Freely-available Literature

Currently indexing 1800 freely-available titles

The following titles are freely-available, or include a link to a preprint or postprint.

Evaluating patterns and drivers of spatial change in the recreational guided fishing sector in Alaska

Chan MN, Beaudreau AH, Loring PA. Evaluating patterns and drivers of spatial change in the recreational guided fishing sector in Alaska Belgrano A. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2017 ;12(6):e0179584. Available from: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0179584
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Understanding the impacts of recreational fishing on habitats and species, as well as the social and ecological importance of place to anglers, requires information on the spatial distribution of fishing activities. This study documented long-term changes in core fishing areas of a major recreational fishery in Alaska and identified biological, regulatory, social, and economic drivers of spatial fishing patterns by charter operators. Using participatory mapping and in-person interviews, we characterized the spatial footprint of 46 charter operators in the communities of Sitka and Homer since the 1990s. The spatial footprint differed between Homer and Sitka respondents, with Homer operators consistently using larger areas for Pacific halibut than Sitka operators. Homer and Sitka showed opposite trends in core fishing location area over time, with an overall decrease in Homer and an overall increase in Sitka. For both Sitka and Homer respondents, the range of areas fished was greater for Pacific halibut than for rockfish/lingcod or Pacific salmon. Spatial patterns were qualitatively different between businesses specializing in single species trips and those that operated multispecies trips and between businesses with one vessel and those with multiple vessels. In Homer, the most frequently cited reasons for changes in the location and/or extent of fishing were changes in trip type and the price of fuel, while in Sitka, the most frequently cited reasons for spatial shifts were changes to Pacific halibut regulations and gaining experience or exploring new locations. The diversity of charter fishing strategies in Alaska may allow individual charter operators to respond differently to perturbations and thus maintain resilience of the industry as a whole to social, environmental, and regulatory change. This research also highlights the importance of understanding fishers’ diverse portfolio of activities to effective ecosystem-based management.

High tolerance to temperature and salinity change should enable scleractinian coral Platygyra acuta from marginal environments to persist under future climate change

Chui APui Yi, Ang P. High tolerance to temperature and salinity change should enable scleractinian coral Platygyra acuta from marginal environments to persist under future climate change Chen CAllen. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2017 ;12(6):e0179423. Available from: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0179423
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

With projected changes in the marine environment under global climate change, the effects of single stressors on corals have been relatively well studied. However, more focus should be placed on the interactive effects of multiple stressors if their impacts upon corals are to be assessed more realistically. Elevation of sea surface temperature is projected under global climate change, and future increases in precipitation extremes related to the monsoon are also expected. Thus, the lowering of salinity could become a more common phenomenon and its impact on corals could be significant as extreme precipitation usually occurs during the coral spawning season. Here, we investigated the interactive effects of temperature [24, 27 (ambient), 30, 32°C] and salinity [33 psu (ambient), 30, 26, 22, 18, 14 psu] on larval settlement, post-settlement survival and early growth of the dominant coral Platygyra acuta from Hong Kong, a marginal environment for coral growth. The results indicate that elevated temperatures (+3°C and +5°C above ambient) did not have any significant effects on larval settlement success and post-settlement survival for up to 56 days of prolonged exposure. Such thermal tolerance was markedly higher than that reported in the literature for other coral species. Moreover, there was a positive effect of these elevated temperatures in reducing the negative effects of lowered salinity (26 psu) on settlement success. The enhanced settlement success brought about by elevated temperatures, together with the high post-settlement survival recorded up to 44 and 8 days of exposure under +3°C and +5°C ambient respectively, resulted in the overall positive effects of elevated temperatures on recruitment success. These results suggest that projected elevation in temperature over the next century should not pose any major problem for the recruitment success of Pacuta. The combined effects of higher temperatures and lowered salinity (26 psu) could even be beneficial. Therefore, corals that are currently present in marginal environments like Hong Kong, as exemplified by the dominant Pacuta, are likely to persist in a warmer and intermittently less saline, future ocean.

Climate change and marine fisheries: Least developed countries top global index of vulnerability

Blasiak R, Spijkers J, Tokunaga K, Pittman J, Yagi N, Österblom H. Climate change and marine fisheries: Least developed countries top global index of vulnerability MacKenzie BR. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2017 ;12(6):e0179632. Available from: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0179632
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Future impacts of climate change on marine fisheries have the potential to negatively influence a wide range of socio-economic factors, including food security, livelihoods and public health, and even to reshape development trajectories and spark transboundary conflict. Yet there is considerable variability in the vulnerability of countries around the world to these effects. We calculate a vulnerability index of 147 countries by drawing on the most recent data related to the impacts of climate change on marine fisheries. Building on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change framework for vulnerability, we first construct aggregate indices for exposure, sensitivity and adaptive capacity using 12 primary variables. Seven out of the ten most vulnerable countries on the resulting index are Small Island Developing States, and the top quartile of the index includes countries located in Africa (17), Asia (7), North America and the Caribbean (4) and Oceania (8). More than 87% of least developed countries are found within the top half of the vulnerability index, while the bottom half includes all but one of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development member states. This is primarily due to the tremendous variation in countries’ adaptive capacity, as no such trends are evident from the exposure or sensitivity indices. A negative correlation exists between vulnerability and per capita carbon emissions, and the clustering of states at different levels of development across the vulnerability index suggests growing barriers to meeting global commitments to reducing inequality, promoting human well-being and ensuring sustainable cities and communities. The index provides a useful tool for prioritizing the allocation of climate finance, as well as activities aimed at capacity building and the transfer of marine technology.

Managing consequences of climate-driven species redistribution requires integration of ecology, conservation and social science

Bonebrake TC, Brown CJ, Bell JD, Blanchard JL, Chauvenet A, Champion C, Chen I-C, Clark TD, Colwell RK, Danielsen F, et al. Managing consequences of climate-driven species redistribution requires integration of ecology, conservation and social science. Biological Reviews [Internet]. 2017 . Available from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/brv.12344/abstract
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $38.00
Type: Journal Article

Climate change is driving a pervasive global redistribution of the planet's species. Species redistribution poses new questions for the study of ecosystems, conservation science and human societies that require a coordinated and integrated approach. Here we review recent progress, key gaps and strategic directions in this nascent research area, emphasising emerging themes in species redistribution biology, the importance of understanding underlying drivers and the need to anticipate novel outcomes of changes in species ranges. We highlight that species redistribution has manifest implications across multiple temporal and spatial scales and from genes to ecosystems. Understanding range shifts from ecological, physiological, genetic and biogeographical perspectives is essential for informing changing paradigms in conservation science and for designing conservation strategies that incorporate changing population connectivity and advance adaptation to climate change. Species redistributions present challenges for human well-being, environmental management and sustainable development. By synthesising recent approaches, theories and tools, our review establishes an interdisciplinary foundation for the development of future research on species redistribution. Specifically, we demonstrate how ecological, conservation and social research on species redistribution can best be achieved by working across disciplinary boundaries to develop and implement solutions to climate change challenges. Future studies should therefore integrate existing and complementary scientific frameworks while incorporating social science and human-centred approaches. Finally, we emphasise that the best science will not be useful unless more scientists engage with managers, policy makers and the public to develop responsible and socially acceptable options for the global challenges arising from species redistributions.

Entanglement in and ingestion of fishing gear and other marine debris by Florida manatees, 1993 to 2012

Reinert TR, Spellman AC, Bassett BL. Entanglement in and ingestion of fishing gear and other marine debris by Florida manatees, 1993 to 2012. Endangered Species Research [Internet]. 2017 ;32:415 - 427. Available from: http://www.int-res.com/abstracts/esr/v32/p415-427/
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Entanglement in and ingestion of marine debris by marine life has become a recognized threat worldwide, and the endangered Florida manatee is no exception. Manatees are known to become entangled in various types of fishing gear and other marine debris, and foreign objects are often found in the gastrointestinal tract of dead manatees. We examined a 20 yr dataset (1993 to 2012) of manatee rescue and necropsy records for evidence of entanglement in or ingestion of marine debris. In over 6500 manatee necropsy reports, over 11% either had ingested or showed evidence of entanglement in marine debris (or both). Fifty manatees died as a direct result of either entanglement in or, most commonly, ingestion of marine debris; fishery-related gear was involved in over 70% of these cases. With respect to live manatee rescues (n = 1244), over 25% were related to entanglement in or ingestion of fishery gear or marine debris, making entanglement the top anthropogenic reason for rescue during this time. Fishing gear, primarily trap lines and monofilament fishing lines, was a factor in over 85% of these rescues. Female manatees in particular were disproportionally affected by marine debris. The Florida manatee represents an example of estuarine fauna that is subject to harm from marine debris, and continued efforts to reduce and remove marine debris from estuarine environments will benefit manatees and other estuarine species.

Estimating fish abundance at spawning aggregations from courtship sound levels

Rowell TJ, Demer DA, Aburto-Oropeza O, Cota-Nieto JJosé, Hyde JR, Erisman BE. Estimating fish abundance at spawning aggregations from courtship sound levels. Scientific Reports [Internet]. 2017 ;7(1). Available from: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-03383-8
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Sound produced by fish spawning aggregations (FSAs) permits the use of passive acoustic methods to identify the timing and location of spawning. However, difficulties in relating sound levels to abundance have impeded the use of passive acoustics to conduct quantitative assessments of biomass. Here we show that models of measured fish sound production versus independently measured fish density can be generated to estimate abundance and biomass from sound levels at FSAs. We compared sound levels produced by spawning Gulf Corvina (Cynoscion othonopterus) with simultaneous measurements of density from active acoustic surveys in the Colorado River Delta, Mexico. During the formation of FSAs, we estimated peak abundance at 1.53 to 1.55 million fish, which equated to a biomass of 2,133 to 2,145 metric tons. Sound levels ranged from 0.02 to 12,738 Pa2, with larger measurements observed on outgoing tides. The relationship between sound levels and densities was variable across the duration of surveys but stabilized during the peak spawning period after high tide to produce a linear relationship. Our results support the use of active acoustic methods to estimate density, abundance, and biomass of fish at FSAs; using appropriately scaled empirical relationships, sound levels can be used to infer these estimates.

Population Genetics, Demographic Connectivity, and the Design of Marine Reserves

Palumbi SR. Population Genetics, Demographic Connectivity, and the Design of Marine Reserves. Ecological Applications [Internet]. 2003 ;13(sp1):146 - 158. Available from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1890/1051-0761(2003)013%5b0146:PGDCAT%5d2.0.CO%3b2/abstract
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Genetic analyses of marine population structure often find only slight geographic differentiation in species with high dispersal potential. Interpreting the significance of this slight genetic signal has been difficult because even mild genetic structure implies very limited demographic exchange between populations, but slight differentiation could also be due to sampling error. Examination of genetic isolation by distance, in which close populations are more similar than distant ones, has the potential to increase confidence in the significance of slight genetic differentiation. Simulations of one-dimensional stepping stone populations with particular larval dispersal regimes shows that isolation by distance is most obvious when comparing populations separated by 2–5 times the mean larval dispersal distance. Available data on fish and invertebrates can be calibrated with this simulation approach and suggest mean dispersal distances of 25–150 km.

Design of marine reserve systems requires an understanding of larval transport in and out of reserves, whether reserves will be self-seeding, whether they will accumulate recruits from surrounding exploited areas, and whether reserve networks can exchange recruits. Direct measurements of mean larval dispersal are needed to understand connectivity in a reserve system, but such measurements are extremely difficult. Genetic patterns of isolation by distance have the potential to add to direct measurement of larval dispersal distance and can help set the appropriate geographic scales on which marine reserve systems will function well.

Genetic Evidence for the Uncoupling of Local Aquaculture Activities and a Population of an Invasive Species? A Case Study of Pacific Oysters (Crassostrea gigas)

Kochmann J, Carlsson J, Crowe TP, Mariani S. Genetic Evidence for the Uncoupling of Local Aquaculture Activities and a Population of an Invasive Species? A Case Study of Pacific Oysters (Crassostrea gigas). Journal of Heredity [Internet]. 2012 ;103(5):661 - 671. Available from: https://academic.oup.com/jhered/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/jhered/ess042
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Human-mediated introduction of nonnative species into coastal areas via aquaculture is one of the main pathways that can lead to biological invasions. To develop strategies to counteract invasions, it is critical to determine whether populations establishing in the wild are self-sustaining or based on repeated introductions. Invasions by the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) have been associated with the growing oyster aquaculture industry worldwide. In this study, temporal genetic variability of farmed and wild oysters from the largest enclosed bay in Ireland was assessed to reconstruct the recent biological history of the feral populations using 7 anonymous microsatellites and 7 microsatellites linked to expressed sequence tags (ESTs). There was no evidence of EST-linked markers showing footprints of selection. Allelic richness was higher in feral than in aquaculture samples (P = 0.003, paired t-test). Significant deviations from Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium due to heterozygote deficiencies were detected for almost all loci and samples, most likely explained by the presence of null alleles. Relatively high genetic differentiation was found between aquaculture and feral oysters (largest pairwise multilocus FST 0.074, P < 0.01) and between year classes of oysters from aquaculture (largest pairwise multilocus FST 0.073, P < 0.01), which was also confirmed by the strong separation of aquaculture and wild samples using Bayesian clustering approaches. A 10-fold higher effective population size (Ne) and a high number of private alleles in wild oysters suggest an established self-sustaining feral population. The wild oyster population studied appears demographically independent from the current aquaculture activities in the estuary and alternative scenarios of introduction pathways are discussed.

Linking tagging technology and molecular genetics to gain insight in the spatial dynamics of two stocks of cod in Northeast Atlantic waters

Michalsen K, Johansen T, Subbey S, Beck A. Linking tagging technology and molecular genetics to gain insight in the spatial dynamics of two stocks of cod in Northeast Atlantic waters. ICES Journal of Marine Science [Internet]. 2014 ;71(6):1417 - 1432. Available from: https://academic.oup.com/icesjms/article/71/6/1417/2835581/Linking-tagging-technology-and-molecular-genetics
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The Northeast Arctic cod (Gadus morhua L.: NEAC) remains the most abundant cod stock in the North Atlantic, while the catches of the partially co-occurring Norwegian coastal cod (NCC) stocks have dramatically decreased in recent years. To ensure effective management of the two stocks, it is necessary to know if the population genetic structure is associated with any pattern in the spatial dynamics or whether it is affected by any distinct environmental factors. By combining information from electronic data storage tags (DST) and molecular genetics methods with statistical tools, we have been able to associate spatial dynamics and distinct environmental factors to the two cod stocks. In general, adult NEAC migrate between deep, warm overwintering grounds and shallow summer feeding grounds where water temperatures maybe low. In contrast, NCC do not undertake large-scale seasonal migrations, show little seasonal variation in depth distribution, and experience the opposite seasonal change in temperature compared with NEAC. However, within the NCC group, some individuals did conduct longer horizontal movements than others. Even though the distances calculated in this study represent the shortest distance between release and recapture positions, they are far higher than previously reported by NCC. Distinctive depth profiles indicate that this migrant NCC have moved out of the area, passing the deep trenches outside Lofoten while more stationary NCC occupies shallower depths throughout the year. The temperature profiles also indicate that migrant and stationary NCC has occupied different areas during the year. We demonstrate that the combination of information from DSTs and molecular genetics offers a deeper understanding of individual cod behaviour, provides an insight in the spatial dynamics of the species, and ultimately, improves the scientific basis for management of a complex mixed fishery of Atlantic cod.

Individual transferable quotas and ecosystem-based fisheries management: it's all in the T

Gibbs MT. Individual transferable quotas and ecosystem-based fisheries management: it's all in the T. Fish and Fisheries [Internet]. 2009 ;10(4):470 - 474. Available from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-2979.2009.00343.x/abstract
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $38.00
Type: Journal Article

Recent articles in high-profile journals advocating the widespread establishment of economic rights-based approaches for managing fisheries has re-kindled the debate over the efficacy of incentive-based vs. regulatory-based management approaches. Inspection of these works, written from the particular perspectives of economics, fisheries biology, or marine ecology, reveals that advocates of rights-based regimes such as Individual Transferrable Quotas are sometimes recommending these policy instruments for quite different reasons. Hence, the advantageous attributes of rights-based approaches from the perspective of one discipline may be quite different when seen from the perspective of another discipline. This is of concern as it exposes a tendency for particular disciplines to consider only the advantages of rights-based approaches, such as establishing a harvest cap, but to implicitly discount the disadvantages such as less attention being paid to critical ecological and ecosystem issues.

Finding the accelerator and brake in an individual quota fishery: linking ecology, economics, and fleet dynamics of US West Coast trawl fisheries

Kaplan IC, Holland DS, Fulton EA. Finding the accelerator and brake in an individual quota fishery: linking ecology, economics, and fleet dynamics of US West Coast trawl fisheries. ICES Journal of Marine Science [Internet]. 2014 ;71(2):308 - 319. Available from: https://academic.oup.com/icesjms/article/71/2/308/779541/Finding-the-accelerator-and-brake-in-an-individual
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

In 2011, the Pacific Fisheries Management Council implemented an individual transferrable quota (ITQ) system for the US West Coast groundfish trawl fleet. Under the ITQ system, each vessel now receives transferrable annual allocations of quota for 29 groundfish species, including target and bycatch species. Here we develop an ecosystem and fleet dynamics model to identify which components of an ITQ system are likely to drive responses in effort, target species catch, bycatch, and overall profitability. In the absence of penalties for discarding over-quota fish, ITQs lead to large increases in fishing effort and bycatch. The penalties fishermen expect for exceeding quota have the largest effect on fleet behaviour, capping effort and total bycatch. Quota prices for target or bycatch species have lesser impacts on fishing dynamics, even up to bycatch quota prices of $50 kg−1. Ports that overlap less with bycatch species can increase effort under individual quotas, while other ports decrease effort. Relative to a prior management system, ITQs with penalties for exceeding quotas lead to increased target species landings and lower bycatch, but with strong variation among species. The model illustrates how alternative fishery management policies affect profitability, sustainability and the ecosystem.

Property Rights in Fisheries: How Much Can Individual Transferable Quotas Accomplish?

Arnason R. Property Rights in Fisheries: How Much Can Individual Transferable Quotas Accomplish?. Review of Environmental Economics and Policy [Internet]. 2012 ;6(2):217 - 236. Available from: https://academic.oup.com/reep/article-abstract/6/2/217/1543475/Property-Rights-in-Fisheries-How-Much-Can?maxtoshow=&HITS=10&hits=9&RESULTFORMAT=&andorexacttitle=and&andorexacttitleabs=and&fulltext=Ecosystem%20based%20management&andorexactfulltext=and&sear
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $42.00
Type: Journal Article

Individual transferable quotas (ITQs) are one of the property rights instruments that have been employed to improve economic efficiency in fisheries. ITQs are not high-quality property rights in the basic fundamental marine resources on which fisheries are based. As a result ITQs cannot be expected to generate full efficiency in the use of these resources. This article examines to what extent ITQs are capable of generating economic efficiency in fisheries. It is shown that ITQs can greatly improve efficiency in fishing. Moreover, by including recreational fishers in the system, ITQs can strike an efficient balance between commercial and recreational fishing. On the negative side, it is shown that on their own, ITQs are not capable of generating full efficiency in fisheries. In particular, ITQs are not sufficient for setting the socially optimal total allowable catch, ensuring the optimal use of the ecosystem, or harmonizing fishing with conflicting uses of marine resources such as marine tourism, mining, and conservation. Potentially counteracting these limitations, ITQ holders as a group have an incentive to manage overall ecosystem use for the long-term benefit of their fishery and negotiate the adjustment of their fishing activity toward the interests of conflicting uses of the marine resources.

The evolution of New Zealand's fisheries science and management systems under ITQs

Mace PM, Sullivan KJ, Cryer M. The evolution of New Zealand's fisheries science and management systems under ITQs. ICES Journal of Marine Science [Internet]. 2014 ;71(2):204 - 215. Available from: https://academic.oup.com/icesjms/article/71/2/204/789449/The-evolution-of-New-Zealand-s-fisheries-science
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

New Zealand implemented a comprehensive management system using individual transferable quotas in 1986 that has been instrumental in guiding the roles, responsibilities, and accountabilities of fisheries science, fisheries management, and the fishing industry ever since. However, at the time of the initial design, a number of issues were not adequately considered. These relate mainly to the dynamic nature of fish stocks, multispecies considerations, and environmental and other externalities. Subsequent efforts to address these issues have been challenging and many are not yet fully resolved. The outcomes for fisheries science, stock status, multispecies management, ecosystem effects, and fishing industry accountability have been mixed, although mostly positive. Fisheries science, fisheries management, and the fishing industry have all become much more professionalized and their activities have been increasingly streamlined. New initiatives to further improve the system continue to be researched and implemented. Overall, we believe that the positives considerably outweigh the negatives. The initial design has proved to be a system that can be built upon. Comparing New Zealand with most of the rest of the world, key positive outcomes for preventing overfishing are the current lack of significant overcapacity in most fisheries, the development of biological reference points and a harvest strategy standard, the favourable stock status for the majority of stocks with known status, and the development and implementation of comprehensive risk assessments and management plans to protect seabirds and marine mammals.

Coming to the table: Early stakeholder engagement in marine spatial planning

Gopnik M, Fieseler C, Cantral L, McClellan K, Pendleton L, Crowder L. Coming to the table: Early stakeholder engagement in marine spatial planning. Marine Policy [Internet]. 2012 ;36(5):1139 - 1149. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X1200019X
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

From 2009 to 2011, marine spatial planning (MSP) rapidly gained visibility in the United States as a promising ocean management tool. A few small-scale planning efforts were completed in state waters, and the Obama Administration proposed a framework for large-scale regional MSP throughout the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone. During that same time period, the authors engaged a variety of U.S ocean stakeholders in a series of dialogs with several goals: to share information about what MSP is or could be, to hear stakeholder views and concerns about MSP, and to foster better understanding between those who depend on ocean resources for their livelihood and ocean conservation advocates. The stakeholder meetings were supplemented with several rounds of in-depth interviews and a survey. Despite some predictable areas of conflict, project participants agreed on a number of issues related to stakeholder engagement in MSP: all felt strongly that government planners need to engage outsiders earlier, more often, more meaningfully, and through an open and transparent process. Equally important, the project affirmed the value of bringing unlike parties together at the earliest opportunity to learn, talk, and listen to others with whom they rarely engage.

Stakeholder Involvement in MSP

Pentz T-A. Stakeholder Involvement in MSP. BaltSeaPlan; 2012. Available from: http://www.baltseaplan.eu/
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Report

There is surprisingly little information available on stakeholder management in the evolving and dynamic field of Maritime Spatial Planning (MSP). Based on the experiences made during the pilot planning processes in the framework of the BaltSeaPlan project (2009-­-2012) this report provides recommendations and information about the reasons and rationales for stakeholder involvement in maritime spatial planning, formal and informal approaches to stakeholder involvement in maritime spatial planning, the distinctions of stakeholder involvement in maritime spatial planning, stakeholder identification and stakeholder typologyin maritime spatial planning and Tools, techniques and the right timing to interact with stakeholders.

Beyond traditional stakeholder engagement: Public participation roles in California's statewide marine protected area planning process

Sayce K, Shuman C, Connor D, Reisewitz A, Pope E, Miller-Henson M, Poncelet E, Monié D, Owens B. Beyond traditional stakeholder engagement: Public participation roles in California's statewide marine protected area planning process. Ocean & Coastal Management [Internet]. 2013 ;74:57 - 66. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0964569112002062
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

Public participation was one of the hallmarks of the California Marine Life Protection Act (MLPA) Initiative, a planning process to support the redesign of California's system of marine protected areas (MPAs). The MLPA Initiative implemented innovative and unconventional public outreach and engagement strategies to assist local communities share relevant knowledge and data, and provide timely and targeted contributions to MPA planning discussions. This collaborative model helped broaden traditional forms of participation to ensure public input received and integrated into MPA planning legitimately reflected the interests and priorities of California's coastal communities. A number of considerations were critical to the success of this collaborative approach, including: understanding the needs and limitations of public audiences; working directly with communities to identify appropriate outreach and engagement strategies; prioritizing strategies that supported a multi-directional exchange of information; adapting strategies based on public feedback and internal lessons learned; and hiring professional public engagement specialists. Strategies evolved over time and increased the level and quality of public participation over this multi-stage planning process. Experiences gained from the MLPA Initiative can be used to encourage consideration of collaborative participation in other environmental planning and decision-making processes.

Stakeholder Engagement: Participatory Approaches for the Planning and Development of Marine Protected Areas

Walton A, Gomei M, Di Carlo G. Stakeholder Engagement: Participatory Approaches for the Planning and Development of Marine Protected Areas. World Wide Fund for Nature and NOAA—National Marine Sanctuary Program; 2013 p. 36 pp.
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Report

Stakeholder engagement in Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) can be described as a process of maturity from initial stages to more developed and self-sustaining stages. At early stages, practitioners may consult stakeholder communities as they plan, designate and implement an MPA. As the MPA development process evolves, stakeholders take a more active role, reaching consensus on MPA structure and management, and then perhaps negotiating with MPA managers to ensure their specific goals and values are represented. At full maturity, MPAs may share authority between their management body and stakeholders, or even transfer authority completely to local communities, with the MPA management authority only providing advice and consultation.

It is critical to note that the participatory engagement of stakeholders is perhaps the most important component of the planning and development of an MPA. Meaningful engagement depends on the ability of practitioners to build a healthy, lasting, and trustful relationship with stakeholders, including local communities. The approaches described in this guidebook are intended to help practitioners navigate this process of stakeholder engagement.

A series of five steps as shown in the figure below have been developed in workshops and training sessions over several years: Understanding and engaging stakeholders; Getting started with stakeholders; Participatory problem solving; Stakeholders as advisors; and Co-management approaches. Each step includes progressively greater participation from stakeholders and increasingly more shared responsibility with the MPA management authority.

At each step toward increased stakeholder engagement maturity, different techniques will be required. Some techniques and/or tools may be more useful at some stages of the MPA process than others. For example, creating an advisory body or engaging in a cooperative management approach will probably not be important to focus on in the beginning stages, when a MPA manager is just beginning to work with stakeholders. At these early stages, it is more important to focus on building trust and engaging stakeholders. However, it is good to keep in mind that advisory bodies and cooperative management will become useful in the later steps of MPA development. MPA practitioners should be able to quickly reference those tools that are most useful at each step of the MPA process.

This guidebook does not provide complete details about the steps and techniques listed; those are provided in many other documents. Instead, this serves as a helpful guide for practitioners who need guidance on the steps and techniques for engaging stakeholders in MPA management.

Design or pragmatic evolution: applying ITQs in EU fisheries management

van Hoof L. Design or pragmatic evolution: applying ITQs in EU fisheries management. ICES Journal of Marine Science [Internet]. 2013 ;70(2):462 - 470. Available from: https://academic.oup.com/icesjms/article/70/2/462/797111/Design-or-pragmatic-evolution-applying-ITQs-in-EU
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Among the proposals for the 2012 revision of the EU Common Fisheries Policy, a strong case is made for the introduction of a system of rights-based management. The EU perceives individual fishing concessions as an important instrument for capacity management. We will use the introduction of individual tradable quotas in the management of the Dutch North Sea beam trawl fisheries as a case for exploring the effect of the introduction of such an instrument. The effect will be assessed in terms of reduction of fishing capacity in the Dutch beam trawl fleet and its economic and social impact. These Dutch experiences will be translated to the current debate on the reform of the EU Common Fisheries Policy. Especially, we will focus on the issues of "relative stability", the concentration of rights, and the effects on the small-scale fisheries sector. Some of the negative effects associated with individual tradable rights can be addressed through design. However, trying to maintain stability and counter perceived negative impacts on fishing communities will modify the effect of introducing individual fishing concessions.

Does 'race to fish' behaviour emerge in an individual transferable quota fishery when the total allowable catch becomes non-binding?

Emery TJ, Hartmann K, Green BS, Gardner C, Tisdell J. Does 'race to fish' behaviour emerge in an individual transferable quota fishery when the total allowable catch becomes non-binding?. Fish and Fisheries [Internet]. 2014 ;15(1):151 - 169. Available from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/faf.12015/full
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $38.00
Type: Journal Article

Successful individual transferable quota (ITQ) management requires a binding (constraining) total allowable catch (TAC). A non-binding TAC may result in a shift back towards open access conditions, where fishers increasingly compete (‘race’) to catch their share of the total harvest. This process was examined by comparing fishing fleet behaviour and profitability in the Tasmanian southern rock lobster (Jasus edwardsii) fishery (TSRLF), Australia. Between 2008 and 2010, the TSRLF had a non-binding TAC and effectively reverted to a regulated, limited-entry fishery. Fishers' uncertainty about future profitability and their ability to take their allocated catch weakened the security characteristic of the ITQ allocation. The low quota lease price contributed to an increase in fleet capacity, while the more limited reduction in quota asset value proved an investment barrier, hindering the autonomous adjustment of quota towards the most efficient fishers. In the TSRLF, catch rates vary more than beach price and are therefore more important for determining daily revenue (i.e., price x catch rate) than market price. Consequently, fishers concentrated effort during times of higher catch rates rather than high market demand. This increased rent dissipation as fishers engaged in competitive race to fish to be the first to exploit the stock and obtain higher catch rates. The history of this fishery emphasizes the need for a constraining TAC in all ITQ fisheries, not only for stock management, but also to manage the security of the ITQ allocation and prevent unanticipated and undesirable changes in fisher behaviour and fishery profitability.

Caught in the Same Net? Small-Scale Fishermen's Perceptions of Fisheries Interactions with Sea Turtles and Other Protected Species

Panagopoulou A, Meletis ZA, Margaritoulis D, Spotila JR. Caught in the Same Net? Small-Scale Fishermen's Perceptions of Fisheries Interactions with Sea Turtles and Other Protected Species. Frontiers in Marine Science [Internet]. 2017 ;4. Available from: http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fmars.2017.00180/full
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Small-scale fisheries are responsible for high numbers of animals caught as bycatch, such as turtles, cetaceans, and seals. Bycatch and its associated mortality is a major conservation challenge for these species and is considered undesirable by fishermen. To gain insights on the impact of bycatch on small-scale fishermen and put it in context with other financial and environmental challenges they face, we conducted questionnaire-based interviews on fishermen working on Crete, Greece. We investigated fishermen's perceptions of sea turtle and other protected species interactions, and the impacts of such interactions on their profession and livelihoods. Our results indicate a connection between declining fish stocks, related increased fishing effort, and reported increased frequency of interactions between fishermen and sea turtles. Respondents believed that their livelihoods were endangered by industrial fishing and environmental problems, but thought that combined interactions with turtles and other marine megafauna species were a larger problem. Responses suggested that extending compensation to fishermen may be a good conservation intervention. Small-scale fishermen hold a wealth of knowledge about the marine environment and its resources. This may be of help to researchers and policy makers as it could be used to achieve a better managed, sustainable fishery. Including small-scale fishermen in the process of developing regulations will both enhance those regulations and increase compliance with them.

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