCES site, colonies presented a more flattened ‘bush-shaped’ morphotype; (2) living layer size was positively correlated with whole colony size; (3) live to dead layer ratio was negatively correlated to whole colony size; (4) live to dead layer ratio never exceeded 0.27. These results suggest that as a colony develops and its growth rate slows down, the proportion of living polyps in the colony decreases. Furthermore, at least 73% of L. pertusa colonies are composed of exposed dead coral skeleton, vulnerable to ocean acidification and the associated shallowing of the aragonite saturation horizon, with significant implications for future deep-sea reef framework integrity. The clear visual contrast between white/pale living and grey/dark dead portions of the colonies also gives a new way by which they can be visually monitored over time. The increased use of marine autonomous survey vehicles offers an important new platform from which such a surveying technique could be applied to monitor deep-water marine protected areas in the future.

Men ask more questions than women at a scientific conference

Hinsley A, Sutherland WJ, Johnston A. Men ask more questions than women at a scientific conference Pavlova MA. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2017 ;12(10):e0185534. Available from: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0185534
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Gender inequity in science and academia, especially in senior positions, is a recognised problem. The reasons are poorly understood, but include the persistence of historical gender ratios, discrimination and other factors, including gender-based behavioural differences. We studied participation in a professional context by observing question-asking behaviour at a large international conference with a clear equality code of conduct that prohibited any form of discrimination. Accounting for audience gender ratio, male attendees asked 1.8 questions for each question asked by a female attendee. Amongst only younger researchers, male attendees also asked 1.8 questions per female question, suggesting the pattern cannot be attributed to the temporary problem of demographic inertia. We link our findings to the ‘chilly’ climate for women in STEM, including wider experiences of discrimination likely encountered by women throughout their education and careers. We call for a broader and coordinated approach to understanding and addressing the barriers to women and other under-represented groups. We encourage the scientific community to recognise the context in which these gender differences occur, and evaluate and develop methods to support full participation from all attendees.

Species identity and depth predict bleaching severity in reef-building corals: shall the deep inherit the reef?

Muir PR, Marshall PA, Abdulla A, J. Aguirre D. Species identity and depth predict bleaching severity in reef-building corals: shall the deep inherit the reef?. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences [Internet]. 2017 ;284(1864):20171551. Available from: http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/284/1864/20171551
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $29.25
Type: Journal Article

Mass bleaching associated with unusually high sea temperatures represents one of the greatest threats to corals and coral reef ecosystems. Deeper reef areas are hypothesized as potential refugia, but the susceptibility of Scleractinian species over depth has not been quantified. During the most severe bleaching event on record, we found up to 83% of coral cover severely affected on Maldivian reefs at a depth of 3–5 m, but significantly reduced effects at 24–30 m. Analysis of 153 species' responses showed depth, shading and species identity had strong, significant effects on susceptibility. Overall, 73.3% of the shallow-reef assemblage had individuals at a depth of 24–30 m with reduced effects, potentially mitigating local extinction and providing a source of recruits for population recovery. Although susceptibility was phylogenetically constrained, species-level effects caused most lineages to contain some partially resistant species. Many genera showed wide variation between species, including Acropora, previously considered highly susceptible. Extinction risk estimates showed species and lineages of concern and those likely to dominate following repeated events. Our results show that deeper reef areas provide refuge for a large proportion of Scleractinian species during severe bleaching events and that the deepest occurring individuals of each population have the greatest potential to survive and drive reef recovery.

Study on the management of marine economic zoning: An integrated framework for China

Gao J-zhu, Liu C-ji, He G-shun, Wang T. Study on the management of marine economic zoning: An integrated framework for China. Ocean & Coastal Management [Internet]. 2017 ;149:165 - 174. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0964569117303988
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

The paper uses economic zoning methods, marine spatial planning methods, and marine functional zoning methods to construct an evaluation system which considers factors such as social and economic development, carrying capacity on resource and environment, marine development and utilization, and regional development potential. As comprehensive indices, the factors are directly related to the regional marine economic development. Using the evaluation characteristics of different types of marine economic regional development, this paper applies the matrix discriminant method of regional divisions to form the judgment matrix of marine economic areas. With the actual evaluation results of sea area indices, it determines the type of marine economic zoning and proposes a reasonable marine economic zoning scheme. Simultaneously, the adopted methods and system are simple and practical, and general theories of economic and marine zoning are used.

Umbrellas can work under water: Using threatened species as indicator and management surrogates can improve coastal conservation

Gilby BL, Olds AD, Connolly RM, Yabsley NA, Maxwell PS, Tibbetts IR, Schoeman DS, Schlacher TA. Umbrellas can work under water: Using threatened species as indicator and management surrogates can improve coastal conservation. Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science [Internet]. 2017 ;199:132 - 140. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0272771417309216
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

Species surrogates, the use of particular species to index habitat condition or to represent ecological assemblages are commonly identified in many ecosystems, but are less tested, and therefore less employed in estuaries. Estuaries provide important ecosystem goods (e.g. harvestable species) and services (e.g. carbon processing, coastal armouring), but require protection from multiple human activities, meaning that finding surrogates for estuarine condition or faunal assemblages is a significant knowledge gap. In this study, we test the efficacy of the threatened estuary ray Hemitrygon fluviorum, as a suitable indicator of ecosystem condition and management umbrella surrogate species for conservation prioritisation and monitoring purposes within estuaries. We surveyed fish assemblages and ray presence at ten sites within each of 22 estuaries in southeast Queensland, Australia, using one hour deployments of baited video arrays. We then tested for correlations between ray presence, a series of environmental variables considered important to ecosystem management within estuaries (i.e. testing rays as indicator species), and the co-occurring fish species (i.e. testing rays as umbrella species). Estuary rays function as both umbrella species and ecological indicators of habitat status in subtropical Australian estuaries. As umbrellas, ray occurrence concords with elevated species richness. As ecological indicators, ray distribution concords with habitats of good water quality (especially low turbidity) and more natural vegetation remaining in the catchment. These results highlight the potential for other threatened aquatic vertebrates that are both readily detectable and that are reliable proxies for ecosystems status to be become useful management tools in estuaries. The protection of such large, threatened species in coastal seascapes allows managers to address multiple targets for conservation, especially; (1) protecting species of conservation concern; (2) maintaining diversity; and (3) protecting optimal habitats by better placing reserves.

Export of Plastic Debris by Rivers into the Sea

Schmidt C, Krauth T, Wagner S. Export of Plastic Debris by Rivers into the Sea. Environmental Science & Technology [Internet]. 2017 . Available from: http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acs.est.7b02368
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $40.00
Type: Journal Article

A substantial fraction of marine plastic debris originates from land-based sources and rivers potentially act as a major transport pathway for all sizes of plastic debris. We analyzed a global compilation of data on plastic debris in the water column across a wide range of river sizes. Plastic debris loads, both microplastic (particles <5 mm) and macroplastic (particles >5 mm) are positively related to the mismanaged plastic waste (MMPW) generated in the river catchments. This relationship is nonlinear where large rivers with  population-rich catchments delivering a disproportionately higher fraction of MMPW into the sea. The 10 top-ranked rivers transport 88–95% of the global load into the sea. Using MMPW as a predictor we calculate the global plastic debris inputs form rivers into the sea to range between 0.41 and 4 × 106 t/y. Due to the limited amount of data high uncertainties were expected and ultimately confirmed. The empirical analysis to quantify plastic loads in rivers can be extended easily by additional potential predictors other than MMPW, for example, hydrological conditions.

Shading as a mitigation tool for coral bleaching in three common Indo-Pacific species

Coelho VR, Fenner D, Caruso C, Bayles BR, Huang Y, Birkeland C. Shading as a mitigation tool for coral bleaching in three common Indo-Pacific species. Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology [Internet]. 2017 ;497:152 - 163. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022098117300114
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Shading substantially reduced the degree of bleaching in Acropora muricataPocillopora damicornis and Porites cylindrica in American Samoa. Experiments were conducted outdoors at two sites on Ofu and Tutuila Islands. An aquarium experiment was set up near some reef-flat pools in the National Park of American Samoa on Ofu Island, using different levels of shading (none, 50% and 75%) early in conditions of cumulative thermal stress corresponding to NOAA's Coral Reef Watch-Bleaching Alert System. We analyzed the effects of cumulative thermal stress regarding coral growth, as well as color changes (evaluated using a standardize reference card) as a proxy for decreases in symbiontdensity and chlorophyll a content (i.e. bleaching). Thermally stressed corals grew less than controls, but corals without shading experienced a more substantial decrease in growth compared to those under 50% or 75% shade. The analysis of coral color showed that both levels of shading were protective against bleaching in conditions of cumulative thermal stress for all species, but were particularly beneficial for the most sensitive ones: A. muricata and P. cylindrica. Heavier shading (75%) offered better protection than lighter shading (50%) in this experiment, possibly because of the intense light levels corals were subjected to. Although there were limits to the extent shading could mitigate the effects of cumulative heating, it was very effective to at least Degree Heating Week (DHW) 4 and continued to offer some protection until the end of the study (DHW 8). In Tutuila, a shaded/not-shaded platform experiment was carried out in a reef pool in which corals have shown repeated annual summer bleaching for several years. This experiment was designed to investigate if shading could attenuate bleaching in the field and also if there were negative consequences to shading removal. The only factor controlled was light intensity, and our main conclusion was that overall corals on the platform became darker than field colonies in response to shading, but adjusted back to the same color level as field colonies after shade removal. However, the latter results are preliminary and need to be confirmed by future studies under more controlled conditions. As bleaching becomes more frequent and regular due to global warming, we should consider proactively using shading to help mitigate the effects of thermal stress and prolong the survival of at least some coral communities, until solutions to address global climate change become effective.

Using experiential marine debris education to make an impact: Collecting debris, informing policy makers, and influencing students

Owens KA. Using experiential marine debris education to make an impact: Collecting debris, informing policy makers, and influencing students. Marine Pollution Bulletin [Internet]. 2017 . Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025326X17308056
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

The Shore to Statehouse project supported the creation of an open-source, replicable, undergraduate experiential course on marine debris. Funded by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the course allowed undergraduate students in Connecticut, USA, to collect marine debris locally, then create a policy report for state legislators. Here we share the results of the project including data on four accumulation surveys on the Long Island Sound, as well as the impact on student motivation, attitudes, and behavior levels. Results include finding over 1600 individual pieces of debris totaling 19.4 kg (42.8 lb). In addition, the students experienced statistically significant improvements in knowledge and behavior scores. This open-source course can be replicated, empowering students to remove debris, provide important information to local policy makers, and improve knowledge and behavior.

Artificial reefs as a means of spreading diving pressure in a coral reef environment

Tynyakov J, Rousseau M, Chen M, Figus O, Belhassen Y, Shashar N. Artificial reefs as a means of spreading diving pressure in a coral reef environment. Ocean & Coastal Management [Internet]. 2017 ;149:159 - 164. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0964569117305537
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

Recreational diving damages coral reefs despite heightened environmental awareness. However, divers prefer preserved coral reefs and therefore reef degradation presents an economic loss. Artificial reefs were suggested among a range of tools to mitigate and reduce divers' negative impact on coral reefs.

Coral reefs in Eilat (northern tip of the Red Sea) are among the most densely dived reefs in the world, with an estimated number of dives of up to 350,000 dives a year. At least 7 artificial reefs were deployed in the coastal waters of Eilat, however the divers' visitation on these reefs is not tracked regularly.

We found that more than one third of the total dives take place on artificial reefs in Eilat. The divers prefer to vary their diving sites and possess a desire to diversify and expand their diving experience. Thus, the divers are also willing to dive a on artificial reefs, and this is true for both novice and experienced divers. This indicates that artificial reefs can draw divers from natural reefs, thus reducing diving pressure and allowing more sustainable levels of diving on natural coral reefs. This leads us to a conclusion that artificial reefs may be useful in modern reef conservation approaches.

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