Literature Library

Currently indexing 9774 titles

Global terrestrial distribution of penguins (Spheniscidae) and their conservation by protected areas

Hickcox RP, Jara M, Deacon LAK, Harvey LP, Pincheira-Donoso D. Global terrestrial distribution of penguins (Spheniscidae) and their conservation by protected areas. Biodiversity and Conservation [Internet]. 2019 . Available from: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10531-019-01801-z
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Establishing protected areas (PAs) ranks among the top priority actions to mitigate the global scale of modern biodiversity declines. However, the distribution of biodiversity is spatially asymmetric among regions and lineages, and the extent to which PAs offer effective protection for species and ecosystems remains uncertain. Penguins, regarded as prime bioindicator birds of the ecological health of their terrestrial and marine habitats, represent priority targets for such quantitative assessments. Of the world’s 18 penguin species, eleven are undergoing population declines, for which ten are classified as ‘Vulnerable’ or ‘Endangered’. Here, we employ a global-scale dataset to quantify the extent to which their terrestrial breeding areas are currently protected by PAs. Using quantitative methods for spatial ecology, we compare the global distribution of penguin colonies, including range and population size analyses, with the distribution of terrestrial PAs classified by the International Union for Conservation of Nature, and generate hotspot and endemism maps worldwide. Our assessment quantitatively reveals < 40% of the terrestrial range of eleven penguin species is currently protected, and that range size is the significant factor in determining PA protection. We also show that there are seven global hotspots of penguin biodiversity where four or five penguin species breed. We suggest that future penguin conservation initiatives should be implemented based on more comprehensive, quantitative assessments of the multi-dimensional interactions between areas and species to further the effectiveness of PA networks.

Sustainable aquaculture in Canada: Lost in translation

Milewski I, Smith RE. Sustainable aquaculture in Canada: Lost in translation. Marine Policy [Internet]. 2019 ;107:103571. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X19301332?dgcid=raven_sd_search_email
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

Canada is a signatory to United Nations conventions on sustainable development and has entrenched sustainability goals in legislation and policies relating to natural resource sectors including aquaculture. Monitoring and measuring progress towards sustainable development requires the development of sustainability indicators (SI) that, when measured, indicate movement towards or away from a stated policy objective, as well as providing the public with a measure of government accountability. This paper examined the SI used by the Canadian government to assess the social, economic and environmental sustainability of aquaculture production in Canada, whether they adequately measure policy outcomes, and whether national-level SI indicators are appropriate to assessing sustainability at the community-level. The analysis reveals that the Canadian government has made virtually no progress towards translating sustainable aquaculture policy aspirations into measurable SI that evaluate policy outcomes. The mismatch between national policy goals and on-the-ground consequences are highlighted in a community case study of finfish aquaculture in Port Mouton Bay (Nova Scotia). Aquaculture SI and sustainability narratives are discussed in relation to emergent governance arrangements (certification programs) and an international development initiative, Blue Growth, for the world's oceans.

Ingestion of macroplastics by odontocetes of the Greek Seas, Eastern Mediterranean: Often deadly!

Alexiadou P, Foskolos I, Frantzis A. Ingestion of macroplastics by odontocetes of the Greek Seas, Eastern Mediterranean: Often deadly!. Marine Pollution Bulletin [Internet]. 2019 ;146:67 - 75. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025326X19304230?via%3Dihub
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Plastic pollution is an omnipresent problem that threatens marine animals through ingestion and entanglement. Marine mammals are no exception to this rule but their interaction with plastic remains understudied in the Mediterranean Sea. Here we highlight this problem by analyzing the stomach contents of 34 individuals from seven odontocete species stranded in Greece. Macroplastic (>5 mm) were found in the stomachs of nine individuals from four species (harbour porpoise Phocoena phocoena, Risso's dolphin Grampus griseus, Cuvier's beaked whale Ziphius cavirostrisand sperm whale Physeter macrocephalus) with the highest frequency of occurrence in sperm whales (60%). Gastric blockage from plastic was presumably lethal in three cases, with plastic bags being the most common finding (46%). Plastic ingestion is of particular conservation concern for the endangered Mediterranean sperm whales. A regular examination of stranded cetaceans with a standardised protocol is critical for allowing spatiotemporal comparisons within and across species.

Valuing Blue Carbon Changes in the Arctic Ocean

Armstrong CW, Foley NS, Slagstad D, Chierici M, Ellingsen I, Reigstad M. Valuing Blue Carbon Changes in the Arctic Ocean. Frontiers in Marine Science [Internet]. 2019 ;6. Available from: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2019.00331/full?utm_source=F-NTF&utm_medium=EMLX&utm_campaign=PRD_FEOPS_20170000_ARTICLE
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The ocean capacity to store carbon is crucial, and currently absorbs about 25% CO2 supply to the atmosphere. The ability to store carbon has an economic value, but such estimates are not common for ocean environments, and not yet estimated for the Arctic Ocean. With the severe climatic changes in the Arctic Ocean, impacting sea ice and potentially the vertical carbon transport mechanisms, a projection of future changes in Arctic Ocean carbon storage is also of interest. In order to value present and evolving carbon storage in the changing Arctic marine environment we combine an ocean model with an economic analysis. Placing a value on these changes helps articulate the importance of the carbon storage service to society. The standing stock and fluxes of organic and inorganic carbon from the atmosphere, rivers, shelves and through the gateways linking to lower latitudes, and to the deep of the Arctic Ocean are investigated using the physically chemically biologically coupled SINMOD model. To obtain indications of the effect of climate change, trajectories of two IPCC climate scenarios RCP 4.5, and RCP 8.5 from the Max Planck Institute were used for the period 2006–2099. The results show an increase in the net carbon storage in the Arctic Ocean in this time period to be 1.0 and 2.3% in the RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5 scenarios, respectively. Most of this increase is caused by an increased atmospheric CO2 uptake until 2070. The continued increase in inorganic carbon storage between 2070 and 2099 results from increased horizontal influx from lower latitude marine regions. First estimates of carbon storage values in the Arctic Ocean are calculated using the social cost of carbon (SCC) and carbon market values as two outer bounds from 2019 to 2099, based on the simulated scenarios. We find the Arctic Ocean will over the time period studied increase its storage of carbon to a value of between €27.6 billion and €1 trillion. This paper clearly neglects a multitude of different negative consequences of climate change in the Arctic, but points to the fact that there are also some positive counterbalancing effects.

Analysis of suspended microplastics in the Changjiang Estuary: Implications for riverine plastic load to the ocean

Zhao S, Wang T, Zhu L, Xu P, Wang X, Gao L, Li D. Analysis of suspended microplastics in the Changjiang Estuary: Implications for riverine plastic load to the ocean. Water Research [Internet]. 2019 ;161:560 - 569. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0043135419305305?dgcid=raven_sd_search_email
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

The role of rivers as a major transport pathway for all sizes of plastic debris into the ocean is widely recognized. Global modelling studies ranked the Changjiang River as the largest contributor of plastic waste to the marine environment, but these estimates were based on insufficient empirical data. To better understand the role of rivers in delivering terrestrial plastic debris to the ocean, the spatial and temporal patterns of microplastics (MP) in the Changjiang Estuary (CE) and the East China Sea (ECS) were studied based on surface water samples in February, May, and July 2017. A total of 3225 MP (60–5000 μm) were identified by Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry. MP abundance in July was higher than in February and May due to higher river discharge. Density stratification in CE significantly influenced the surface MP abundances. A temporal accumulation zone within the river-sea interface for plastics was indicated by stations with apparently higher abundances in the river plume. Fibers were the most common MP (>80%) over three months. Small MP (<1000 μm) composed 75.0% of the total plastics on average. The average mass of MP was 0.000033 g/particle, which was two orders of magnitude lower than the empirical mass in literature. Without considering tidal effects, we estimate 16–20 trillion MP particles, weighing 537.6–905.9 tons, entered the sea through the surface water layer of the Changjiang River in 2017. These findings of this study provide reliable information on MP waste in a large river, which should be considered in further studies for estimating the riverine plastic loads.

Setting expected timelines of fished population recovery for the adaptive management of a marine protected area network

Kaplan KA, Yamane L, Botsford LW, Baskett ML, Hastings A, Worden S, J. White W. Setting expected timelines of fished population recovery for the adaptive management of a marine protected area network. Ecological Applications [Internet]. 2019 :e01949. Available from: https://esajournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/eap.1949
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Adaptive management of marine protected areas (MPAs) requires developing methods to evaluate whether monitoring data indicate that they are performing as expected. Modeling the expected responses of targeted species to a MPA network, with a clear timeline for those expectations, can aid in the development of a monitoring program that efficiently evaluates expectations over appropriate time frames. Here we describe the expected trajectories in abundance and biomass following MPA implementation for populations of 19 nearshore fishery species in California. To capture the process of filling in the age structure truncated by fishing, we used age‐structured population models with stochastic larval recruitment to predict responses to MPA implementation. We implemented both demographically open (high larval immigration) and closed (high self‐recruitment) populations to model the range of possible trajectories as they depend on recruitment dynamics. From these simulations, we quantified the time scales over which anticipated increases in abundance and biomass inside MPAs would become statistically detectable. Predicted population biomass responses range from little change, for species with low fishing rates, to increasing by a factor of nearly seven, for species with high fishing rates before MPA establishment. Increases in biomass following MPA implementation are usually greater in both magnitude and statistical detectability than increases in abundance. For most species, increases in abundance would not begin to become detectable for at least ten years after implementation. Overall, these results inform potential indicator metrics (biomass), potential indicator species (those with a high fishing:natural mortality ratio), and time frame (>10 years) for MPA monitoring assessment as part of the adaptive management process.

A non-native habitat-former mitigates native habitat loss for endemic reef fishes

Barrett LT, Dempster T, Swearer SE. A non-native habitat-former mitigates native habitat loss for endemic reef fishes. Ecological Applications [Internet]. 2019 . Available from: https://esajournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/eap.1956
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $42.00
Type: Journal Article

Animals that select the best available habitats are most likely to succeed in degraded environments, but ecological change can create evolutionarily unfamiliar habitats that may be under‐ or over‐utilized by native fauna. In temperate coastal waters, eutrophication and grazing have driven a global decline in native seaweeds and facilitated the establishment of non‐native seaweeds that provide novel macrophyte habitat. We tested whether a non‐native kelp canopy (wakame Undaria pinnatifida) functions as a viable habitat or ecological trap for several endemic reef fishes on urchin‐grazed reefs in southern Australia. We assessed the willingness of fish to utilize native vs. wakame kelp canopy via a laboratory habitat choice experiment and by recording natural recruitment to specially constructed boulder reefs with manipulated kelp canopy. We also compared fish communities on natural reefs using a before‐after‐control‐impact survey of wakame patches, and to assess the quality of wakame habitat for resident fish, compared fitness metrics for fish collected from habitats with native vs. wakame kelp canopy. Endemic fishes did not distinguish between the native or wakame canopy but preferred both to barren reef habitats. On urchin‐grazed natural reefs, fish occurred in higher abundance and diversity where seasonal wakame canopy was present. Fitness metrics in fish collected from wakame patches were comparable to those in fish from adjacent native kelp patches. These findings indicate that the non‐native canopy provides a viable habitat for endemic fish and may play a role in sustaining native fauna populations in this degraded ecosystem. More broadly, we recommend that managers consider the role of non‐native habitats within the context of environmental change, as endemic fauna may benefit from non‐native habitat‐formers in areas where their native counterparts cannot persist.

Disintegration behaviour of bio-based plastics in coastal zone marine environments: A field experiment under natural conditions

Briassoulis D, Pikasi A, Briassoulis C, Mistriotis A. Disintegration behaviour of bio-based plastics in coastal zone marine environments: A field experiment under natural conditions. Science of The Total Environment [Internet]. In Press . Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S004896971932697X?dgcid=raven_sd_search_email
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $41.95
Type: Journal Article

The accumulation of plastic wastes in the marine environment represents a steadily increasing global environmental threat. The replacement of conventional plastics with bio-based biodegradable materials may contribute to alleviating the problem in the long run. This work studies the disintegration behaviour of three bio-based plastic materials, namely Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB), Polybutylene sebacate (PBSe), Polybutylene sebacate-co-terephthalate (PBSeT), in three different coastal zone marine environments under natural conditions. The three studied environments were: 1) the seashore zone which is periodically covered by the seawater due to waves or tide, called eulittoral or intertidal zone; 2) the water column zone of small depth (about 10 m), called pelagic zone; and 3) the interface zone between the water column and the seabed sediment at small depth (about 20 m), called sublittoral or benthic zone. The experiments took place in the Aegean Sea at the SW coast of Salamis Island. The results showed that disintegration, as an indicative measure of biodegradation, occurs in all three tested environments, even though the rate depends on the material, the habitat, and the prevailing during the testing period environmental conditions. The degrees of disintegration of all materials in the three environments exhibited significant differences: Benthic > Intertidal > Pelagic. The observed disintegration can be attributed to biodegradation since the negative reference Low-density Polyethylene (LLDPE) material did not disintegrate.

Protecting private properties from the sea: Australian policies and practice

Harvey N. Protecting private properties from the sea: Australian policies and practice. Marine Policy [Internet]. 2019 ;107:103566. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X1830753X?dgcid=raven_sd_search_email
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

The vulnerability of private coastal properties is a global issue which has arisen largely because of a lack of understanding of coastal processes. In some countries where government authorities have a long history of funding private property protection works the sustainability and ethics of policies have been questioned together with debate over public rights and the rights of property owners. In Australia, where coast protection is a responsibility of state governments there is a variation in policies and legislation relating to planning approvals for coast protection works in front of private properties. This paper examines the different Australian policies and uses examples from practice to illustrate these differences. The paper notes a wide variation in the ratio of public versus private funding which does not always match the relative proportion of benefit gained from protection works. The paper concludes that there is a complex pattern of individual state-based coastal policies, legislation and guidelines related to protection of private coastal properties. These have an underlying principle that protection works must be fully assessed in the context of effects on the adjacent coast and neighbouring properties. In reality, this requires a detailed understanding of coastal processes, particularly sediment movement, within broad sections of the coast referred to as sediment cells. Such an integrated approach has been introduced to some state-based Australian coastal legislation and strategies.

Predicting the exposure of coastal species to plastic pollution in a complex island archipelago

Critchell K, Hamann M, Wildermann N, Grech A. Predicting the exposure of coastal species to plastic pollution in a complex island archipelago. Environmental Pollution [Internet]. In Press . Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0269749119301484?dgcid=raven_sd_search_email
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

Plastic pollution in the marine environment is a pervasive and increasing threat to global biodiversity. Prioritising management actions that target marine plastic pollution require spatial information on the dispersal and settlement of plastics from both local and external sources. However, there is a mismatch between the scale of most plastic dispersal studies (regional, national and global) and the scale relevant to management action (local). We use a fine-resolution hydrodynamic model to predict the potential exposure of coastal habitats and species (mangroves, coral reefs and marine turtles) to plastic pollution at the local scale of a management region (the 1,700 km2 Whitsunday Islands, Queensland, Australia). We assessed the potential exposure of mangroves, coral reefs and marine turtles to plastics during the two dominant wind conditions of the region; the trade wind and monsoon wind seasons. We found that in the trade wind season (April to September) all habitats and species had lower exposure than during the monsoon wind season (October to March). In both wind seasons we found a small proportion of coral reef habitat and large area of turtle habitat were in high potential exposure categories. Unlike coral reefs or marine turtles, mangroves had consistent hotspots of high exposure across wind seasons. Local scale management requires data at fine resolution to capture the variability that occurs at this scale. The outputs of our study can inform the development of conservation resources and local scale management action.

A comparative study of fishery and environment laws in the south China sea: Utilizing existing laws to promote peace

Clark-Shen N, Hsiao A, Oei L, Rao M, Sun N-Y, Douglas A. A comparative study of fishery and environment laws in the south China sea: Utilizing existing laws to promote peace. Marine Policy [Internet]. In Press :103568. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X19303756?dgcid=raven_sd_search_email
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

There is general consensus that claimants to the South China Sea (SCS) should set aside territorial disputes and cooperate to preserve the natural resources of the sea. These resources are vital to millions of fishermen and consumers but are severely overexploited. Failure to prevent further exploitation or replenish stocks will exacerbate tensions in the SCS as countries compete for dwindling resources. Understanding how and where to start cooperating is a topic of much debate, and few ideas have gained enough traction for implementation. This report suggests that agreements can be built from existing commonalities in national laws and policies concerning fisheries and the marine environment. Utilizing these commonalities could help to build confidence by showing that despite disputes, there are in fact similarities and areas of alignment. This would not only build confidence but may serve as a less contentious route toward cooperation, because countries are agreeing - at a regional level - on criteria they already agree on at a national level. This concept is explored by looking at the fisheries and marine environmental laws and policies of China, Philippines, Vietnam, Malaysia and Indonesia.

Is human health sufficiently protected from chemicals discharged with treated ballast water from vessels worldwide? – A decadal perspective and risk assessment

Dock A, Linders J, David M, Gollasch S, David J. Is human health sufficiently protected from chemicals discharged with treated ballast water from vessels worldwide? – A decadal perspective and risk assessment. Chemosphere [Internet]. In Press . Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0045653519313426?dgcid=raven_sd_search_email
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $41.95
Type: Journal Article

Ballast water managements systems (BWMS) installed on vessels may use active substances to inactivate organisms. This paper provides new insights in the global issue of noxious disinfection by-products (DBP) discharge with ballast water, and the related risk assessment for human health. The GESAMP ballast water working group plays a role in the certification process of BWMS that make use of active substances evaluating potential negative effects. We analyzed all BWMS that passed GESAMP final approval over a decade until 2017 providing an overview of chemicals in the discharged ballast water generated by BWMS. We used these data to calculate the chemical load humans may be exposed to for two different commercial ports (Koper, Slovenia and Hamburg, Germany). None of the chemicals in this study reached levels of concern that would indicate a risk for humans after exposure to chemicals present in the discharged ballast water. Nevertheless, although this exposure only adds to a lesser degree to the overall exposure to disinfection by-products, some chemicals, such as tribromomethane, have carcinogenic properties. In case studies we show which chemicals have the largest contribution to the aggregated exposure of humans. We note that tribromomethane, despite its low bio-concentration factor (BCF), may accumulate in fat, when fish are continuously exposed to DBPs during low-level chlorination. Since this figure would give a higher value for the internal dose for tribromomethane from seafood consumption than the current BCF in the GISIS database, the calculated value may underestimate the contribution of tribromomethane, and possibly also other DBPs.

Managing coastal protection through multi-scale governance structures in Romania

Văidianu N, Tătui F, Ristea M, Stănică A. Managing coastal protection through multi-scale governance structures in Romania. Marine Policy [Internet]. In Press :103567. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X18304123?dgcid=raven_sd_search_email
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

The coastal zone offers many goods and services ranging from production to recreation and protection. During the last half century, human interventions on the Romanian Black Sea coast have abruptly changed the natural trends of coastal evolution, increasing erosion rates on many coastal sectors and transforming the natural landscape with major impact on coastal ecosystems. This required decision makers to develop effective coastal and marine conservation regulations and programs. This paper uses Evolutionary Governance Theory (EGT) as a conceptual framework to examine the currently emerging governance issues, due to the growing pressure from increasingly diverse human activities coupled with climate change impacts, that threaten the functional integrity of the coastal ecosystems. A proper evaluation and understanding of the policy framework helped us to identify the prerequisites for participative management. Results indicate that the legislation is sectorial, the competences are overlapping and the responsibilities are scattered. The analysis shows that policies related to governance of coastal and marine resources are not well synchronized and they signal an important gap in policy. Input from stakeholders helps us to understand some of the failures that are not present in the literature, since most of them occur at the local level.

Transforming Heritage Practice in the 21st Century: Shipwrecks and Sport Divers: Florida’s Programs in Participatory Preservation Underwater

Scott-Ireton DA, Moates JT. Transforming Heritage Practice in the 21st Century: Shipwrecks and Sport Divers: Florida’s Programs in Participatory Preservation Underwater. In: Jameson JH, Musteaţă S Cham: Springer International Publishing; 2019. pp. 161 - 171. Available from: https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-030-14327-5_12
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $29.95
Type: Book Chapter

Public efforts to support proper use and preservation of Florida’s historic shipwrecks began in earnest in the late 1980s. One of the most successful and popular programs developed by the state is the Underwater Archaeological Preserve system. As part of this process, state archaeologists begin by working with sport divers and local governments to establish the Preserve. From this point forward, archaeologists utilize the submerged sites to facilitate hands-on, non-disturbance survey and documentation trainings for these and other groups. Using the same framework, the Florida Public Archaeology Network continues to engage the public’s interest in Florida’s shipwrecks and other submerged cultural heritage sites. This chapter describes the Submerged Sites Education and Archaeological Stewardship (SSEAS) program and the Heritage Awareness Diving Seminar (HADS), and how these programs are intended to encourage divers to become active in monitoring wreck sites and making their own discoveries, in the process producing information instead of simply consuming information. While initial results have been encouraging, they also provide a lesson for orienting collaborative programs to the needs of the audience, rather than only to the needs of archaeologists.

No lines in the sand: Impacts of intense mechanized maintenance regimes on sandy beach ecosystems span the intertidal zone on urban coasts

Schooler NK, Dugan JE, Hubbard DM. No lines in the sand: Impacts of intense mechanized maintenance regimes on sandy beach ecosystems span the intertidal zone on urban coasts. Ecological Indicators [Internet]. 2019 ;106:105457. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1470160X1930442X
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

As coastal population growth accelerates, intensive management practices increasingly alter urban shorelines, creating major conservation challenges. To evaluate key ecological impacts and identify indicators of coastal urbanization, we compared intertidal macroinvertebrate communities between urban beaches with intense maintenance regimes (sediment filling and grooming) and reference beaches lacking such maintenance in densely populated southern California. On urban beaches, intertidal communities were highly impacted with significantly reduced species richness, abundance, and biomass (effect sizes: 79%, 49%, 30%, respectively). Urban impacts affected macroinvertebrates across all intertidal zones, with greatest effects on upper intertidal wrack-associated taxa. On urban beaches altered intertidal communities were remarkably homogeneous across littoral cells in a biogeographically complex region. Functional diversity comparisons suggested degraded ecological functioning on urban beaches. No taxa flourished on urban beaches, but we identified several vulnerable indicator taxa. Our results suggest intense maintenance regimes on urban coasts are negatively impacting sandy beach ecosystems on a landscape scale. Beaches not subject to intense mechanized maintenance, can support high biodiversity, even near major urban centers.

Developing a Social–Ecological–Environmental System Framework to Address Climate Change Impacts in the North Pacific

Bograd SJ, Kang S, Di Lorenzo E, Horii T, Katugin ON, King JR, Lobanov VB, Makino M, Na G, R. Perry I, et al. Developing a Social–Ecological–Environmental System Framework to Address Climate Change Impacts in the North Pacific. Frontiers in Marine Science [Internet]. 2019 ;6. Available from: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2019.00333/full?utm_source=F-NTF&utm_medium=EMLX&utm_campaign=PRD_FEOPS_20170000_ARTICLE
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

“Forecasting and Understanding Trends, Uncertainty and Responses of North Pacific Marine Ecosystems” (FUTURE) is the flagship integrative Scientific Program undertaken by the member nations and affiliates of the North Pacific Marine Science Organization (PICES). A principal goal of FUTURE is to develop a framework for investigating interactions across disciplinary dimensions in order to most effectively understand large-scale ecosystem changes and resulting impacts on coastal communities. These interactions are complex, often nonlinear, occur across a range of spatial and temporal scales, and can complicate management approaches to shared and trans-boundary problems. Here, we present a Social–Ecological–Environmental Systems (SEES) framework to coordinate and integrate marine science within PICES. We demonstrate the application of this framework by applying it to four “crisis” case studies: (a) species alternation in the western North Pacific; (b) ecosystem impacts of an extreme heat wave in the eastern North Pacific; (c) jellyfish blooms in the western North Pacific; and (d) Pacific basin-scale warming and species distributional shifts. Our approach fosters a common transdisciplinary language and knowledge base across diverse expertise, providing the basis for developing better integrated end-to-end models. PICES provides the structure required to address these and other multi-national, inter-disciplinary issues we face in the North Pacific. An effective and comprehensive SEES approach is broadly applicable to understanding and maintaining resilient marine ecosystems within a changing climate.

Estimating coastal and marine habitat values by combining multi-criteria methods with choice experiments

Pascoe S, Doshi A, Kovac M, Austin A. Estimating coastal and marine habitat values by combining multi-criteria methods with choice experiments. Ecosystem Services [Internet]. 2019 ;38:100951. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2212041618304431?dgcid=raven_sd_search_email
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $31.50
Type: Journal Article

The coastal and marine environment provides a wide range of ecosystem services, many of which may be impacted through coastal management. Incorporating these values into cost-benefit analysis to support decision making is hampered by the lack of existing appropriate measures. While studies can be undertaken by these agencies to collect the appropriate values, the number of different habitats that may need to be considered is greater than what could reasonably be included in traditional economic approaches. In this paper, we propose combining of a multi-criteria method, namely the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP), with choice experiments to develop estimates for a wide range of coastal and marine habitat values that can be used by local planners and coastal managers. We apply the approach to the coastal regions in New South Wales (NSW), Australia. Coastal residents were initially asked to express their preferences for protecting different coastal and marine habitats using AHP, from which a relative index of utility was derived. A choice experiment was also implemented, involving a hypothetical new coastal reserve in their area protecting different combinations of habitats and funded through an increase in their local council rates. We found that nearly 90 per cent of NSW coastal residents were willing to pay to support coastal protection. Relative values derived from the AHP were used to extrapolate the choice experiment results to provide estimates of non-market values for a wide range of coastal and marine habitats.

Frequently Asked Questions: Marine Aquaculture in California and the U.S.

Nelson M, Schubel JR, Thompson K. Frequently Asked Questions: Marine Aquaculture in California and the U.S. Seafood for the Future/Aquarium of the Pacific; 2019. Available from: http://www.aquariumofpacific.org/seafoodfuture
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Report

This is a living document responding to common questions about marine aquaculture. The download featured on this page may not feature the most recent changes. The document in its most recent stage will exist at http://www.aquariumofpacific.org/seafoodfuture.

Climate impacts on the ocean are making the Sustainable Development Goals a moving target travelling away from us

Singh GG, Hilmi N, Bernhardt JR, Montemayor AMCisnero, Cashion M, Ota Y, Acar S, Brown JM, Cottrell R, Djoundourian S, et al. Climate impacts on the ocean are making the Sustainable Development Goals a moving target travelling away from us Ban N. People and Nature [Internet]. 2019 . Available from: https://besjournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/pan3.26
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article
  1. Climate change is impacting marine ecosystems and their goods and services in diverse ways, which can directly hinder our ability to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), set out under the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.
  2. Through expert elicitation and a literature review, we find that most climate change effects have a wide variety of negative consequences across marine ecosystem services, though most studies have highlighted impacts from warming and consequences of marine species.
  3. Climate change is expected to negatively influence marine ecosystem services through global stressors—such as ocean warming and acidification—but also by amplifying local and regional stressors such as freshwater runoff and pollution load.
  4. Experts indicated that all SDGs would be overwhelmingly negatively affected by these climate impacts on marine ecosystem services, with eliminating hunger being among the most directly negatively affected SDG.
  5. Despite these challenges, the SDGs aiming to transform our consumption and production practices and develop clean energy systems are found to be least affected by marine climate impacts. These findings represent a strategic point of entry for countries to achieve sustainable development, given that these two goals are relatively robust to climate impacts and that they are important pre‐requisite for other SDGs.
  6. Our results suggest that climate change impacts on marine ecosystems are set to make the SDGs a moving target travelling away from us. Effective and urgent action towards sustainable development, including mitigating and adapting to climate impacts on marine systems are important to achieve the SDGs, but the longer this action stalls the more distant these goals will become.

Low connectivity compromises the conservation of reef fishes by marine protected areas in the tropical South Atlantic

Endo CAkemi Kaji, Gherardi DFrancisco, Pezzi LPonzi, Lima LNascimento. Low connectivity compromises the conservation of reef fishes by marine protected areas in the tropical South Atlantic. Scientific Reports [Internet]. 2019 ;9(1). Available from: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-45042-0
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The total spatial coverage of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) within the Brazilian Economic Exclusive Zone (EEZ) has recently achieved the quantitative requirement of the Aichii Biodiversity Target 11. However, the distribution of MPAs in the Brazilian EEZ is still unbalanced regarding the proportion of protected ecosystems, protection goals and management types. Moreover, the demographic connectivity between these MPAs and their effectiveness regarding the maintenance of biodiversity are still not comprehensively understood. An individual-based modeling scheme coupled with a regional hydrodynamic model of the ocean is used to determine the demographic connectivity of reef fishes based on the widespread genus Sparisoma found in the oceanic islands and on the Brazilian continental shelf between 10° N and 23° S. Model results indicate that MPAs are highly isolated due to extremely low demographic connectivity. Consequently, low connectivity and the long distances separating MPAs contribute to their isolation. Therefore, the current MPA design falls short of its goal of maintaining the demographic connectivity of Sparisoma populations living within these areas. In an extreme scenario in which the MPAs rely solely on protected populations for recruits, it is unlikely that they will be able to effectively contribute to the resilience of these populations or other reef fish species sharing the same dispersal abilities. Results also show that recruitment occurs elsewhere along the continental shelf indicating that the protection of areas larger than the current MPAs would enhance the network, maintain connectivity and contribute to the conservation of reef fishes.

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