Biomonitoring acidification using marine gastropods

Last modified: 
July 15, 2019 - 3:36pm
Type: Journal Article
Year of publication: 2019
Date published: 07/2019
Authors: David Marshall, Ahmed Abdelhady, Dennis Wah, Nurshahida Mustapha, Stefan Gӧdeke, Liyanage De Silva, Jason Hall-Spencer
Journal title: Science of The Total Environment
ISSN: 00489697

Ocean acidification is mainly being monitored using data loggers which currently offer limited coverage of marine ecosystems. Here, we trial the use of gastropod shells to monitor acidification on rocky shores. Animals living in areas with highly variable pH (8.6–5.9) were compared with those from sites with more stable pH (8.6–7.9). Differences in site pH were reflected in size, shape and erosion patterns in Nerita chamaeleon and Planaxis sulcatus. Shells from acidified sites were shorter, more globular and more eroded, with both of these species proving to be good biomonitors. After an assessment of baseline weathering, shell erosion can be used to indicate the level of exposure of organisms to corrosive water, providing a tool for biomonitoring acidification in heterogeneous intertidal systems. A shell erosion ranking system was found to clearly discriminate between acidified and reference sites. Being spatially-extensive, this approach can identify coastal areas of greater or lesser acidification. Cost-effective and simple shell erosion ranking is amenable to citizen science projects and could serve as an early-warning-signal for natural or anthropogenic acidification of coastal waters.

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