A Global Estimate of Seafood Consumption by Coastal Indigenous Peoples

Last modified: 
December 16, 2019 - 1:26pm
Type: Journal Article
Year of publication: 2016
Date published: 12/2016
Authors: Andrés Cisneros-Montemayor, Daniel Pauly, Lauren Weatherdon, Yoshitaka Ota
Journal title: PLOS ONE
Volume: 11
Issue: 12
Pages: e0166681

Coastal Indigenous peoples rely on ocean resources and are highly vulnerable to ecosystem and economic change. Their challenges have been observed and recognized at local and regional scales, yet there are no global-scale analyses to inform international policies. We compile available data for over 1,900 coastal Indigenous communities around the world representing 27 million people across 87 countries. Based on available data at local and regional levels, we estimate a total global yearly seafood consumption of 2.1 million (1.5 million–2.8 million) metric tonnes by coastal Indigenous peoples, equal to around 2% of global yearly commercial fisheries catch. Results reflect the crucial role of seafood for these communities; on average, consumption per capita is 15 times higher than non-Indigenous country populations. These findings contribute to an urgently needed sense of scale to coastal Indigenous issues, and will hopefully prompt increased recognition and directed research regarding the marine knowledge and resource needs of Indigenous peoples. Marine resources are crucial to the continued existence of coastal Indigenous peoples, and their needs must be explicitly incorporated into management policies.

Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No