Literature Library

Currently indexing 8704 titles

Oil and gas infrastructure decommissioning in marine protected areas: System complexity, analysis and challenges

Burdon D, Barnard S, Boyes SJ, Elliott M. Oil and gas infrastructure decommissioning in marine protected areas: System complexity, analysis and challenges. Marine Pollution Bulletin [Internet]. 2018 ;135:739 - 758. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025326X18305642
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Many offshore oil and gas production facilities are nearing the end of their operational life, with decommissioning now becoming a global challenge. The compatibility of decommissioning operations to marine protected areas (MPAs) creates further challenges. The recently-developed DAPSI(W)R(M) problem structuring framework (covering Drivers, Activities, Pressures, State changes, Impacts (on Welfare) and Responses (as Measures)) was applied here to interrogate the complexity of decommissioning oil and gas infrastructure within MPAs, with outputs feeding into the development of a novel database tool for Screening Potential Impacts of Decommissioning Activities (SPIDA). In meeting the current requirements of the marine regulatory regime, SPIDA provides a more streamlined, evidence-based process which can be applied by industry, statutory nature conservation bodies and regulators for identifying and evaluating evidence that supports the implications of decommissioning alternatives on the condition of MPAs. SPIDA has been developed to be adapted for other activities and sectors, including offshore renewables.

Linking humans to food webs: a framework for the classification of global fisheries

Bieg C, McCann KS, McMeans BC, Rooney N, Holtgrieve GW, Lek S, Bun NPeng, KC KB, Fraser E. Linking humans to food webs: a framework for the classification of global fisheries. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment [Internet]. 2018 . Available from: https://esajournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/fee.1933
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $38.00
Type: Journal Article

There is a widely acknowledged need to explicitly include humans in our conceptual and mathematical models of food webs. However, a simple and generalized method for incorporating humans into fisheries food webs has yet to be established. We developed a simple graphical framework for defining whole‐system inland fishery food webs that includes a continuum of fishery behaviors. This range of behaviors mimics those of generalist to specialist predators, which differentially influence ecosystem diversity, sustainability, and functioning. Fishery behaviors in this food‐web context are predicted to produce a range of “fishery types” – from targeted (ie specialist) to multispecies (ie generalist) inland fisheries – and relate to the socioeconomic status of fishery participants. Fishery participants in countries with low Human Development Index (HDI) values are highly connected through fisheries food webs relative to humans in more developed countries. Our framework shows that fisheries can occupy a variety of roles within a food‐web model and may thereby affect food‐web stability in different ways. This realization could help to improve sustainable fisheries management at a global scale.

Leveraging vessel traffic data and a temporary fishing closure to inform marine management

Elahi R, Ferretti F, Bastari A, Cerrano C, Colloca F, Kowalik J, Ruckelshaus M, Struck A, Micheli F. Leveraging vessel traffic data and a temporary fishing closure to inform marine management. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment [Internet]. 2018 . Available from: https://esajournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/fee.1936
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $38.00
Type: Journal Article

The benefits of protected areas depend on compliance, and achieving protection remains a challenge in intensely used areas where conservation and socioeconomic goals are in real or apparent conflict. One recent innovation – satellite tracking of commercial fishing vessels – has been introduced to help with ocean protection initiatives and build trust between fishers and managers. We paired vessel traffic data before and during a temporary closure in the Adriatic Sea with data on fish nursery habitat to examine changes in fishing effort and their potential consequences. Trawlers generally complied with the closure but maintained overall effort by trawling more intensely outside of the no‐trawl zone, especially near its borders and closer to shore. We detected stronger than expected fishing effort in a sub‐region within the protected area, suggesting that this location should be closely monitored for compliance. Notably, fishing effort was relocated to nursery grounds for some exploited species, illustrating the importance of understanding species’ life histories and habitat distribution in the design of protected areas.

Marine animal forests as useful indicators of entanglement by marine litter

Galgani F, Pham CK, Claro F, Consoli P. Marine animal forests as useful indicators of entanglement by marine litter. Marine Pollution Bulletin [Internet]. 2018 ;135:735 - 738. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025326X1830568X
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Entanglement of marine fauna is one of the principal impacts of marine litter, with an incidence that can vary strongly according to regions, the type and the quantity of marine litter. On the seafloor, areas dominated by sessile suspension feeders, such as tropical coral reefs or deep-sea coral and sponge aggregations, have been termed “animal forests” and have a strong potential to monitor the temporal and spatial trends of entanglement by marine litter, especially fishing gears. Several characteristics of these organisms represent advantages while avoiding constraints and bias. Biological constraints and logistical aspects, including tools, are discussed to better define a strategy for supporting long-term evaluation of accumulation and entanglement of marine litter.

Recreational fishers’ support for no-take marine reserves is high and increases with reserve age

Navarro M, Kragt ME, Hailu A, Langlois TJ. Recreational fishers’ support for no-take marine reserves is high and increases with reserve age. Marine Policy [Internet]. 2018 ;96:44 - 52. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X18301611
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

No-take marine reserves are essential for scientific monitoring, likely to contribute to the sustainability of targeted species, help to buffer biodiversity loss due to climate change impacts, and provide public education, tourism and diverse economic benefits to local communities. However, the establishment of no-take marine reserves has been a contentious policy in several countries because of a perception that recreational fishers are opposed to reserves. Nevertheless, it is unclear whether negative perceptions about reserves are widespread amongst recreational fishers, and whether perceptions change after the reserve has been created. In this study, recreational fishers were surveyed in ten Australian marine parks to determine levels of support and beliefs about the benefits and costs of no-take marine reserves. A ‘space-for-time’ approach was used to explore whether support is higher in older reserves. The results suggest that most recreational fishers who fish in established marine parks are supportive of the no-take marine reserves within them. On average, 63.3% of fishers support no-take marine reserves in their marine park, and 17.8% are opposed. Further, recreational fishers’ support for no-take marine reserves increases markedly with reserve age. This research indicates that most recreational fishers are supportive of no-take marine reserves within marine parks and that support increases over time.

Ingestion and contact with polyethylene microplastics does not cause acute toxicity on marine zooplankton

Beiras R, Bellas J, Cachot J, Cormier B, Cousin X, Engwall M, Gambardella C, Garaventa F, Keiter S, Le Bihanic F, et al. Ingestion and contact with polyethylene microplastics does not cause acute toxicity on marine zooplankton. Journal of Hazardous Materials [Internet]. In Press . Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304389418306617#!
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $41.95
Type: Journal Article

Toxicity of polyethylene microplastics (PE-MP) of size ranges similar to their natural food to zooplanktonic organisms representative of the main taxa present in marine plankton, including rotifers, copepods, bivalves, echinoderms and fish, was evaluated. Early life stages (ELS) were prioritized as testing models in order to maximize sensitivity. Treatments included particles spiked with benzophenone-3 (BP-3), a hydrophobic organic chemical used in cosmetics with direct input in coastal areas. Despite documented ingestion of both virgin and BP-3 spiked microplastics no acute toxicity was found at loads orders of magnitude above environmentally relevant concentrations on any of the invertebrate models. In fish tests some effects, including premature or reduced hatching, were observed after 12 d exposure at 10 mg L-1 of BP-3 spiked PE-MP. The results obtained do not support environmentally relevant risk of microplastics on marine zooplankton. Similar approaches testing more hydrophobic chemicals with higher acute toxicity are needed before these conclusions could be extended to other organic pollutants common in marine ecosystems. Therefore, the replacement of these polymers in consumer products must be carefully considered.

A global integrated analysis of open sea fish farming opportunities

Weiss CVC, Ondiviela B, Guanche R, Castellanos OF, Juanes JA. A global integrated analysis of open sea fish farming opportunities. Aquaculture [Internet]. 2018 ;497:234 - 245. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0044848618304605
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

The present work develops and implements at the global scale an innovative methodological approach to identify opportunities for farming seven fish species in offshore zones. The proposed methodology is based on a three-step approach integrated by: i) the biological suitability, to identify areas with optimal conditions for fish growth; ii) the structural suitability, to identify adequate areas for the integrity and durability of the cages; and iii) the operational suitability to evaluate the possibility of carrying out the operational and maintenance activities. The integration of these three complementary aspects, allowed the mapping of suitable zones for farming each fish species. It is shown, that the main potential zones for fish farming are concentrated in South America (South Pacific and South Atlantic Ocean), Africa (North Atlantic Ocean), Mediterranean Sea, Japanese and Chinese Seas and Oceania. The unprecedented global analysis presented by this work, considering comprehensive aspects other than only the biological requirements, provides guidelines to assist future studies in marine management.

Global hot spots of transshipment of fish catch at sea

Boerder K, Miller NA, Worm B. Global hot spots of transshipment of fish catch at sea. Science Advances [Internet]. 2018 ;4(7):eaat7159. Available from: http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/4/7/eaat7159
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

A major challenge in global fisheries is posed by transshipment of catch at sea from fishing vessels to refrigerated cargo vessels, which can obscure the origin of the catch and mask illicit practices. Transshipment remains poorly quantified at a global scale, as much of it is thought to occur outside of national waters. We used Automatic Identification System (AIS) vessel tracking data to quantify spatial patterns of transshipment for major fisheries and gear types. From 2012 to 2017, we observed 10,510 likely transshipment events, with trawlers (53%) and longliners (21%) involved in a majority of cases. Trawlers tended to transship in national waters, whereas longliners did so predominantly on the high seas. Spatial hot spots were seen off the coasts of Russia and West Africa, in the South Indian Ocean, and in the equatorial Pacific Ocean. Our study highlights novel ways to trace seafood supply chains and identifies priority areas for improved trade regulation and fisheries management at the global scale.

Identifying Global Patterns of Transshipment Behavior

Miller NA, Roan A, Hochberg T, Amos J, Kroodsma DA. Identifying Global Patterns of Transshipment Behavior. Frontiers in Marine Science [Internet]. 2018 ;5. Available from: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2018.00240/full
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Transshipment at sea, the offloading of catch from a fishing vessel to a refrigerated vessel far from port, can obscure the actual source of the catch, complicating sustainable fisheries management, and may allow illegally caught fish to enter the legitimate seafood market. Transshipment activities often occur in regions of unclear jurisdiction where policymakers or enforcement agencies may be slow to act against a challenge they cannot see. To address this limitation, we processed 32 billion Automatic Identification System (AIS) messages from ocean-going vessels from 2012 to the end of 2017 and identified and tracked 694 cargo vessels capable of transshipping at sea and transporting fish (referred to as transshipment vessels). We mapped 46,570 instances where these vessels loitered at sea long enough to receive a transshipment and 10,233 instances where we see a fishing vessel near a loitering transshipment vessel long enough to engage in transshipment. We found transshipment behaviors associated with regions and flag states exhibiting limited oversight; roughly 47% of the events occur on the high seas and 42% involve vessels flying flags of convenience. Transshipment behavior in the high seas is relatively common, with vessels responsible for 40% of the fishing in the high seas having at least one encounter with a transshipment vessel in this time period. Our analysis reveals that addressing the sustainability and human rights challenges (slavery, trafficking, bonded labor) associated with transshipment at sea will require a global perspective and transnational cooperation.

Evidence of acclimatization or adaptation in Hawaiian corals to higher ocean temperatures

Coles SL, Bahr KD, Rodgers K’uleiS, May SL, McGowan AE, Tsang A, Bumgarner J, Han JHoon. Evidence of acclimatization or adaptation in Hawaiian corals to higher ocean temperatures. PeerJ [Internet]. 2018 ;6:e5347. Available from: https://peerj.com/articles/5347/
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Ocean temperatures have been accelerating at an alarming rate mainly due to anthropogenic fossil fuel emissions. This has led to an increase in the severity and duration of coral bleaching events. Predicted projections for the state of reefs do not take into account the rates of adaptation or acclimatization of corals as these have not as yet been fully documented. To determine any possible changes in thermal tolerances, manipulative experiments were conducted to precisely replicate the initial, pivotal research defining threshold temperatures of corals nearly five decades ago. Statistically higher calcification rates, survivorship, and lower mortality were observed in Montipora capitata, Pocillopora damicornis, and Lobactis scutaria in the present study at 31 °C compared to the original 1970 findings. First whole colony mortality was also observed to occur sooner in 1970 than in 2017 in M. capitata (3 d vs. 15 d respectively), L. scutaria (3 d vs. 17 d), and in P. damicornis (3 d vs. 13 d). Additionally, bleaching occurred sooner in 1970 compared to the 2017 experiment across species. Irradiance was an important factor during the recovery period for mortality but did not significantly alter calcification. Mortality was decreased by 17% with a 50% reduction in irradiance during the recovery period. These findings provide the first evidence of coral acclimatization or adaptation to increasing ocean temperatures for corals collected from the same location and using close replication of the experiment conducted nearly 50 years earlier. An important factor in this increased resistance to elevated temperature may be related to removal of the discharge of treated sewage into Kāne‘ohe Bay and resulting decrease in nitrification and eutrophication. However, this level of increased temperature tolerance may not be occurring rapidly enough to escape the projected increased intensity of bleaching events, as evidenced by the recent 2014 and 2015 high coral mortality in Hawai‘i (34%) and in the tropics worldwide.

Marine partially protected areas: drivers of ecological effectiveness

Zupan M, Fragkopoulou E, Claudet J, Erzini K, Costa BHorta e, Gonçalves EJ. Marine partially protected areas: drivers of ecological effectiveness. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment [Internet]. 2018 . Available from: https://esajournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/fee.1934
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $38.00
Type: Journal Article

The number of marine protected areas (MPAs) has grown exponentially worldwide over the past decade in order to meet international targets. Most of these protected areas allow extraction of resources and are therefore designated as “partially protected areas” (PPAs). However, the effectiveness of PPAs remains unclear due to the high variability of use types permitted. Here, we carried out what we believe to be the first global meta‐analysis of PPAs using a regulation‐based classification system for MPAs to assess their ecological effectiveness. This novel classification allows for unambiguous differentiation between areas according to allowed use, which is the key feature determining PPA performance. Highly and moderately regulated areas exhibited higher biomass and abundance of commercial fish species, whereas fish abundance and biomass in weakly regulated areas differed little from unprotected areas. Notably, the effectiveness of moderately regulated areas can be enhanced by the presence of an adjacent fully protected area. We concluded that limited and well‐regulated uses in PPAs and the presence of an adjacent fully protected area confer ecological benefits, from which socioeconomic advantages are derived.

Sustainable financing of a national Marine Protected Area network in Fiji

Ison S, Hills J, Morris C, Stead SM. Sustainable financing of a national Marine Protected Area network in Fiji. Ocean & Coastal Management [Internet]. 2018 ;163:352 - 363. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0964569117308657
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

Marine Protected Areas (MPA) are mostly studied from an environmental context. A review of available information identified a lack of knowledge in sustainable mechanisms to finance MPA networks. At the United Nations Ocean Conference in 2017, Fiji reaffirmed its voluntary commitment to make 30% of its inshore and offshore marine area MPAs by 2020 under Sustainable Development Goal 14. The work presented here uses empirical data to explore potential benefits from selected community-based MPAs to recipient local stakeholders. A Willingness to Pay (WTP) and Willingness to Contribute Time (WtCT) method was used to explore the extent to which bottom-up governance systems represent a potential financing mechanism of a MPA network. Results of 115 interviews concluded that proximity to a fishing market, dependence on marine resources, food security, income and international commitments were significant variables influencing stakeholder's WTP and WtCT to manage a MPA. We argue that there is a discrepancy between WtCT and WTP driven by income constraints. Thus, by using WTP and WtCT to support financing of a MPA network, a Provincial Trust Fund (PTF) could promote an equitable and benefits-based contribution. Equally important, a PTF has a polycentric and decentralized governance model, which endorses sustainable management of traditional fishing communities. The conclusions provide insight into a bottom-up approach for long-term financial sustainability of Fiji's national MPA commitments.

Genetic and Biophysical Models Help Define Marine Conservation Focus Areas

Mertens LEA, Treml EA, von der Heyden S. Genetic and Biophysical Models Help Define Marine Conservation Focus Areas. Frontiers in Marine Science [Internet]. 2018 ;5. Available from: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2018.00268/full
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Ecological and environmental variables play a major role in the genetic structure of marine populations, but how oceanography affects their dispersal and associated connectivity remains far from being understood. To account for the effect of different dispersal strategies in terms of pelagic larvae and non-pelagic reproduction, we utilize the power of comparative phylogeographic analyses of five phylogenetically and functionally diverse intertidal species along the west coast of South Africa using population genetics and biophysical models within the Benguela Current system. Some broadcast spawners exhibit genetic panmixia, others show genetic structure similar to direct-developing species, suggesting complex recruitment patterns in rocky shore environments. Patterns of genetic structure do not correspond with pelagic larval competency period, with a broadcast spawning urchin displaying the highest levels of population structure. Biophysical models of larval dispersal reveal mixed dispersal patterns, with the strongest connections in a northward direction following the Benguela Current, yet most modeled species also show the capacity for southward (albeit weaker) migration among some sample localities. Some sites, particularly the most northern areas, show very low levels of potential connectivity. Lastly, we synthesized our results to highlight key areas for the development of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) that capture the evolutionary patterns of marine species of the west coast and find that the results from our molecular and biophysical analyses are coherent with previous suggestions for a network of protected areas.

Extending the concept of institutional analysis to the marine spatial planning practice

Yatim MHM, Omar AH, Abdullah NM, Sarip A. Extending the concept of institutional analysis to the marine spatial planning practice. IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science [Internet]. 2018 ;169:012010. Available from: http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1755-1315/169/1/012010
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Policy formation for the marine environment seems to be a central issue for the maritime nations in order to propose a strategic plan for marine spatial governance. The idea of forming a policy is about understanding the action principle among the institutions involved that guides towards an effective decision making process. The analysis that suits into the reformation of policies is the Institutional Analysis and Development Framework (IAD) that was proposed by Elinor Ostrom, the American political scientist focusing into the institutional behaviours. This paper strives to raise awareness of integrating the concept of Institutional Analysis and Development Framework into the effective practice of Marine Spatial Planning (MSP) in Malaysia. The integration of social science knowledge into the Ecosystem Based Management (EBM) cycles seems to show a growing number in the past decade and the results obtained are reviewed to ensure the suitability of integrating the idea of Institutional Analysis & Development (IAD) into the Malaysian MSP practice to predict institutional behaviour and relationship for the outcomes.

Mapping ecological indicators of human impact with statistical and machine learning methods: Tests on the California coast

Stock A, Haupt AJ, Mach M, Micheli F. Mapping ecological indicators of human impact with statistical and machine learning methods: Tests on the California coast. Ecological Informatics [Internet]. In Press . Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1574954118300736
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Coastal ecosystems are exposed to multiple anthropogenic stressors such as fishing, pollution, and climate change. Ecosystem-based coastal management requires understanding where the combination of multiple stressors has large cumulative effects and where actions to address impacts are most urgently needed. However, the effects of multiple stressors on coastal and marine ecosystems are often non-linear and interactive. This complexity is not captured by commonly used spatial models for mapping human impacts. Flexible statistical and machine learning models like random forests have thus been used as an alternative modeling approach to identify important stressors and to make spatial predictions of their combined effects. However, tests of such models' prediction skill have been limited. Therefore, we tested how well ten statistical and machine learning methods predicted three ecological indicators of coastal marine ecosystem condition (kelp biodiversity, fish biomass, and rocky intertidal biodiversity) off California, USA. Spatial data representing anthropogenic stressors and ocean uses as well as natural gradients were used as predictors. The models' prediction errors were estimated by double spatial block cross-validation. The best models achieved mean squared errors about 25% lower than a null model for kelp biodiversity and fish biomass; none of the tested models worked well for rocky intertidal biodiversity. The models captured general trends, but not local variability of the indicators. For kelp biodiversity, the best performing method was principal components regression. For fish biomass, the best performing method was boosted regression trees. However, after tuning, this model did not include any interactions between stressors, and ridge regression (a constrained linear model) performed almost as well. While in theory flexible machine learning methods are required to represent the complex stressor-ecosystem state relationships revealed by experimental ecologists, with our data, this flexibility could not be harnessed because more flexible models overfitted due to small sample sizes and low signal-to-noise ratio. The main challenge for harnessing the flexibility of statistical and machine learning methods to link ecological indicators and anthropogenic stressors is obtaining more suitable data. In particular, better data describing the spatial and temporal distribution of human uses and stressors are needed. We conclude by discussing methodological implications for future research.

Fish and seagrass communities vary across a marine reserve boundary, but seasonal variation in small fish abundance overshadows top-down effects of large consumer exclosures

Douglass JG, Paperno R, Reyier EA, Hines AH. Fish and seagrass communities vary across a marine reserve boundary, but seasonal variation in small fish abundance overshadows top-down effects of large consumer exclosures. Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology [Internet]. 2018 ;507:39 - 52. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022098117303817
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

A growing number of examples indicate that large predators can alter seagrass ecosystem structure and processes via top-down trophic interactions. However, the nature and strength of those interactions varies with biogeographic context, emphasizing the need for region-specific investigations. We investigated spatial and temporal variation in predatory fish and seagrass communities across a Marine Protected Area (MPA) boundary in the Banana River Lagoon, Florida (USA), assessing trophic roles of intermediate consumers, and performing a large-consumer exclusion experiment in the MPA. Large, predatory fishes were most abundant within the MPA, while some mid-sized fishes were more abundant outside it. Small, seagrass-resident fishes, epifaunal invertebrates, and macrophytes also differed across the MPA boundary, but varied more among individual sites and seasonally. We cannot conclusively attribute these patterns to MPA status because we lack data from prior to MPA establishment and lack study replication at the level of MPA. Nevertheless, other patterns among our data are consistent with hypothesized mechanisms of top-down control. E.g., inverse seasonal patterns in the abundance of organisms at adjacent trophic levels, coupled with stable C and N isotope and gut contents data, suggest top-down control of crustacean grazers by seasonal recruitment of small fishes. Large-consumer exclosures in the MPA increased the abundance of mid-sized predatory and omnivorous fishes, but had few impacts on lower trophic levels. Results suggest that large-scale variation in large, predatory fish abundance in this system does not strongly affect seagrass-resident fish, invertebrate, and algal communities, which appear to be driven more by habitat structure and seasonal variation in small fish abundance.

Can coastal scenery be managed? The Valparaíso region, Chile as a case study

Rangel-Buitrago N, Contreras-López M, Martínez C, Williams A. Can coastal scenery be managed? The Valparaíso region, Chile as a case study. Ocean & Coastal Management [Internet]. 2018 ;163:383 - 400. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0964569118303223
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

Coastal tourism developed along the Valparaíso region of Chile is being threatened by a very particular issue: scenery degradation related to extreme urbanization and collateral effects. This paper presents the results of scenic evaluation of 96 sites along this region. The scenic evaluation assesses values from a checklist of 18 physical and 8 human parameters, and permits calculation of a scenic evaluation index (D Value), which classifies coastal sites into five classes: Class I, usually natural areas of top scenic characteristics, to Class V, poor scenic natural areas with a higher impact of human interventions. In summary, 14 sites (15%) appeared in Class I; 7 (7%) in Class II; 9 (9%) in Class III; 17 (18%) in Class IV and 49 sites (51%) in Class V. This evaluation provides a complete scenic assessment overview of the Valparaiso Region, allowing implementation of an adequate management strategy based on knowledge of coastal scenery for the maintenance and preservation of scenic quality.

Comparing citizen science reports and systematic surveys of marine mammal distributions and densities

Harvey GKA, Nelson TA, Paquet PC, Ferster CJ, Fox CH. Comparing citizen science reports and systematic surveys of marine mammal distributions and densities. Biological Conservation [Internet]. 2018 ;226:92 - 100. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006320718303471
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

Citizen science observations represent a significant and growing source of species and ecosystem knowledge. These data have potential to support traditional surveys. Databases of citizen observations of wildlife are growing, but how to use this information for scientific purposes is less clear owing to uncertainty in sampling distribution and data quality. In this study, we demonstrate how mapping cetacean patterns using citizen observations and systematic surveys generate consistent and different understandings of cetacean distributions and densities, and evaluate potential risk by assessing cumulative human effects in British Columbia, Canada. We used GIS-based map comparison methods that quantified differences and similarities between geographic datasets to locate where cetacean distributions and densities had spatially unique or spatially analogous representation. Where spatial clusters in both data sources are congruent, we interpret with a higher level of confidence that species occur, and mapped patterns accurately reflect distribution and density. In areas where datasets exhibit dissimilar species densities and distributions, we acknowledge lower confidence and advise further sampling. Regions of agreement were primarily in the central-western portion of the study area (off the southeastern coast of Haida Gwaii); areas of disagreement were heterogeneously distributed across the study area. Spatial clusters from citizen data exhibited significantly higher cumulative human effect scores than from systematic surveys, despite previous data adjustments for human effort. We demonstrate the use of citizen observations as a confirmatory dataset to broaden ecological exploration by augmenting scientific survey datasets and identifying strategic areas for future data collection efforts.Gwaii); areas of disagreement were heterogeneously distributed across the study area. Spatial clusters from citizen data exhibited significantly higher cumulative human effect scores than from systematic surveys, despite previous data adjustments for human effort. We demonstrate the use of citizen observations as a confirmatory dataset to broaden ecological exploration by augmenting scientific survey datasets and identifying strategic areas for future data collection efforts.

The effects of plastic bags presence on a macrobenthic community in a polluted estuary

Clemente CCC, Paresque K, Santos PJP. The effects of plastic bags presence on a macrobenthic community in a polluted estuary. Marine Pollution Bulletin [Internet]. 2018 ;135:630 - 635. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025326X18305563
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

The damaging effects of marine debris on wildlife are often noted through the observation of animals that ingest and/or become entangled in debris. Yet, few studies have evaluated the effects of marine litter on benthic habitats. The aim of this study was to investigate if the presence of plastic bags has any effect on benthic macrofauna in an estuary located in an urban area in North-eastern Brazil. Biogeochemical and macrofauna samples were obtained from 10 different deposition locations (location factor), under, border and distant (treatment factor) from plastic bags. The results did not show any significant alterations in the biogeochemical parameters of the sediment due to treatment effect except for summed microphytobenthic pigments. The macrobenthic community structure responded to treatment. The greatest dissimilarity (34%) was between samples that were under and distant. Effects occurred despite the high dynamics of deposition-resuspension of plastic bags and the dominance of opportunistic species. Changes in community structure are a complex result of plastic bags effects on species ecological interactions in the polluted estuarine environment, attracting deposit feeders, diminishing suspension feeders and providing mechanical protection against predation by seabirds.

Production of methane and ethylene from plastic in the environment

Royer S-J, Ferrón S, Wilson ST, Karl DM. Production of methane and ethylene from plastic in the environment Pardha-Saradhi P. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2018 ;13(8):e0200574. Available from: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0200574
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Mass production of plastics started nearly 70 years ago and the production rate is expected to double over the next two decades. While serving many applications because of their durability, stability and low cost, plastics have deleterious effects on the environment. Plastic is known to release a variety of chemicals during degradation, which has a negative impact on biota. Here, we show that the most commonly used plastics produce two greenhouse gases, methane and ethylene, when exposed to ambient solar radiation. Polyethylene, which is the most produced and discarded synthetic polymer globally, is the most prolific emitter of both gases. We demonstrate that the production of trace gases from virgin low-density polyethylene increase with time, with rates at the end of a 212-day incubation of 5.8 nmol g-1 d-1 of methane, 14.5 nmol g-1 d-1 of ethylene, 3.9 nmol g-1 d-1 of ethane and 9.7 nmol g-1 d-1 of propylene. Environmentally aged plastics incubated in water for at least 152 days also produced hydrocarbon gases. In addition, low-density polyethylene emits these gases when incubated in air at rates ~2 times and ~76 times higher than when incubated in water for methane and ethylene, respectively. Our results show that plastics represent a heretofore unrecognized source of climate-relevant trace gases that are expected to increase as more plastic is produced and accumulated in the environment.

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