Artisanal fish fences pose broad and unexpected threats to the tropical coastal seascape

Last modified: 
December 13, 2019 - 1:02pm
Type: Journal Article
Year of publication: 2019
Date published: 05/2019
Authors: Dan Exton, Gabby Ahmadia, Leanne Cullen-Unsworth, Jamaluddin Jompa, Duncan May, Joel Rice, Paul Simonin, Richard Unsworth, David Smith
Journal title: Nature Communications
Volume: 10
Issue: 1

Gear restrictions are an important management tool in small-scale tropical fisheries, improving sustainability and building resilience to climate change. Yet to identify the management challenges and complete footprint of individual gears, a broader systems approach is required that integrates ecological, economic and social sciences. Here we apply this approach to artisanal fish fences, intensively used across three oceans, to identify a previously underrecognized gear requiring urgent management attention. A longitudinal case study shows increased effort matched with large declines in catch success and corresponding reef fish abundance. We find fish fences to disrupt vital ecological connectivity, exploit > 500 species with high juvenile removal, and directly damage seagrass ecosystems with cascading impacts on connected coral reefs and mangroves. As semi-permanent structures in otherwise open-access fisheries, they create social conflict by assuming unofficial and unregulated property rights, while their unique high-investment-low-effort nature removes traditional economic and social barriers to overfishing.

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Summary available?: 
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