Literature Library

Currently indexing 9736 titles

Agriculture and Ecosystem Resilience in Sub Saharan Africa- Climate Change Adaptation Through Aquaculture: Ecological Considerations and Regulatory Requirements for Tropical Africa

Oyebola OOlusegun, Olatunde OMartha. Agriculture and Ecosystem Resilience in Sub Saharan Africa- Climate Change Adaptation Through Aquaculture: Ecological Considerations and Regulatory Requirements for Tropical Africa. In: Bamutaze Y, Kyamanywa S, Singh BRam, Nabanoga G, Lal R Cham: Springer International Publishing; 2019. pp. 435 - 472. Available from: https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-030-12974-3_20
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $29.95
Type: Book Chapter

Aquaculture has been identified to have potentials for adapting climate impacts, and it is being leveraged upon in some developing tropical African countries for food production, employment, food security and poverty eradication. However, it is also vulnerable to climate impacts, linked with certain ecological challenges and competition from anthropogenic factors. This chapter utilized secondary and primary data from various sources to address review questions bordering on the vulnerability of tropical Africa to impact of climate change, potentials of utilizing aquaculture for enhanced climate impact adaptation and food security, aquaculture-related ecological issues and the required management, policy and regulatory actions for its sustainable utilization in this regard. The study revealed that tropical Africa is vulnerable to climate change; aquaculture has viable elements for climate impact adaptation and food security but could contribute to environmental challenges. Aquaculture however has capacity to adjust to the environmental claims, achievable through adequate monitoring, control and surveillance for adherence to ecological considerations. There is the need to specifically formulate policies and provide a strong institutional framework to cater for the nuances of aquaculture, climate impact adaptation and food security. And to ensure for sustenance, it is necessary to strengthen policies and management frameworks with human and financial capacity, within the implementing agencies at local, national and regional levels in tropical Africa.

Coral Reefs of the WorldMesophotic Coral EcosystemsMesophotic Coral Ecosystems: Introduction and Overview

Pyle RL, Copus JM. Coral Reefs of the WorldMesophotic Coral EcosystemsMesophotic Coral Ecosystems: Introduction and Overview. In: Loya Y, Puglise KA, Bridge TCL Vol. 12. Cham: Springer International Publishing; 2019. pp. 3 - 27. Available from: https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-92735-0_1
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $29.95
Type: Book Chapter

Although the existence of zooxanthellate corals in mesophotic coral ecosystems (MCEs; light-dependent coral ecosystems from 30 to 150 m in depth) has been known since the nineteenth century and focused scientific exploration of MCEs began over 50 years ago, more than 70% of all research on MCEs has been published only within the past seven years. MCEs represent approximately 80% of potential coral reef habitat worldwide, yet very little is known about them in comparison to shallow reefs. Many MCE species new to science have been discovered in the past decade, and many more await discovery. The term MCEs has been widely adopted by the scientific community since its 2008 inception; however, there is considerable inconsistency in how it is subdivided into “upper” and “lower” (and sometimes “middle”) zones. Moreover, doing so may lead to artificial boundaries when habitats and ecological communities at different depth zones may blend together. Growing evidence suggests that MCEs harbor proportionally more geographically endemic species than their shallow-water counterparts, and initial indications are that major biogeographic patterns described for shallow reef organisms may not apply to MCEs. Although MCEs may serve as refugia for some shallow species, they are increasingly recognized as unique ecosystems, important in their own right. Future research on MCEs should aim to address gaps in our understanding of the basic physical and biological characteristics of MCEs including geography, taxonomic composition, depth distribution, ecology, physiology, and connectivity. Improving knowledge of MCEs would benefit from combining different technologies to leverage the strengths of each.

An updated orientation to marine conservation funding flows

Berger MF, Caruso V, Peterson E. An updated orientation to marine conservation funding flows. Marine Policy [Internet]. In Press :103497. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X18304196
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

Funding from official development assistance (ODA) and private foundationsaccount for key contributions to marine conservation funding worldwide. Total funding from these two sources increased from approximately USD 700 million per year during 2010–2014 to USD 769 million in 2015. During this time period, private foundation contributions with a marine conservation purpose eclipsed corresponding ODA contributions for the first time in 2015. However, previous analyses have overlooked two other important funding sources: individualcontributions to non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and funding through public expenditures (including management costs for fisheries and marine protected areas). The purpose of this study is to better understand the flow of funding to marine conservation globally by tracking trends in ODA and foundation funding and by incorporating approximations for individual contributions to NGOsand public expenditures. Given the difficulty of measuring the latter two sources, proxies are provided here for practical, rather than precise, purposes to illustratethat funding levels are higher than current estimates suggest. Improving data availability, transparency, and coding across all sectors would enable improved tracking and potentially help funders identify both gaps and priorities for investment.

Explaining success in community based mangrove management: Four coastal communities along the Andaman Sea, Thailand

Kongkeaw C, Kittitornkool J, Vandergeest P, Kittiwatanawong K. Explaining success in community based mangrove management: Four coastal communities along the Andaman Sea, Thailand. Ocean & Coastal Management [Internet]. 2019 ;178:104822. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0964569118307403
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

Community-based mangrove management (CBMM) in Thailand has been uniquely successful, so that efforts to promote CBMM elsewhere can potentially learn from the Thai experience. This qualitative research identifies factors contributing to success of community-based mangrove management in four coastal communities along the Andaman Sea during 1980–2017. The emergence and consolidation of community-mangrove management took place in distinct phases including collective action with support by NGOs to address a degradation crises; a shift to cooperation with government; and the stabilization and enhancement of sustainable management. Factors explaining the emergence of successful community mangrove management include those internal to the community, such as leadership, occupational change, experience, and capacity to organize into groups; and those that are external to the community including NGO support in the initial phases, and increasing government support and recognition in subsequent phases. The factors that help explain success have changed over time, indicating the flexibility in what might facilitate successful CBMM elsewhere.

Negotiating coastal infrastructures: An evolutionary governance theory (EGT) approach to Chinese high-modernist development along the Indian Ocean

Alff H. Negotiating coastal infrastructures: An evolutionary governance theory (EGT) approach to Chinese high-modernist development along the Indian Ocean. Marine Policy [Internet]. In Press :103545. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X18303348
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

What is known today as the Maritime Silk Road Initiative (MSRI) was first proposed in fall 2013 by China’s President Xi Jinping in a keynote speech to the Indonesian parliament in Jakarta and has since drawn immense geopolitical and economic attention. The stated goal of the large-scale initiative is to strengthen maritime connectivity between China, Asia, Africa and Europe by infrastructural development, particularly of ports, oil transshipment terminals and Special Economic Zones. Based on the initial review of policy documents and widely published strategic visions of the Maritime Silk Road, the paper aims to explore, on the one hand, the conceptual foundations and policy mechanisms behind China’s large-scale development projects in coastal areas along the Indian Ocean. On the other, the paper by drawing on an empirical example from Sri Lanka seeks to take an evolutionary governance theory (EGT) perspective towards on-the-ground implementation of these policies. By doing so, the study highlights the impact of interconnected formal and informal institutions and discourses, in transforming Chinese engagement. The contribution therefore seeks to reflect upon particular Chinese patterns of high-modernist developmental governance in coastal places and their local social and political negotiation and materialisation.

Identification, Assessment and Governance of Other Effective Area Based Conservation Measures in the Marine Fishery Sector: A Background Document

Garcia SM, Rice J, Friedman K, Himes-Cornell A. Identification, Assessment and Governance of Other Effective Area Based Conservation Measures in the Marine Fishery Sector: A Background Document.; 2019. Available from: http://ebcd.org/other-effective-area-based-conservation-measures-oecms-a-challenge-and-an-opportunity-for-the-marine-capture-fishery-sector/
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Report

This document was prepared to provide background information to facilitate the work of the Expert Meeting on OECMs in the Marine Fishery Sector organized by FAO, SCBD and IUCN-CEM-FEG , 7-10 May 2019 in Rome.  It provides a rationale for the need of a specific guidance for the identification and use of OECMs in the marine fishery sector and the relations of such guidance with the Ecosystem Approach to Fisheries. Grounded in the CBD COP Decision 14/8 of November 2018, the document provides a comprehensive set of comments and considerations  on: (i) The OECM definition, guiding principles (on the roles of OECMs and their governance), and criteria for identification; (ii) Key concepts, cross-cutting issues and their implications in marine capture fisheries; (iii) the process of scientific identification of OECMs; (iv) Their management, monitoring and performance evaluation as well as auditing; (v) the eventual revision process; and (vi) the related governance issues.

How Does the Diversity of Divers Affect the Design of Citizen Science Projects?

Hermoso MI, Martin VY, Stotz W, Gelcich S, Thiel M. How Does the Diversity of Divers Affect the Design of Citizen Science Projects?. Frontiers in Marine Science [Internet]. 2019 ;6. Available from: https://www.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fmars.2019.00239/full
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Divers have widely participated in citizen science (CS) projects and are one of the main groups of marine citizen scientists. However, there is little knowledge about profiles of, and incentives for potential divers to join CS projects. To date, most studies have focused on the SCUBA diving industry; nevertheless, there is a diversity of divers, not all using SCUBA, who engage in different activities during their dives. Differences in diver profiles could affect their willingness and ability to contribute to CS. In this study, we compare the diving profile, interests, preferences and motivations to participate in CS of five diver types (artisanal fishermen, recreational divers, instructors, scientific divers, and others). All divers have strong interests in participating in CS projects, with no major differences among diver types. In general, they are interested in a wide variety of themes related to CS but they prefer simple sampling protocols. Divers are motivated to participate in CS to learn about the sea and contribute to science. Some important differences among diver types were found, with artisanal fishermen having significantly more dive experience than other diver types, but less free time during their dives and limited access to some communication channels and technologies. These characteristics make them ideal partners to contribute their local ecological knowledge (LEK) to local CS projects. In contrast, recreational divers have the least experience but most free time during their dives and good access to cameras and communications channels, making them suitable partners for large-scale CS projects that do not require a high level of species knowledge. Instructors and scientific divers are well-placed to coordinate and supervise CS activities. The results confirm that divers are not all alike and specific considerations have to be taken into account to improve the contribution of each diver type to CS. The findings provide essential information for the design of different types of CS projects. By considering the relevant incentives and opportunities for diverse diver groups, marine CS projects will make efficient gains in volunteer recruitment, retention, and collaborative generation of knowledge about the marine environment.

Public attitudes towards plastics

Dilkes-Hoffman LSarena, Pratt S, Laycock B, Ashworth P, Lant PAndrew. Public attitudes towards plastics. Resources, Conservation and Recycling [Internet]. 2019 ;147:227 - 235. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0921344919302101
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

Understanding and engaging the public is key for ensuring the success of government and industry initiatives aimed at addressing the problem of plastic waste. However, there has been little focus on documenting the general public’s attitudes towards plastics. This study examines public beliefs and attitudes towards plastics in Australia and provides insight on a global level. The research was conducted using an online survey of a nationally representative sample (2518 respondents). Overall, the survey results indicate that the public view plastics as a serious environmental issue. Plastic in the ocean had the highest mean rating for seriousness out of nine environmental issues, followed by two other issues relating to plastic waste production and disposal. Whilst there was an association of plastics with food packaging and convenience, there was more of a negative association with the use of plastic overall. Eighty percent of respondents indicated a desire to reduce plastic use and the majority of respondents believe that paper and glass are more environmentally friendly packaging materials than plastics. However, the results showed that many respondents do not translate their aspiration to reduce plastic use into action. Overall, while a majority of the Australian public are concerned about plastics as an environmental issue, they place the bulk of the responsibility for reducing the use of disposable plastic on industry and government.

Society-based solutions to coral reef threats in french pacific territories

Bambridge T, Chlous F, D’Arcy P, Claudet J, Pascal N, Reynaud S, Rodolfo-Metalpa R, Tambutté S, Thomassin A, Virto LRecuero. Society-based solutions to coral reef threats in french pacific territories. Regional Studies in Marine Science [Internet]. 2019 ;29:100667. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2352485518307023
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $31.50
Type: Journal Article

This article reviews the state of coral reefs in French Pacific territories in the context of global change (especially threats linked to climate change). We first outline the specific local characteristics, vulnerabilities, and threats faced by the coral reefs of New Caledonia, French Polynesia and Wallis and Futuna. We also emphasize local and other human communities’ economic and cultural reliance on coral reefs. Secondly, we discuss the natural and anthropogenic threats facing coral reefs in French Pacific territories, and current ecological responses such as mitigation and adaptation strategies. We conclude by proposing socio-economic solutions for the Pacific region across varying scales, with a special focus on enforcement measures and socio-political issues.

An evaluation of the Fishing For Litter (FFL) scheme in the UK in terms of attitudes, behavior, barriers and opportunities

Wyles KJ, Pahl S, Carroll L, Thompson RC. An evaluation of the Fishing For Litter (FFL) scheme in the UK in terms of attitudes, behavior, barriers and opportunities. Marine Pollution Bulletin [Internet]. 2019 ;144:48 - 60. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025326X19302966
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Marine litter is a global, persistent, and increasing threat to the oceans, and numerous initiatives aim to address this challenge. Fishing For Litter (FFL) is a voluntary clean-up scheme, where litter is collected as part of routine fishing operations. We surveyed fishers (n = 97) and stakeholders (n = 22) in the UK to investigate perceptions of FFL, its strengths and weaknesses, and potential co-benefits of the scheme. Fishers reported being aware of and concerned about the negative impacts of litter. Overall, FFL was evaluated very positively (7.85/10). In addition, FFL fishers reported less environmentally harmful waste managementbehaviors both out at sea and in other contexts than did non-FFL fishers. Fishers and stakeholders listed strengths and weaknesses of the scheme and made suggestions for future changes. As well as directly helping to remove litter, this paper demonstrates that clean-up schemes can make a contribution to addressing the underlying causes of marine pollution.

Cascaded deep network systems with linked ensemble components for underwater fish detection in the wild

Labao AB, Naval PC. Cascaded deep network systems with linked ensemble components for underwater fish detection in the wild. Ecological Informatics [Internet]. 2019 . Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1574954118303078
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

We propose a fish detection system based on deep network architectures to robustly detect and count fish objects under a variety of benthic background and illumination conditions. The algorithm consists of an ensemble of Region-based Convolutional Neural Networks that are linked in a cascade structure by Long Short-Term Memory networks. The proposed network is efficiently trained as all components are jointly trained by backpropagation. We train and test our system for a dataset of 18 videos taken in the wild. In our dataset, there are around 20 to 100 fish objects per frame with many fish objects having small pixel areas (less than 900 square pixels). From a series of experiments and ablation tests, the proposed system preserves detection accuracy despite multi-scale distortions, cropping and varying background environments. We present analysis that shows how object localization accuracy is increased by an automatic correction mechanism in the deep network's cascaded ensemble structure. The correction mechanism rectifies any errors in the predictions as information progresses through the network cascade. Our findings in this experiment regarding ensemble system architectures can be generalized to other object detection applications.

Governance mapping: A framework for assessing the adaptive capacity of marine resource governance to environmental change

Dutra LXC, Sporne I, Haward M, Aswani S, Cochrane KL, Frusher S, Gasalla M, Gianesella SMF, Grant T, Hobday AJ, et al. Governance mapping: A framework for assessing the adaptive capacity of marine resource governance to environmental change. Marine Policy [Internet]. In Press . Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X18301398
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

Marine social-ecological systems are influenced by the way humans interact with their environment, and external forces, which change and re-shape the environment. In many regions, exploitation of marine resources and climate change are two of the primary drivers shifting the abundance and distribution of marine living resources, with negative effects on marine-dependent communities. Governance systems determine ‘who’ makes decisions, ‘what’ are their powers and responsibilities, and ‘how’ they are exercised. Understanding the connections between the actors comprising governance systems and influences between governance and the environment is therefore critical to support successful transitions to novel forms of governance required to deal with environmental changes. The paper provides an analytical framework with a practical example from Vanuatu, for mapping and assessment of the governance system providing for management of coral reef fish resources. The framework enables a rapid analysis of governance systems to identify factors that can encourage, or hinder, the adaptation of communities to changes in abundance or availability of marine resources.

How quick was marine recovery after the end-Triassic mass extinction and what role did anoxia play?

Atkinson JW, Wignall PB. How quick was marine recovery after the end-Triassic mass extinction and what role did anoxia play?. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology [Internet]. 2019 ;528:99 - 119. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0031018219302330
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $37.95
Type: Journal Article

Oxygen restricted conditions were widespread in European shelf seas after the end-Triassic mass extinction event and they are reported to have hindered the recovery of marine benthos. Here we reconstruct the redox history of the Early Jurassic Blue Lias Formation of southwest Britain using pyrite framboid size analysis and compare this with the recovery of bivalves based on field and museum collections. Results suggest widespread dysoxia punctuated by periods of anoxia in the region, with the latter developing frequently in deeper water settings. Despite these harsh conditions, initial benthic recovery occurred rapidly in the British Jurassic, especially in shallowest settings, and shows no relationship with the intensity of dysoxia. A stable diversity was reached by the first recognised ammonite zone after the end-Triassic mass extinction. This contrasts with the deeper-water, more oxygen-poor sections where the diversity increase was still continuing in the earliest Sinemurian Stage, considerably longer than previously reported. Similar recovery rates are seen amongst other groups (brachiopods and ammonites). Oxygen-poor conditions have been suggested to delay recovery after the Permo-Triassic mass extinction, but this is not the case after the end-Triassic crisis. We suggest that this was because the European dysoxia was only a regional phenomenon and there were plenty of well-ventilated regions available to allow an untrammelled bounce back.

Current frontiers and recommendations for the study of microplastics in seafood

Dehaut A, Hermabessiere L, Duflos G. Current frontiers and recommendations for the study of microplastics in seafood. TrAC Trends in Analytical Chemistry [Internet]. In Press . Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0165993618305089
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

For seventy years, mass plastic production and waste mismanagement have resulted in huge pollution of the environment, including the marine environment. The first mention of seafood contaminated by microplastics was recorded in the seventies, and to date numerous studies have been carried out on shellfish, fish and crustaceans. Based on an ad hoc corpus, the current review aims to report on the numerous practices and methodologies described so far. By examining multiple aspects including problems related to the definition of the term microplastic, contamination at the laboratory scale, sampling and isolation, and quantification and identification, the aim was to point out current limitations and the needs to improve and harmonise practices for future studies on microplastics in seafood. A final part is devoted to the minimum information for publication of microplastics studies (MIMS). Based on the aspects discussed, MIMS act as a starting point for harmonisation of analyses.

How people value different ecosystems within the Great Barrier Reef

Marshall NA, Dunstan P, Pert P, Thiault L. How people value different ecosystems within the Great Barrier Reef. Journal of Environmental Management [Internet]. 2019 ;243:39 - 44. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S030147971930622X
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $41.95
Type: Journal Article

Natural ecosystems hold great place within the hearts and lives of people, particularly those within which people live and work. However, whether people equally value natural ecosystems that they regularly frequent is effectively unknown. Such knowledge would greatly assist natural resource managers to better understand what they are protecting, why and for whom. In this paper we look at the different values that people hold for different ecosystems within the Great Barrier Reef (GBR). We test the relationship between eight different cultural values (using ecosystem services framing), and the use of seven different ecosystems (beaches, creeks and estuaries, islands and cays, inshore reefs, mid-shelf and outer reefs, open water, and shipwrecks) from face-to-face surveys of 1934 residents living within the GBR. We also look at whether the relationships that people have with each ecosystem inspires them to; (i) do more to help protect the GBR, (ii) learn more about the GBR, and (iii) feel personally affected if the health of the GBR declines. Results suggest that there are common reasons why all ecosystems are valued. All seven ecosystems were valued because they provide identity, quality of life and well-being, and inspired people to do more to help protect the GBR. Many were valued for their desirable and active way of life, learning about the environment through scientific discoveries, and learning about the condition of the GBR. However, some ecosystems were valued for special reasons. People that used beaches tended to have more pride in the World Heritage Area status of the GBR and appreciated the aesthetics of the GBR. People that used the mid-shelf and open-water areas were more likely to value biodiversity and aesthetics qualities. People that used inshore reefs were more likely to value economic benefits from the GBR. All residents said that they would be personally affected if the health of the GBR declined, except for those that used beaches, creeks and estuaries. Levels of concern for each of the ecosystems within the GBR varied, where people were more concerned about inshore areas than they were about coral reef condition. Specifically, people were most concerned about the level of rubbish on the beaches in their region and least about mangroves. These results suggest that, even though the GBR is valued in its entirety for many reasons, the GBR is not perceived as an entire ecosystem, but that people have different relationships within it. We discuss how environmental sustainability might be optimised through understanding and incentivising the multi-functionality of landscapes.

Linking management planning for coastal wetlands to potential future wave attenuation under a range of relative sea-level rise scenarios

Hijuelos ACommagere, Dijkstra JT, Carruthers TJB, Heynert K, Reed DJ, van Wesenbeeck BK. Linking management planning for coastal wetlands to potential future wave attenuation under a range of relative sea-level rise scenarios Chapman MGeraldine. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2019 ;14(5):e0216695. Available from: https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0216695
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Understanding changes in wave attenuation by emergent vegetation as wetlands degrade or accrete over time is crucial for incorporation of wetlands into holistic coastal risk management. Linked SLAMM and XBeach models were used to investigate potential future changes in wave attenuation over a 50-year period in a degrading, subtropical wetland and a prograding, temperate wetland. These contrasting systems also have differing management contexts and were contrasted to demonstrate how the linked models can provide management-relevant insights. Morphological development of wetlands for different scenarios of sea-level rise and accretion was simulated with SLAMM and then coupled with different vegetation characteristics to predict the influence on future wave attenuation using XBeach. The geomorphological context, subsidence, and accretion resulted in large predicted reductions in the extent of vegetated land (e.g., wetland) and changes in wave height reduction potential across the wetland. These were exacerbated by increases in sea-level from +0.217 m to +0.386 m over a 50-year period, especially at the lowest accretion rates in the degrading wetland. Mangrove vegetation increased wave attenuation within the degrading, subtropical, saline wetland, while grazing reduced wave attenuation in the temperate, prograding wetland. Coastal management decisions and actions, related to coastal vegetation type and structure, have the potential to change future wave attenuation at a spatial scale relevant to coastal protection planning. Therefore, a coastal management approach that includes disaster risk reduction, biodiversity, and climate change, can be informed by coastal modeling tools, such as those demonstrated here for two contrasting case studies.

Large-scale coral reef rehabilitation after blast fishing in Indonesia

Williams SL, Sur C, Janetski N, Hollarsmith JA, Rapi S, Barron L, Heatwole SJ, Yusuf AM, Yusuf S, Jompa J, et al. Large-scale coral reef rehabilitation after blast fishing in Indonesia. Restoration Ecology [Internet]. 2019 ;27(2):447 - 456. Available from: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/rec.12866
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The severely degraded condition of many coral reefs worldwide calls for active interventions to rehabilitate their physical and biological structure and function, in addition to effective management of fisheries and no‐take reserves. Rehabilitation efforts to stabilize reef substratum sufficiently to support coral growth have been limited in size. We documented a large coral reef rehabilitation in Indonesia aiming to restore ecosystem functions by increasing live coral cover on a reef severely damaged by blast fishing and coral mining. The project deployed small, modular, open structures to stabilize rubble and to support transplanted coral fragments. Between 2013 to 2015, approximately 11,000 structures covering 7,000 m2 were deployed over 2 ha of a reef at a cost of US$174,000. Live coral cover on the structures increased from less than 10% initially to greater than 60% depending on depth, deployment date and location, and disturbances. The mean live coral cover in the rehabilitation area in October 2017 was higher than reported for reefs in many other areas in the Coral Triangle, including marine protected areas, but lower than in the no‐take reference reef. At least 42 coral species were observed growing on the structures. Surprisingly, during the massive coral bleaching in other regions during the 2014–2016 El Niño–Southern Oscillation event, bleaching in the rehabilitation area was less than 5% cover despite warm water (≥30°C). This project demonstrates that coral rehabilitation is achievable over large scales where coral reefs have been severely damaged and are under continuous anthropogenic disturbances in warming waters.

A Systematic Review of the Socioeconomic Factors that Influence How Marine Protected Areas Impact on Ecosystems and Livelihoods

Mizrahi M’ira, Diedrich A, Weeks R, Pressey RL. A Systematic Review of the Socioeconomic Factors that Influence How Marine Protected Areas Impact on Ecosystems and Livelihoods. Society & Natural Resources [Internet]. 2019 ;32(1):4 - 20. Available from: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/08941920.2018.1489568
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Marine protected areas (MPAs) are among the most widely accepted methods of marine management. MPAs are not, however, always placed such that they can maximize impact on conservation and livelihoods. Current MPA guidelines fall short in focusing primarily on biophysical criteria, overlooking interrelated socioeconomic factors. We identified 32 socioeconomic factors that influence whether MPA placement has an impact on biodiversity and/or livelihoods and weighted the quality of evidence using a novel “Evidence for Impact” Score. Results suggest that stakeholder engagement, poverty, population density, and strong leadership have most potential to positively impact biodiversity and/or livelihoods, but the direction of impact (i.e., positive or negative) can be context-dependent. We found a generally poor evidence base for impact evaluation of socioeconomic factors: though some factors were highly cited, few studies actually evaluate impact. Results indicate the need for a more interdisciplinary approach to MPA placement and more empirical studies that assess impact.

Minimizing wildlife impacts for offshore wind energy development: Winning tradeoffs for seabirds in space and cetaceans in time

Best BD, Halpin PN. Minimizing wildlife impacts for offshore wind energy development: Winning tradeoffs for seabirds in space and cetaceans in time Yue B-S. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2019 ;14(5):e0215722. Available from: https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0215722
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Although offshore wind energy development (OWED) offers a much-needed renewable energy alternative to fossil fuels, holistic and effective methods for evaluating environmental impacts on wildlife in both space and time have been lacking. The lengthy environmental compliance process, estimated to incur a 7–10 year permitting timeline [1], has been identified as a significant impediment to offshore energy development in U.S. waters. During operation, seabirds can collide and be displaced by turbines. During episodic pre-operation phases, cetaceans are most heavily impacted acoustically by pile driving (and similarly seismic air gun surveys for oil and gas exploration). The varying nature of impacts in space and time leads us to conclude that sites should be selected in space to minimize long-term operational impacts on seabirds, and timing of surveying and construction activities to be conducted in times of the year when sensitive migratory marine mammals are least present. We developed a novel spatiotemporal decision support framework that interactively visualizes tradeoffs between OWED industry profits and wildlife sensitivities, in both space and time. The framework highlights sites on a map that are the most profitable and least sensitive to seabirds. Within the U.S. Mid-Atlantic study area, the New York Call Areas are particularly well optimized for minimal impact on seabirds with maximal profits to OWED. For a given site, pre-operational activities (e.g. pile driving and seismic air gun surveying) are advised by cetacean sensitivity across months of the year that minimize impacts on migratory cetaceans, particularly those of highest conservation concern such as the North Atlantic right whale (Eubalaena Glacialis). For instance, within optimal sites for the New York Call Area the least impacting months are May and June. Other taxa are certainly affected by OWED and should be incorporated into this framework, but data on their distributions and/or sensitivities is currently less well known. Built with open-source software made publicly available, the authors hope this framework will be extended even more comprehensively into the future as our knowledge on species distributions and OWED sensitivities expands for streamlining environmental compliance.

Managing fishery development in sensitive ecosystems: identifying penguin habitat use to direct management in Antarctica

Trathan PN, Warwick-Evans V, Hinke JT, Young EF, Murphy EJ, Carneiro APB, Dias MP, Kovacs KM, Lowther AD, Godø OR, et al. Managing fishery development in sensitive ecosystems: identifying penguin habitat use to direct management in Antarctica. Ecosphere [Internet]. 2018 ;9(8):e02392. Available from: https://esajournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ecs2.2392
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

In the Southern Ocean, the at‐sea distributions of most predators of Antarctic krill are poorly known, primarily because tracking studies have only been undertaken on a restricted set of species, and then only at a limited number of sites. For chinstrap penguins, one of the most abundant krill predators breeding across the Antarctic Peninsula, we show that habitat models developed utilizing the distance from the colony and the bearing to the shelf‐edge, adjusting for the at‐sea density of Pygoscelis penguins from other colonies, can be used to predict, with a high level of confidence, the at‐sea distribution of chinstrap penguins from untracked colonies during the breeding season. Comparison of predicted penguin distributions with outputs from a high‐resolution oceanographic model shows that chinstrap penguins prefer nearshore habitats, over shallow bathymetry, with slow‐flowing waters, but that they sometimes also travel to areas beyond the edge of the continental shelf where the faster‐flowing waters of the Coastal Current or the fronts of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current occur. In the slow‐moving shelf waters, large penguin colonies may lead to krill depletion during incubation and chick‐rearing periods when penguins are acting as central place foragers. The habitats used by chinstrap penguins are also locations preferentially used by the commercial krill fishery, one of the last under‐developed marine capture fisheries anywhere on the planet. As it develops, this fishery has the potential to compete with chinstrap penguins and other natural krill predators. Scaling our habitat models by chinstrap penguin population data demonstrates where overlap with the fishery is likely to be most important. Our results suggest that a better understanding of krill retention and krill depletion in areas used by natural predators and by the krill fishery are needed, and that risk management strategies for the fishery should include assessment of how krill movement can satisfy the demands of both natural predators and the fishery across a range of spatial and temporal scales. Such information will help regional management authorities better understand how plausible ecosystem‐based management frameworks could be developed to ensure sustainable co‐existence of the fishery and competing natural predators.

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