Freely-available Literature

Currently indexing 3069 freely-available titles

The following titles are freely-available, or include a link to a preprint or postprint.

The interaction triangle as a tool for understanding stakeholder interactions in marine ecosystem based management

Röckmann C, van Leeuwen J, Goldsborough D, Kraan M, Piet G. The interaction triangle as a tool for understanding stakeholder interactions in marine ecosystem based management. Marine Policy [Internet]. 2015 ;52:155 - 162. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X14002814
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Expectations about ecosystem based management (EBM) differ due to diverging perspectives about what EBM should be and how it should work. While EBM by its nature requires trade-offs to be made between ecological, economic and social sustainability criteria, the diversity of cross-sectoral perspectives, values, stakes, and the specificity of each individual situation determine the outcome of these trade-offs. The authors strive to raise awareness of the importance of interaction between three stakeholder groups (decision makers, scientists, and other actors) and argue that choosing appropriate degrees of interaction between them in a transparent way can make EBM more effective in terms of the three effectiveness criteria salience, legitimacy, and credibility. This article therefore presents an interaction triangle in which three crucial dimensions of stakeholder interactions are discussed: (A) between decision makers and scientists, who engage in framing to foster salience of scientific input to decision making, (B) between decision makers and other actors, to shape participation processes to foster legitimacy of EBM processes, and (C) between scientists and other actors, who collaborate to foster credibility of knowledge production. Due to the complexity of EBM, there is not one optimal interaction approach; rather, finding the optimal degrees of interaction for each dimension depends on the context in which EBM is implemented, i.e. the EBM objectives, the EBM initiator’s willingness for transparency and interaction, and other context-specific factors, such as resources, trust, and state of knowledge.

The Role of Mangroves in Fisheries Enhancement

Hutchison J, Spalding M, Ermgassen Pzu. The Role of Mangroves in Fisheries Enhancement. The Nature Conservancy and Wetlands International; 2014 p. 54. Available from: http://www.wetlands.org/WatchRead/Currentpublications/tabid/56/mod/1570/articleType/ArticleView/articleId/3656/Default.aspx
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Report

In 2011 humans caught and consumed 78.9 million tonnes of fish, crustaceans, molluscs and other species groups from the world’s oceans, accounting for 16.6% of the world’s animal protein intake (FAO 2012). This is projected to increase further, to over 93 million tonnes by 2030 (World Bank 2013). Global demand for fish products has increased dramatically over recent decades. Fishing is also an important livelihood, globally providing employment to 38.4 million people of whom 90% are employed in small-scale fisheries (FAO 2012). The importance of fisheries continues to rise as coastal populations are increasing, and rapidly growing economies are driving up demand for fish. While aquaculture is increasing to meet some of this demand, wild capture fisheries continue to be critically important.

This review of the scientific literature provides a deep exploration of the importance of mangroves for wild capture fisheries. While mangroves are widely recognized for their role in enhancing both small scale and commercial fisheries, they are rapidly disappearing. A fuller understanding of this ecosystem service and its value in both social and economic terms will help enhance the sustainable management of both mangroves and fisheries.

The report firstly discusses some of the ecological processes which underpin the key role of mangroves in fisheries enhancement, followed by an exploration of the different mangrove- associated fishery types. As the fisheries value of mangroves is highly site specific, the report explores the drivers and mechanisms which can help to explain for different locations how many fish a mangrove produces, how many are caught by humans, and what the fisheries value is, both in economic terms, as a food supply or through the livelihoods that they support. Decision-makers can use this information to determine where fish productivity is highest, which allows them to make adequate decisions relating to conservation and restoration actions and sustainable fishing. We conclude with management recommendations for maintaining or enhancing the value of mangroves for fisheries for the long-term.

Mangroves for coastal defence: Guidelines for coastal managers & policy makers

Spalding M, McIvor A, Tonneijck F, Tol S, van Eijk P. Mangroves for coastal defence: Guidelines for coastal managers & policy makers. Wetlands International and The Nature Conservancy; 2014 p. 42. Available from: http://www.wetlands.org/News/tabid/66/ID/3956/PRESS-RELEASE-Mangroves-Provide-Measurable-Risk-Reduction-Benefit-to-Coastal-Communities-from-Storm-Waves-and-Flooding.aspx
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Report

The role of mangroves in protecting our coasts against natural hazards such as storms, tsunamis and coastal erosion has been widely promoted. But the supposed coastal protection services of mangroves have also been subject to debate. The Nature Conservancy and Wetlands International together with the University of Cambridge set out to map the current state of knowledge about the role of mangroves in coastal defence and put the different findings and views in perspective. The conclusion is that mangroves can indeed reduce the risk from a large number of hazards. This practical guidebook summarises the findings of the reviews and provides practical management recommendations to coastal zone managers and policymakers. These are the key messages:

Section 1. Is my shore at risk?

Section 2. The role of mangroves in coastal risk reduction

Section 3. Managing mangroves for coastal defence

Section 4. Recognizing the multiple values of mangroves

The ecological significance of giant clams in coral reef ecosystems

Neo MLin, Eckman W, Vicentuan K, Teo SL-M, Todd PA. The ecological significance of giant clams in coral reef ecosystems. Biological Conservation [Internet]. 2015 ;181:111 - 123. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006320714004212
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Giant clams (Hippopus and Tridacna species) are thought to play various ecological roles in coral reef ecosystems, but most of these have not previously been quantified. Using data from the literature and our own studies we elucidate the ecological functions of giant clams. We show how their tissues are food for a wide array of predators and scavengers, while their discharges of live zooxanthellae, faeces, and gametes are eaten by opportunistic feeders. The shells of giant clams provide substrate for colonization by epibionts, while commensal and ectoparasitic organisms live within their mantle cavities. Giant clams increase the topographic heterogeneity of the reef, act as reservoirs of zooxanthellae (Symbiodinium spp.), and also potentially counteract eutrophication via water filtering. Finally, dense populations of giant clams produce large quantities of calcium carbonate shell material that are eventually incorporated into the reef framework. Unfortunately, giant clams are under great pressure from overfishing and extirpations are likely to be detrimental to coral reefs. A greater understanding of the numerous contributions giant clams provide will reinforce the case for their conservation.

A global map to aid the identification and screening of critical habitat for marine industries

Martin CS, Tolley MJ, Farmer E, Mcowen CJ, Geffert JL, Scharlemann JPW, Thomas HL, van Bochove JH, Stanwell-Smith D, Hutton JM, et al. A global map to aid the identification and screening of critical habitat for marine industries. Marine Policy [Internet]. 2015 ;53:45 - 53. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X14002991
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Marine industries face a number of risks that necessitate careful analysis prior to making decisions on the siting of operations and facilities. An important emerging regulatory framework on environmental sustainability for business operations is the International Finance Corporation’s Performance Standard 6 (IFC PS6). Within PS6, identification of biodiversity significance is articulated through the concept of “Critical Habitat”, a definition developed by the IFC and detailed through criteria aligned with those that support internationally accepted biodiversity designations. No publicly available tools have been developed in either the marine or terrestrial realm to assess the likelihood of sites or operations being located within PS6-defined Critical Habitat. This paper presents a starting point towards filling this gap in the form of a preliminary global map that classifies more than 13 million km2 of marine and coastal areas of importance for biodiversity (protected areas, Key Biodiversity Areas [KBA], sea turtle nesting sites, cold- and warm-water corals, seamounts, seagrass beds, mangroves, saltmarshes, hydrothermal vents and cold seeps) based on their overlap with Critical Habitat criteria, as defined by IFC. In total, 5798×103 km2 (1.6%) of the analysis area (global ocean plus coastal land strip) were classed as Likely Critical Habitat, and 7526×103 km2 (2.1%) as Potential Critical Habitat; the remainder (96.3%) were Unclassified. The latter was primarily due to the paucity of biodiversity data in marine areas beyond national jurisdiction and/or in deep waters, and the comparatively fewer protected areas and KBAs in these regions. Globally, protected areas constituted 65.9% of the combined Likely and Potential Critical Habitat extent, and KBAs 29.3%, not accounting for the overlap between these two features. Relative Critical Habitat extent in Exclusive Economic Zones varied dramatically between countries. This work is likely to be of particular use for industries operating in the marine and coastal realms as an early screening aid prior to in situ Critical Habitat assessment; to financial institutions making investment decisions; and to those wishing to implement good practice policies relevant to biodiversity management. Supplementary material (available online) includes other global datasets considered, documentation and justification of biodiversity feature classification, detail of IFC PS6 criteria/scenarios, and coverage calculations.

Ornamental Marine Species Culture in the Coral Triangle: Seahorse Demonstration Project in the Spermonde Islands, Sulawesi, Indonesia

Williams SL, Janetski N, Abbott J, Blankenhorn S, Cheng B, R. Crafton E, Hameed SO, Rapi S, Trockel D. Ornamental Marine Species Culture in the Coral Triangle: Seahorse Demonstration Project in the Spermonde Islands, Sulawesi, Indonesia. Environmental Management [Internet]. 2014 ;54(6):1342 - 1355. Available from: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00267-014-0343-6
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Ornamental marine species (‘OMS’) provide valuable income for developing nations in the Indo-Pacific Coral Triangle, from which most of the specimens are exported. OMS culture can help diversify livelihoods in the region, in support of management and conservation efforts to reduce destructive fishing and collection practices that threaten coral reef and seagrass ecosystems. Adoption of OMS culture depends on demonstrating its success as a livelihood, yet few studies of OMS culture exist in the region. We present a case study of a land-based culture project for an endangered seahorse (Hippocampus barbouri) in the Spermonde Islands, Sulawesi, Indonesia. The business model demonstrated that culturing can increase family income by seven times. A Strengths Weaknesses Opportunities Threats (SWOT) analysis indicated good collaboration among diverse stakeholders and opportunities for culturing non-endangered species and for offshoot projects, but complicated permitting was an issue as were threats of market flooding and production declines. The OMS international market is strong, Indonesian exporters expressed great interest in cultured product, and Indonesia is the largest exporting country for H. barbouri. Yet, a comparison of Indonesia ornamental marine fish exports to fish abundance in a single local market indicated that OMS culture cannot replace fishing livelihoods. Nevertheless, seahorse and other OMS culture can play a role in management and conservation by supplementing and diversifying the fishing and collecting livelihoods in the developing nations that provide the majority of the global OMS.

Life history variation in Barents Sea fish: implications for sensitivity to fishing in a changing environment

Wiedmann MA, Primicerio R, Dolgov A, Ottesen CAM, Aschan M. Life history variation in Barents Sea fish: implications for sensitivity to fishing in a changing environment. Ecology and Evolution [Internet]. 2014 ;4(18):3596 - 3611. Available from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ece3.1203/abstract
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Under exploitation and environmental change, it is essential to assess the sensitivity and vulnerability of marine ecosystems to such stress. A species' response to stress depends on its life history. Sensitivity to harvesting is related to the life history “fast–slow” continuum, where “slow” species (i.e., large, long lived, and late maturing) are expected to be more sensitive to fishing than “fast” ones. We analyze life history traits variation for all common fish species in the Barents Sea and rank fishes along fast–slow gradients obtained by ordination analyses. In addition, we integrate species' fast–slow ranks with ecosystem survey data for the period 2004–2009, to assess life history variation at the community level in space and time. Arctic fishes were smaller, had shorter life spans, earlier maturation, larger offspring, and lower fecundity than boreal ones. Arctic fishes could thus be considered faster than the boreal species, even when body size was corrected for. Phylogenetically related species possessed similar life histories. Early in the study period, we found a strong spatial gradient, where members of fish assemblages in the southwestern Barents Sea displayed slower life histories than in the northeast. However, in later, warmer years, the gradient weakened caused by a northward movement of boreal species. As a consequence, the northeast experienced increasing proportions of slower fish species. This study is a step toward integrating life history traits in ecosystem-based areal management. On the basis of life history traits, we assess the fish sensitivity to fishing, at the species and community level. We show that climate warming promotes a borealization of fish assemblages in the northeast, associated with slower life histories in that area. The biology of Arctic species is still poorly known, and boreal species that now establish in the Arctic are fishery sensitive, which calls for cautious ecosystem management of these areas.

Spawning aggregation behavior and reproductive ecology of the giant bumphead parrotfish, Bolbometopon muricatum, in a remote marine reserve

Muñoz RC, Zgliczynski BJ, Teer BZ, Laughlin JL. Spawning aggregation behavior and reproductive ecology of the giant bumphead parrotfish, Bolbometopon muricatum, in a remote marine reserve. PeerJ [Internet]. 2014 ;2(e681). Available from: https://peerj.com/articles/681/
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The giant bumphead parrotfish (Bolbometopon muricatum) has experienced precipitous population declines throughout its range due to its importance as a highly-prized fishery target and cultural resource. Because of its diet, Bolbometopon may serve as a keystone species on Indo-Pacific coral reefs, yet comprehensive descriptions of its reproductive ecology do not exist. We used a variety of underwater visual census (UVC) methods to study an intact population of Bolbometopon at Wake Atoll, a remote and protected coral atoll in the west Pacific. Key observations include spawning activities in the morning around the full and last quarter moon, with possible spawning extending to the new moon. We observed peaks in aggregation size just prior to and following the full and last quarter moon, respectively, and observed a distinct break in spawning at the site that persisted for four days; individuals returned to the aggregation site one day prior to the last quarter moon and resumed spawning the following day. The mating system was lek-based, characterized by early male arrival at the spawning site followed by vigorous defense (including head-butting between large males) of small territories. These territories were apparently used to attract females that arrived later in large schools, causing substantial changes in the sex ratio on the aggregation site at any given time during the morning spawning period. Aggression between males and courtship of females led to pair spawning within the upper water column. Mating interference was not witnessed but we noted instances suggesting that sperm competition might occur. Densities of Bolbometopon on the aggregation site averaged 10.07(±3.24 SE) fish per hectare (ha) with maximum densities of 51.5 fish per ha. By comparing our observations to the results of biennial surveys conducted by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), we confirmed spatial consistency of the aggregation across years as well as a temporal break in spawning activity and aggregation that occurred during the lunar phase. We estimated the area encompassed by the spawning aggregation to be 0.72 ha, suggesting that spawning site closures and temporal closures centered around the full to the new moon might form one component of a management and conservation plan for this species. Our study of the mating system and spawning aggregation behavior of Bolbometopon from the protected, relatively pristine population at Wake Atoll provides crucial baselines of population density, sex ratio composition, and productivity of a spawning aggregation site from an oceanic atoll. Such information is key for conservation efforts and provides a basic platform for the design of marine protected areas for this threatened iconic coral reef fish, as well as for species with similar ecological and life history characteristics.

Operationalizing and Leveraging an Ecosystem Services Framework for Habitat Conservation: Coastal Blue Carbon

Sutton-Grier A. Operationalizing and Leveraging an Ecosystem Services Framework for Habitat Conservation: Coastal Blue Carbon. Durham, NC: National Ecosystem Services Partnership, Duke University; 2014 p. 13. Available from: https://nespguidebook.com/
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Report

Describes NOAA’s efforts to support the scientific, policy, and economic framework needed to increase use of information on coastal wetland’s carbon sequestration potential in coastal management.

A Heuristic Framework for Evaluating Ecosystem Services in Coastal and Marine Environments: Marine InVEST

Plummer M, Effron M, Townsend H. A Heuristic Framework for Evaluating Ecosystem Services in Coastal and Marine Environments: Marine InVEST. Durham, NC: National Ecosystem Services Partnership, Duke University; 2014 p. 14. Available from: https://nespguidebook.com/
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Report

Many scientific diagnoses of declining marine species and habitats and of recreational use patterns along U.S. coasts point to upland and freshwater sources of imperilment. A growing number of scientists argue that the best hope for protecting marine resources for multiple uses is to consider larger-scale processes, including activities that take place on land, when designing management strategies. But how inclusion of land- and water-use practices in strategies to sustain coastal marine resources affects management outcomes is poorly understood. The goal of this research is to assess the importance of including these practices in the management of coastal marine resources, using an ecosystem services framework. An ecosystem services framework provides a clear and novel path forward—one that integrates ecological processes with socioeconomic behavior and values.

The specific objectives of the research are to develop a set of linked watershed-marine models with ecosystem service outputs to evaluate management strategies for coastal resources and to apply those models to three case studies: Puget Sound, Galveston Bay, and Chesapeake Bay. In each case, we compare the strength and influence of watershed activities on key ecosystem services and ask how outcomes of marine resource management strategies are affected by including coastal watershed processes. We also explore a limited set of climate change scenarios. We estimate ecosystem services and their values using production function approaches, focusing on how changes in system function driven by land use management and climate change lead to changes in the provisioning of food from selected fisheries. Future work may extend this analysis to aquaculture, recreation, and coastal protection.

Modelling the Spatial Behaviour of a Tropical Tuna Purse Seine Fleet

Davies TK, Mees CC, Milner-Gulland EJ. Modelling the Spatial Behaviour of a Tropical Tuna Purse Seine Fleet Hazen ELee. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2014 ;9(12):e114037. Available from: http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0114037
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Industrial tuna fisheries operate in the Indian, Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, but concerns over sustainability and environmental impacts of these fisheries have resulted in increased scrutiny of how they are managed. An important but often overlooked factor in the success or failure of tuna fisheries management is the behaviour of fishers and fishing fleets. Uncertainty in how a fishing fleet will respond to management or other influences can be reduced by anticipating fleet behaviour, although to date there has been little research directed at understanding and anticipating the human dimension of tuna fisheries. The aim of this study was to address gaps in knowledge of the behaviour of tuna fleets, using the Indian Ocean tropical tuna purse seine fishery as a case study. We use statistical modelling to examine the factors that influence the spatial behaviour of the purse seine fleet at broad spatiotemporal scales. This analysis reveals very high consistency between years in the use of seasonal fishing grounds by the fleet, as well as a forcing influence of biophysical ocean conditions on the distribution of fishing effort. These findings suggest strong inertia in the spatial behaviour of the fleet, which has important implications for predicting the response of the fleet to natural events or management measures (e.g., spatial closures).

A Spatial Modeling Approach to Predicting the Secondary Spread of Invasive Species Due to Ballast Water Discharge

Sieracki JL, Bossenbroek JM, W. Chadderton L. A Spatial Modeling Approach to Predicting the Secondary Spread of Invasive Species Due to Ballast Water Discharge McKindsey CW. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2014 ;9(12):e114217. Available from: http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0114217
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Ballast water in ships is an important contributor to the secondary spread of invasive species in the Laurentian Great Lakes. Here, we use a model previously created to determine the role ballast water management has played in the secondary spread of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) to identify the future spread of one current and two potential invasive species in the Great Lakes, the Eurasian Ruffe (Gymnocephalus cernuus), killer shrimp (Dikerogammarus villosus), and golden mussel (Limnoperna fortunei), respectively. Model predictions for Eurasian Ruffe have been used to direct surveillance efforts within the Great Lakes and DNA evidence of ruffe presence was recently reported from one of three high risk port localities identified by our model. Predictions made for killer shrimp and golden mussel suggest that these two species have the potential to become rapidly widespread if introduced to the Great Lakes, reinforcing the need for proactive ballast water management. The model used here is flexible enough to be applied to any species capable of being spread by ballast water in marine or freshwater ecosystems.

The World's Most Isolated and Distinct Whale Population? Humpback Whales of the Arabian Sea

Pomilla C, Amaral AR, Collins T, Minton G, Findlay K, Leslie MS, Ponnampalam L, Baldwin R, Rosenbaum H. The World's Most Isolated and Distinct Whale Population? Humpback Whales of the Arabian Sea Rogers S. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2014 ;9(12):e114162. Available from: http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0114162
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

A clear understanding of population structure is essential for assessing conservation status and implementing management strategies. A small, non-migratory population of humpback whales in the Arabian Sea is classified as “Endangered” on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, an assessment constrained by a lack of data, including limited understanding of its relationship to other populations. We analysed 11 microsatellite markers and mitochondrial DNA sequences extracted from 67 Arabian Sea humpback whale tissue samples and compared them to equivalent datasets from the Southern Hemisphere and North Pacific. Results show that the Arabian Sea population is highly distinct; estimates of gene flow and divergence times suggest a Southern Indian Ocean origin but indicate that it has been isolated for approximately 70,000 years, remarkable for a species that is typically highly migratory. Genetic diversity values are significantly lower than those obtained for Southern Hemisphere populations and signatures of ancient and recent genetic bottlenecks were identified. Our findings suggest this is the world's most isolated humpback whale population, which, when combined with low population abundance estimates and anthropogenic threats, raises concern for its survival. We recommend an amendment of the status of the population to “Critically Endangered” on the IUCN Red List.

A chain of fools: or, why it is so hard to stop overfishing

Boonstra WJ, Österblom H. A chain of fools: or, why it is so hard to stop overfishing. Maritime Studies [Internet]. 2014 ;13(15). Available from: http://www.maritimestudiesjournal.com/content/13/1/15
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

We fish too much, and by doing so, we threaten marine ecosystems and people’s livelihoods. But the curious thing is: we have known this for a long time. Nonetheless, we continue to overfish. How is that possible? Why can we not stop? This paper recounts our search for an answer. We start by giving an overview of how scientists explain overfishing, and suggest that the riddle of its obduracy has not been addressed systematically. We conceptualize overfishing as an unplanned and unintended outcome of a chain of interrelated social and ecological events. We then analyze the chain of events leading to overfishing for two typical cases – the groundfish fishery in the Gulf of Maine and the South African abalone (Haliotis midae, Haliotidae) fishery – and two atypical cases where overfishing has stopped or been substantially reduced – the Patagonian and Antarctic toothfish (Dissostichus eleginoides, Nototheniidae and Dissostichus mawsoni, Nototheniidae) fishery in the Southern Ocean, and the Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua, Gadidae) fishery in the Barents Sea. Studying and comparing these cases reveals no sufficient set of factors to explain the persistence of overfishing. Rather, distinct pathways emerge from a concatenation of proximate and remote factors, leading to and sustaining overfishing. Understanding these pathways and their mechanisms can assist in locating leverage points for intervention aimed to stop overfishing.

Marine protected areas in a welfare-based perspective

Reithe S, Armstrong CW, Flaaten O. Marine protected areas in a welfare-based perspective. Marine Policy [Internet]. 2014 ;49:29 - 36. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X14001134
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Assuming a broad set of fisheries management goals, this paper analyzes the implementation of a marine protected area (MPA) together with open access outside, applying a bioeconomic model that ensures unchanged growth post-MPA. Taking into account that conservation and restoration, food security, employment and social surplus are amongst the objectives that many managers include in fisheries management, it is found that this broader welfare economic approach to MPAs may well recommend them to a greater degree than espoused in the more common resource rent focused studies carried out to date. It is shown that for overfished stocks, an MPA may yield resource protection, maximize harvests and increase consumer and producer surplus, as well as give higher employment. This, however, is less apparent for moderately overfished as well as highly migratory stocks. Resource protection and enhancement implicitly improves ecosystem services.

Cetacean manual for MPA managers

Franzosini C, Genov T, Tempesta M. Cetacean manual for MPA managers. ACCOBAMS, MedPAN and UNEP/MAP-RAC/SPA; 2013 p. 77. Available from: http://rac-spa.org/node/1081
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Report

The MedMPAnet Project collaborated recently with MedPAN network and ACCOBAMS permanent secretariat in the publication of a new technical tool designed for MPA managers and dealing with the best practices for protecting cetaceans in the ACCOBAMS area.

The cetacean manual for MPA managers, published in October 2013, provides a comprehensive overview of the main cetaceans species regularly present in the ACCOBAMS area  and reviews the following subjects:

  • The monitoring of cetaceans  populations in MPAs,
  • The existing data and networks for cetaceans,
  • The administrative and scientific guidelines to deal with dead and live stranding,
  • The sustainable whale watching and volunteering activities,
  • other socio-economic aspects.

Sub-regionalisation of fisheries governance: the case of the Western and Central Pacific Ocean tuna fisheries

Miller AMM, Bush SR, van Zwieten PAM. Sub-regionalisation of fisheries governance: the case of the Western and Central Pacific Ocean tuna fisheries. Maritime Studies [Internet]. 2014 ;13(17). Available from: http://www.maritimestudiesjournal.com/content/13/1/17
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Shifting political alliances and new environmental challenges are prompting debate over processes of sub-regionalisation and whether the interplay between multiple scales of governance leads to positive synergistic outcomes or negative institutional disruption. Regional management of tuna fisheries in the Western and Central Pacific Ocean is an example where a web of treaties, conventions and institutional frameworks underlie international cooperation. Through examining the interplay between the regional Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission and sub-regional Parties to the Nauru Agreement, this paper explores the extent to which the PNA and WCPFC interact in the management of regional tuna fisheries. The results demonstrate that for contested marine resources such as fisheries, international sub-regions can go beyond functional units to also present wider opportunities to shift power relations in favour of small island states. Additionally, the presence of sub-regional groups like the PNA has served to challenge the performance of the WCPFC, stimulating greater debate and progress within the regional body. The paper concludes that the combined work of the PNA and the WCPFC puts them ahead on many issues and may represent a testing ground for a functional multilateralism utilising both regional and sub-regional governance platforms for the management of shared resources.

The importance of place: Unraveling the vulnerability of fisherman livelihoods to the impact of marine protected areas

Chen C, Lopez-Carr D. The importance of place: Unraveling the vulnerability of fisherman livelihoods to the impact of marine protected areas. Applied Geography [Internet]. 2015 . Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0143622814002525
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

Marine protected areas (MPAs) hold great promise as an effective conservation tool, but the potential negative socioeconomic impacts of MPAs remain poorly understood. Indeed, little work has been done to advance the frameworks and methods needed to assess, measure, and communicate the potential negative socioeconomic impact of MPAs and incorporate this information in MPA planning and management efforts. To address this gap, we test a vulnerability assessment termed the Livelihood Vulnerability Index (LVI) that is designed to measure the relative potential impact a proposed MPA network may have upon fisherman livelihoods. To test the LVI, specifically we ask, how does the vulnerability of fishermen to the impact of MPAs differ across place? We explore this question through two core areas of inquiry surrounding the study of vulnerability assessments: 1) Ranking and comparing vulnerability and 2) Explaining attributes of vulnerability. Through this study we demonstrate how the historical and current conditions fishermen experience in a given place shape vulnerability levels in various ways. Variability in the attributes of a particular place such as weather conditions, the size of fishing areas, availability of alternative fisheries, and changes in kelp cover contribute inherently as measures of vulnerability but they also shape fishermen perceptions of what are important measures of vulnerability. Secondly, counter to existing notions, the use of weights in vulnerability assessments may not significantly impact vulnerability scores and ranking. Together these findings emphasize the need to test vulnerability assessments against actual experienced impact or harm across geographies and groups of fishermen towards an informed refinement of vulnerability assessments. We emphasize that the particularities of place are critical to understand, to appropriately assess and thus to effectively mitigate vulnerability in order to promote the future well being of fisherman livelihoods.

National, International and EU Legal Instruments Relevant to the Development of a Marine Spatial Planning Framework in Ireland

Slater A-M, Kennedy A, Grist B, Barnes J, Berne S. National, International and EU Legal Instruments Relevant to the Development of a Marine Spatial Planning Framework in Ireland. Oranmore, Co. Galway, Ireland: Marine Institute; 2014 p. 152. Available from: http://www.marine.ie/Home/
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Report

Harnessing Our Ocean Wealth – An Integrated Marine Plan for Ireland (IMP) (2012) set out a 'roadmap' to secure the sustainable development of Ireland’s marine resources. This report is part of a suite of research and initiatives to implement Harnessing Our Ocean Wealth. The study reviewed all international, European and national law relevant for the development of a framework for marine spatial planning (MSP) for Irish waters. The development, implementation and practice of MSP for five key jurisdictions were also considered.

This report details the identification of a range of options for MSP for Ireland and the criteria for testing those options. It explains the process of refining and developing both the options and the criteria in conjunction with the Enablers Task Force (ETF) to form preliminary conclusions. The key provisions in the Marine and Coastal Access Act 2009 and the Marine (Scotland) Act 2010 were compared in order to assist with this process. A final recommendation of a framework for MSP has been identified by the research team, with a working title of the minimal parallel system.The forward planning system, however, more accurately describes it.

The forward planning system (minimal parallel system) proposes the introduction of a marine planning system through primary legislation, which would operate in parallel with the existing terrestrial system. While it would be separate from the land based planning system and policies,theMSPsystemwouldbecoordinatedwiththeterrestrialsystem,asrequired. There would be no change to the marine consenting regime, and initially it would have no role in conservationmanagement. Themainfocusofthelegislationwouldbethestatutory requirement for the preparation of a hierarchy of plans, with a statutory role for the plan in thedecisionmaking/licensingprocess. Themarinespatialplanningsystemwouldimmediately abut the terrestrial planning system at the high water mark and would extend to the limit of thecontinentalshelf. ThehierarchywouldconsistofamandatoryNationalMarineSpatial Strategy (NMSS) aligned to the National Spatial Strategy (NSS). There would be mandatory regional sea basin plans for areas of high pressure use and discretionary regional plans for otherareasandintegratedcoastalzonemanagement(ICZM)planswhererequired. An existing body/ government department or key sections of appropriate bodies/ departments, with the appropriate expertise would be responsible for the preparation of the plans, but could coordinate with regional or local authorities as appropriate, particularly for ICZM plans.

This report is supported by extensive Appendices which detail the research and aspects of the research process.

Review of Marine Spatial Planning Best Practice of Relevance to Ireland

Flannery W. Review of Marine Spatial Planning Best Practice of Relevance to Ireland. Oranmore, Co. Galway, Ireland: Marine Institute; 2013 p. 45. Available from: http://pure.qub.ac.uk/portal/en/publications/review-of-marine-spatial-planning-best-practice-of-relevance-to-ireland%28923d8b6a-6742-4f5c-83d5-2b707157004c%29/export.html
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Yes
Summary available?: 
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Type: Report

Making room for new marine uses and safeguarding more traditional uses, without degrading the marine environment, will require the adoption of new integrated management strategies. Current management frameworks do not facilitate the integrated management of all marine activities occurring in one area. To address this issue, the government developed Harnessing Our Ocean Wealth – An Integrated Marine Plan (IMP) for Ireland. Harnessing Our Ocean Wealth presents a ‘roadmap’ for adopting an integrated approach to marine governance and for achieving the Government’s ambitious targets for the maritime sector, including: exceeding €6.4 billion turnover annually by 2020, and doubling its contribution to GDP to 2.4% by 2030. As part of this roadmap, Harnessing Our Ocean Wealth endorses the development of an appropriate Marine Spatial Planning (MSP) Framework. One way to develop an MSP Framework is to learn from early adapters. Critical assessments of key elements of MSP as implemented in early initiatives can serve to inform the development of an appropriate framework.

The aim of this project is to contribute to the development of this framework by reporting on MSP best practice relevant to Ireland. Case study selection and evaluation criteria are outlined in the next section. This is followed by a presentation of case study findings. The final section of the report focuses on outlining how the lessons could be transferred to the Irish context.

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