Freely-available Literature

Currently indexing 4386 freely-available titles

The following titles are freely-available, or include a link to a preprint or postprint.

Molecular Traits of Dissolved Organic Matter in the Subterranean Estuary of a High-Energy Beach: Indications of Sources and Sinks

Waska H, Simon H, Ahmerkamp S, Greskowiak J, Ahrens J, Seibert SL, Schwalfenberg K, Zielinski O, Dittmar T. Molecular Traits of Dissolved Organic Matter in the Subterranean Estuary of a High-Energy Beach: Indications of Sources and Sinks. Frontiers in Marine Science [Internet]. 2021 ;8. Available from: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2021.607083/full?utm_source=F-AAE&utm_medium=EMLF&utm_campaign=MRK_1554790_45_Marine_20210216_arts_A
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Advective flows of seawater and fresh groundwater through coastal aquifers form a unique ecohydrological interface, the subterranean estuary (STE). Here, freshly produced marine organic matter and oxygen mix with groundwater, which is low in oxygen and contains aged organic carbon (OC) from terrestrial sources. Along the groundwater flow paths, dissolved organic matter (DOM) is degraded and inorganic electron acceptors are successively used up. Because of the different DOM sources and ages, exact degradation pathways are often difficult to disentangle, especially in high-energy environments with dynamic changes in beach morphology, source composition, and hydraulic gradients. From a case study site on a barrier island in the German North Sea, we present detailed biogeochemical data from freshwater lens groundwater, seawater, and beach porewater samples collected over different seasons. The samples were analyzed for physico-chemistry (e.g., salinity, temperature, dissolved silicate), (reduced) electron acceptors (e.g., oxygen, nitrate, and iron), and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). DOM was isolated and molecularly characterized via soft-ionization ultra-high-resolution mass spectrometry, and molecular formulae were identified in each sample. We found that the islands’ freshwater lens harbors a surprisingly high DOM molecular diversity and heterogeneity, possibly due to patchy distributions of buried peat lenses. Furthermore, a comparison of DOM composition of the endmembers indicated that the Spiekeroog high-energy beach STE conveys chemically modified, terrestrial DOM from the inland freshwater lens to the coastal ocean. In the beach intertidal zone, porewater DOC concentrations, lability of DOM and oxygen concentrations, decreased while dissolved (reduced) iron and dissolved silicate concentrations increased. This observation is consistent with the assumption of a continuous degradation of labile DOM along a cross-shore gradient, even in this dynamic environment. Accordingly, molecular properties of DOM indicated enhanced degradation, and “humic-like” fluorescent DOM fraction increased along the flow paths, likely through accumulation of compounds less susceptible to microbial consumption. Our data indicate that the high-energy beach STE is likely a net sink of OC from the terrestrial and marine realm, and that barrier islands such as Spiekeroog may act as efficient “digestors” of organic matter.

Effects of Vessel Distance and Sex on the Behavior of Endangered Killer Whales

Holt MM, Tennessen JB, Ward EJ, M. Hanson B, Emmons CK, Giles DA, Hogan JT. Effects of Vessel Distance and Sex on the Behavior of Endangered Killer Whales. Frontiers in Marine Science [Internet]. 2021 ;7. Available from: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2020.582182/full?utm_source=F-AAE&utm_medium=EMLF&utm_campaign=MRK_1554790_45_Marine_20210216_arts_A
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Current Status of the Algae Production Industry in Europe: An Emerging Sector of the Blue Bioeconomy

Araújo R, Calderón FVázquez, López JSánchez, Azevedo ICosta, Bruhn A, Fluch S, Tasende MGarcia, Ghaderiardakani F, Ilmjärv T, Laurans M, et al. Current Status of the Algae Production Industry in Europe: An Emerging Sector of the Blue Bioeconomy. Frontiers in Marine Science [Internet]. 2021 ;7. Available from: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2020.626389/full?utm_source=F-AAE&utm_medium=EMLF&utm_campaign=MRK_1554790_45_Marine_20210216_arts_A
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Exceptionally high but still growing predatory reef fish biomass after 23 years of protection in a Marine Protected Area

Rojo I, Anadón JDaniel, García-Charton JAntonio. Exceptionally high but still growing predatory reef fish biomass after 23 years of protection in a Marine Protected Area Chapman MGeraldine. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2021 ;16(2):e0246335. Available from: https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0246335
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) help replenish fish assemblages, though different trophic levels may show diverse recovery patterns. Long-term protection is required to achieve total recovery but poaching events may prevent the achievement of full carrying capacity. Here, we have analysed the effect of long-term protection on the entire reef fish community and the different trophic levels in the Cabo de Palos-Islas Hormigas MPA (SE Spain; SW Mediterranean Sea) in order to assess their recovery patterns after 23 years of protection. We compared the values for carrying capacity obtained with the maximum values achieved at regional scale, and we assessed the effect of a reduction in the surveillance over a few years, during which poaching events increased, on the recovery patterns. We found that, overall, biomass of fishes increased with time while density diminished. In particular, piscivorous and macro-invertivore fish increased while the other trophic groups remained constant or declined, suggesting top-down processes. For the entire study period, those trophic groups were approaching carrying capacity; however, when accounting only for the period in which enforcement was high and constant, they grew exponentially, indicating that full carrying capacity may have not been achieved yet. When compared to other Mediterranean MPAs, the Cabo de Palos-Islas Hormigas MPA showed values for biomass that were disproportionately higher, suggesting that local factors, such as habitat structure and associated oceanographic processes, may be responsible for the dynamics found. Our results help to understand the potential trajectories of fish assemblages over a consolidated MPA and highlight empirically how the reduction of surveillance in a period may change the recovery patterns.

Differential impacts of freshwater and marine covariates on wild and hatchery Chinook salmon marine survival

Chasco B, Burke B, Crozier L, Zabel R. Differential impacts of freshwater and marine covariates on wild and hatchery Chinook salmon marine survival Holt CA. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2021 ;16(2):e0246659. Available from: https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0246659
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Large-scale atmospheric conditions in the Northeast Pacific Ocean affect both the freshwater environment in the Columbia River Basin and marine conditions along the coasts of Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia, resulting in correlated conditions in the two environments. For migrating species, such as salmonids that move through multiple habitats, these correlations can amplify the impact of good or poor physical conditions on growth and survival, as movements among habitats may not alleviate effects of anomalous conditions. Unfortunately, identifying the mechanistic drivers of salmon survival in space and time is hindered by these cross-habitat correlations. To address this issue, we modeled the marine survival of Snake River spring/summer Chinook salmon with multiple indices of the marine environment and an explicit treatment of the effect of arrival timing from freshwater to the ocean, and found that both habitats contribute to marine survival rates. We show how this particular carryover effect of freshwater conditions on marine survival varies by year and rearing type (hatchery or wild), with a larger effect for wild fish. As environmental conditions change, incorporating effects from both freshwater and marine habitats into salmon survival models will become more important, and has the additional benefit of highlighting how management actions that affect arrival timing may improve marine survival.

Assessment of a small-scale fishery: Lane Snapper (Lutjanus synagris) using a length metric method

Castillo LSierra, Fujiwara M. Assessment of a small-scale fishery: Lane Snapper (Lutjanus synagris) using a length metric method Maravelias C. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2021 ;16(2):e0233479. Available from: https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0233479
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Small-scale fisheries are hard to assess because of the limited availability of data. Therefore, a method requiring easy-to-obtain catch-data is important for the assessment and management of small-scale fisheries. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of fishing gear selectivity on a length-based metric method proposed by Froese by estimating three indicators using catch-data from Lane Snapper (Lutjanus synagris) collected in Honduras. These indicators are (1) the percentage of mature individuals in the catch, (2) the percentage of fish within the range of estimated optimal lengths to be captured, and (3) the percentage of fish larger than the optimal length. These indicators determine the level of overfishing. The indicators were estimated separately for catch-data corresponding to gill nets, and each indicator was estimated with and without selectivity correction. Selectivity and mesh sizes of the fishing gear had a major impact on the estimation of indicators 1 and 2. As for indicator 3, it consistently showed a high level of exploitation. The three estimated indicators suggested that the Lane Snapper fishery in Honduras is experiencing overfishing. Overall, the method appears to be promising for the assessment of small-scale fisheries, but it should be used cautiously.

Ocean acidification decreases grazing pressure but alters morphological structure in a dominant coastal seaweed

Kinnby A, White JCB, Toth GB, Pavia H. Ocean acidification decreases grazing pressure but alters morphological structure in a dominant coastal seaweed Cornwall CEdward. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2021 ;16(1):e0245017. Available from: https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0245017
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Ocean acidification driven by anthropogenic climate change is causing a global decrease in pH, which is projected to be 0.4 units lower in coastal shallow waters by the year 2100. Previous studies have shown that seaweeds grown under such conditions may alter their growth and photosynthetic capacity. It is not clear how such alterations might impact interactions between seaweed and herbivores, e.g. through changes in feeding rates, nutritional value, or defense levels. Changes in seaweeds are particularly important for coastal food webs, as they are key primary producers and often habitat-forming species. We cultured the habitat-forming brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus for 30 days in projected future pCO2 (1100 μatm) with genetically identical controls in ambient pCO2 (400 μatm). Thereafter the macroalgae were exposed to grazing by Littorina littorea, acclimated to the relevant pCO2-treatment. We found increased growth (measured as surface area increase), decreased tissue strength in a tensile strength test, and decreased chemical defense (phlorotannins) levels in seaweeds exposed to high pCO2-levels. The herbivores exposed to elevated pCO2-levels showed improved condition index, decreased consumption, but no significant change in feeding preference. Fucoid seaweeds such as Fvesiculosus play important ecological roles in coastal habitats and are often foundation species, with a key role for ecosystem structure and function. The change in surface area and associated decrease in breaking force, as demonstrated by our results, indicate that Fvesiculosus grown under elevated levels of pCO2 may acquire an altered morphology and reduced tissue strength. This, together with increased wave energy in coastal ecosystems due to climate change, could have detrimental effects by reducing both habitat and food availability for herbivores.

Three decades of trace element sediment contamination: The mining of governmental databases and the need to address hidden sources for clean and healthy seas

Richir J, Bray S, McAleese T, Watson GJ. Three decades of trace element sediment contamination: The mining of governmental databases and the need to address hidden sources for clean and healthy seas. Environment International [Internet]. 2021 ;149:106362. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160412020323163?dgcid=raven_sd_search_email
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Trace elements (TEs) frequently contaminate coastal marine sediments with many included in priority chemical lists or control legislation. These, improved waste treatment and increased recycling have fostered the belief that TE pollution is declining. Nevertheless, there is a paucity of long-term robust datasets to support this confidence. By mining UK datasets (100s of sites, 31 years), we assess sediment concentrations of arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), mercury (Hg), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) and use indices (PI [Pollution], TEPI [Trace Element Pollution] and Igeo [Geoaccumulation]) to assess TE pollution evolution. PI and TEPI show reductions of overall TE pollution in the 1980s then incremental improvements followed by a distinct increase (2010–13). Zn, As and Pb Igeo scores show low pollution, whilst Cd and Hg are moderate, but with all remaining temporally stable. Igeo scores are low for Ni, Fe and Cr, but increasing for Ni and Fe. A moderate pollution Igeo score for Cu has also steadily increased since the mid-1990s. Increasing site trends are not universal and, conversely, minimal temporal change masks some site-specific increases and decreases. To capture this variability we strongly advocate embedding sufficient sentinel sites within observation networks. Decreasing sediment pollution levels (e.g. Pb and Hg) have been achieved, but stabilizing Igeo and recently increasing TEPI and PI scores require continued global vigilance. Increasing Ni and Fe Igeo scores necessitate source identification, but this is a priority for Cu. Local, regional and world analyses indicate substantial ‘hidden’ inputs from anti-fouling paints (Cu, Zn), ship scrubbers (Cu, Zn, Ni) and sacrificial anodes (Zn) that are also predicted to increase markedly. Accurate TE input assessments and targeted legislation are, therefore, urgently required, especially in the context of rapid blue economic growth (e.g. shipping).

Integrating marine oil snow and MOSSFA into oil spill response and damage assessment

Ross J, Hollander D, Saupe S, Burd AB, Gilbert S, Quigg A. Integrating marine oil snow and MOSSFA into oil spill response and damage assessment. Marine Pollution Bulletin [Internet]. 2021 ;165:112025. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025326X2100059X?dgcid=raven_sd_search_email
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Marine snow formation and vertical transport are naturally occurring processes that carry organic matter from the surface to deeper waters, providing food and sequestering carbon. During the Deepwater Horizon well blowout, oil was incorporated with marine snow aggregates, triggering a Marine Oil Snow (MOS) Sedimentation and Flocculent Accumulation (MOSSFA) event, that transferred a significant percentage of the total released oil to the seafloor. An improved understanding of processes controlling MOS formation and MOSSFA events is necessary for evaluating their impacts on the fate of spilled oil. Numerical models and predictive tools capable of providing scientific support for oil spill planning, response, and Natural Resource Damage Assessment are being developed to provide information for weighing the ecological trade-offs of response options. Here we offer considerations for oil spill response and recovery when assessing the potential for a MOSSFA event and provide tools to enhance decision-making.

Combining offshore wind farms, nature conservation and seafood: Lessons from a Dutch community of practice

Steins NA, Veraart JA, Klostermann JEM, Poelman M. Combining offshore wind farms, nature conservation and seafood: Lessons from a Dutch community of practice. Marine Policy [Internet]. 2021 ;126:104371. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X20310228?dgcid=raven_sd_search_email
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Large-scale development of offshore wind farms implies an increase in marine resource use conflicts. Managing potential impacts on marine ecosystems and on resource access for traditional and prospective users is key. Multi-use scenarios are a solution but are often approached as a 'design question' that can be settled through Marine Spatial Planning. In practice, regulatory, technical and socio-economic factors often hinder multi-use. Overcoming such barriers requires active collaboration between all stakeholders, yet meaningful participation in MSP processes often is a challenge. This paper explores the role of Communities of Practice as a participatory tool for developing multi-use. The Netherlands set up a ‘Community of Practice North Sea’ to stimulate the development of multi-use pilots by bringing interested parties together, sharing experiences and learning from each other in a context of existing and developing spatial and social claims. This development is part of the government's strategy aimed at finding a balance between offshore wind energy development, nature conservation and seafood production. The paper shows that by (partly) decoupling policy from practice and creating a positive learning environment, Communities of Practice have potential as a participatory tool for encouraging cooperation between stakeholders in an informal setting and facilitating a transition towards multi-use of marine resources. The paper proposes ten guidelines for using Communities of Practices as an action-oriented tool for salient multi-use practices.

Evaluating the theoretical and practical linkages between ecosystem-based fisheries management and fisheries co-management

Cucuzza M, Stoll JS, Leslie HM. Evaluating the theoretical and practical linkages between ecosystem-based fisheries management and fisheries co-management. Marine Policy [Internet]. 2021 ;126:104390. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X20310411?dgcid=raven_sd_search_email
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Ecosystem-based fisheries management (EBFM) is increasingly recognized as the future of fisheries conservation and stewardship, appearing prominently in policy documents internationally. Although considerable progress has been made to translate EBFM from theory to practice, limited attention has been given to assessing the theoretical and practical linkages between EBFM and fisheries co-management. While EBFM and fisheries co-management are not new ideas, growing interest in both compels reflection on the interplay of these concepts, even though they have traditionally been viewed as disparate approaches. We report on the results of a literature review that explored the extent to which EBFM and fisheries co-management are linked. We describe the fundamental drivers, attributes, and desired outcomes commonly used to characterize these management concepts and quantify the degree of overlap in the literature. To illustrate how EBFM and co-management are integrated in practice, we present three examples. These examples highlight that these concepts exist on a continuum, with elements of co-management regularly appearing in conventional management regimes and elements of EBFM appearing in fisheries co-management initiatives.

An environmental risk assessment framework for enhanced oil recovery solutions from offshore oil and gas industry

Vora M, Sanni S, Flage R. An environmental risk assessment framework for enhanced oil recovery solutions from offshore oil and gas industry. Environmental Impact Assessment Review [Internet]. 2021 ;88:106512. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0195925520307903?dgcid=raven_sd_search_email
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Environmental risk assessments are necessary to understand the risk associated with enhanced oil recovery (EOR) solutions and to provide decision support for choosing the best technology and implementing risk-reducing measures. This study presents a review of potentially relevant environmental/ecological risk assessment (ERA) guidelines and, based on this review, proposes an initial suggestion of an ERA framework for understanding the environmental impacts from EOR solutions. We first shortlist the important elements necessary for conducting an ERA of EOR solutions from the selected guidelines. These elements are then used to build the suggested ERA framework for produced water discharges, drilling discharges and emissions to air from EOR solutions, which is the primary objective of the present study. Furthermore, the emphasis is placed on identifying the knowledge gaps that exist for conducting ERA of EOR processes. In order to link the framework with the current best environmental practices, a review of environmental policies applicable to the marine environment around the European Union (EU) was conducted. Finally, some major challenges in the application of ERA methods for novel EOR technologies, i.e. uncertainties in the ERA due to lack of data and aggregation of risk from different environmental impacts, are discussed in detail. The frameworks suggested in this study should be possible to use by relevant stakeholders to assess environmental risk from enhanced oil recovery solutions.

Discovery of widely available abyssal rock patches reveals overlooked habitat type and prompts rethinking deep-sea biodiversity

Riehl T, Wölfl A-C, Augustin N, Devey CW, Brandt A. Discovery of widely available abyssal rock patches reveals overlooked habitat type and prompts rethinking deep-sea biodiversity. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences [Internet]. 2020 ;117(27):15450 - 15459. Available from: https://www.pnas.org/content/117/27/15450
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
Yes
Type: Journal Article

Habitat heterogeneity and species diversity are often linked. On the deep seafloor, sediment variability and hard-substrate availability influence geographic patterns of species richness and turnover. The assumption of a generally homogeneous, sedimented abyssal seafloor is at odds with the fact that the faunal diversity in some abyssal regions exceeds that of shallow-water environments. Here we show, using a ground-truthed analysis of multibeam sonar data, that the deep seafloor may be much rockier than previously assumed. A combination of bathymetry data, ruggedness, and backscatter from a trans-Atlantic corridor along the Vema Fracture Zone, covering crustal ages from 0 to 100 Ma, show rock exposures occurring at all crustal ages. Extrapolating to the whole Atlantic, over 260,000 km2 of rock habitats potentially occur along Atlantic fracture zones alone, significantly increasing our knowledge about abyssal habitat heterogeneity. This implies that sampling campaigns need to be considerably more sophisticated than at present to capture the full deep-sea habitat heterogeneity and biodiversity.

Distribution Patterns of Microplastics in Seawater Surface at a Portuguese Estuary and Marine Park

Rodrigues D, Antunes J, Otero V, Sobral P, Costa MHelena. Distribution Patterns of Microplastics in Seawater Surface at a Portuguese Estuary and Marine Park. Frontiers in Environmental Science [Internet]. 2020 ;8. Available from: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2020.582217/full?utm_source=F-AAE&utm_medium=EMLF&utm_campaign=MRK_1538675_25_Enviro_20210126_arts_A
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Measuring local levels of marine pollution by microplastics (MP) and identifying potential sources in coastal areas is essential to evaluate the associated impacts to environment and biota. The accumulation of floating MP at the sea surface is of great concern as the neustonic habitat consists of a feeding ground for primary consumers (including filter-feeders) and active predators, which makes these organisms a relevant via of MP input into the marine trophic chain. Here, a baseline evaluation of MP accumulation at the sea surface was conducted with a neuston net (335 μm mesh) at the Arrábida coastal area, in Portugal. The study site encompasses a marine protected area and an estuary, both under strong anthropogenic pressures due to multiple activities taking place. A short-term investigation on local spatiotemporal distribution, concentration and composition of MP was performed for the first time, through the monthly collection (summer 2018 to winter 2019) of samples at 6 stations. All the neuston samples contained MP and their mean concentration was 0.45 ± 0.52 items m−3 (mean ± SD). Both the averaged MP:neuston and MP:ichthyoplankton ratios were higher in December, when concentrations of organisms decreased. Temporal distribution patterns followed expected trends, as MP concentration was clearly higher in winter months due to precipitation and runoff. Although mean MP concentrations did not vary significantly between sampling stations, there was a spatial distribution of MP in relation to particle shape and size. Fragments were the most abundant shape and MP belonging to 1–2 mm size class were dominant. Amongst a diversity of 10 polymers identified by FTIR analysis, polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP) and copolymer PP/PE were the most abundant. Potential links between local sources/activities and the different polymers were suggested. Altogether, the information provided in this study aims to raise awareness among the identified sectors and consequently to act toward the prevention of MP inputs in the region.

The role of oceanographic processes and sedimentological settings on the deposition of microplastics in marine sediment: Icelandic waters

Loughlin C, Mendes ARMarques, Morrison L, Morley A. The role of oceanographic processes and sedimentological settings on the deposition of microplastics in marine sediment: Icelandic waters. Marine Pollution Bulletin [Internet]. 2021 ;164:111976. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025326X21000102?dgcid=raven_sd_search_email
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The global distribution of microplastic debris on the sea floor poses an increasing risk to marine organisms and ecosystems. Here, we present a distribution analysis of microplastics collected from eight marine multicores recovered from the Iceland continental shelf and surrounding areas at water depth between 241 and 1628 m. We report a total of 306 microplastics from the size range > 250 μm −5 mm, of which all were fibers. Microplastic numbers range between 0.119 and 0.768 per gram of dry sediments. In the analysis we assess the potential role of oceanic surface and bottom water currents, organic content, and sediment type on the distribution, deposition, and burial of microplastics in marine sediments. Our results provide the first record of microplastic pollution of marine sediments from the Iceland continental shelf and identify Atlantic Cod feeding and breeding grounds as potential hot spot for the accumulation of marine debris.

Assessment of seasonal and spatial variations in the nutritional content of six edible marine bivalve species by the response of a set of integrated biomarkers

Silva DCC, Neto JM, Nunes C, Gonçalves FJM, Coimbra MA, Marques JC, Gonçalves AMM. Assessment of seasonal and spatial variations in the nutritional content of six edible marine bivalve species by the response of a set of integrated biomarkers. Ecological Indicators [Internet]. 2021 ;124:107378. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1470160X21000431?dgcid=raven_sd_search_email
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Bivalves are widely distributed through diverse habitats, including estuaries and coastal lagoons which are extremely productive ecosystems, and play important roles in trophic webs and in ecosystems’ biological processes. Bivalves, as well as other marine resources, have been a part of the humans’ diet since mankind started fishing. These resources have high nutritional values, being constituted by high protein and low fat contents, and its consumption is associated with several health benefits. Marine resources, like bivalves, that are highly appreciated by humans, represent an important economic value, being under pressure due to an increasing demand. Thus, it is important a sustainable and balanced exploitation of these resources, based on the knowledge of the biochemical composition of the aquatic species to comprehend its’ potential and nutritional value.

The present study was conducted in Portugal, a country that has one of the highest consumptions of seafood in the world. Six commercially valuable species of marine bivalves were harvested in two distinct areas, Mondego estuary and Ria Formosa lagoon, and in two seasons, winter 2016 and summer 2017. The aims of the study were to: 1) determine the biochemical composition of each species in terms of total protein content, fatty acid and carbohydrate profiles; 2) identify potential spatial and seasonal variations between bivalve species sampled in each study area and season; 3) assess feeding behaviour of the bivalve species in both seasons and study areas.

The results indicated diverse biochemical composition among bivalve species, with total protein as the major component, followed by fatty acid content, particularly by the essential fatty acids DHA and EPA, and glycogen and glucose as the main polysaccharide and monosaccharide, respectively, found in all specimens. In general, all species demonstrated a tendency for omnivory, with only S. marginatus presenting a clear herbivorous behaviour in summer. Despite M. galloprovincialis and R. decussatus showed the highest nutritional value in the Mondego estuary, in both seasons, it was more noticeable in winter. In Ria Formosa, C. edule and R. decussatus showed the highest nutritious value in both seasons, while C. gigas showed higher nutritive value in summer.

Aquaculture in Brazil: past, present and future

Valenti WC, Barros HP, Moraes-Valenti P, Bueno GW, Cavalli RO. Aquaculture in Brazil: past, present and future. Aquaculture Reports [Internet]. 2021 ;19:100611. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2352513421000272?dgcid=raven_sd_search_email
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Aquaculture in Brazil probably started in the 17th century, during the Dutch occupation of the northeastern region. Currently, this activity can be divided into five main sectors, defined by tradition and type of cultured organism: freshwater fish, marine shrimp, mollusks, freshwater prawns and frogs. Production in 2019 was estimated at 800,000 tonnes, representing a gross revenue of US$ 1 billion. Freshwater fish is predominantly produced, followed by marine shrimp. The main farmed species are Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum) and the Pacific white leg shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei). Other species have great local socio-economic importance. The bulk of production comes from small farms: more than 80 % have less than 2 ha. Brazil has more than 200 thousand freshwater fish farms, about 3000 marine shrimp farms, and about 100 aquaculture research institutions. A large domestic market is available for edible fish and shellfish, ornamentals, baitfish and hatchery-reared juveniles for biomitigation purposes. The challenge is to develop truly sustainable production systems to support a perennial industry. New technologies, including digital devices and simple disruptive innovations, can increase productivity and support the shift to a circular economy, bioeconomics and sustainability supported by science-based innovations and knowledge.

Effect of melt ponds fraction on sea ice anomalies in the Arctic Ocean

Feng J, Zhang Y, Cheng Q, Wong K, Li Y, Tsou JYeu. Effect of melt ponds fraction on sea ice anomalies in the Arctic Ocean. International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation [Internet]. 2021 ;98:102297. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0303243421000039?dgcid=raven_sd_search_email
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

We used deep learning networks to establish a relationship model among MODIS daily surface reflectance product (MOD09GA) and Arctic melt ponds fraction (MPF), ice fraction (IF), and open water fraction (OWF). We applied this model to MODIS 8-day surface reflectance (MOD09A1) to derive Arctic 8-day MPF and SIF (SIF as the sum of IF and MPF). The results demonstrate that our model improved MPF estimation accuracy to an RMSE of 3.7%, compared with previous models. The characteristics of MPF spatiotemporal changes seen in early summer (May-July) indicate that MPF increased first from May-June, reaching its peak around early July, and then decreased. In addition, early summer MPF was significantly negatively correlated with sea ice extent (SIE) in September. We also found that early summer MPF caused sea ice in the Beaufort Sea, the Chukchi Sea, and the East Siberian Sea to move to warm water. Moreover, the movement of sea ice from the marginal sea to the center of the Arctic was shown to be conducive to the reduction of SIE in September. Early summer MPF was also related to Arctic oscillation (AO) during June to July, and significantly positively related to air temperature in the East Siberian and Chukchi Seas in September. As a consequence, these areas produced more open water and absorbed more heat, reducing the extent of sea ice in September, while increasing their air temperatures. The results also show that early summer MPF has a high negative correlation with air temperature in northern China, and MPF can be used to predict air temperature in northern China. These new findings should be investigated in future studies with additional data collection and field observations.

Assessment of potential ecological risk of microplastics in the coastal sediments of India: A meta-analysis

Ranjani M, Veerasingam S, Venkatachalapathy R, Mugilarasan M, Bagaev A, Mukhanov V, Vethamony P. Assessment of potential ecological risk of microplastics in the coastal sediments of India: A meta-analysis. Marine Pollution Bulletin [Internet]. 2021 ;163:111969. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025326X21000035?dgcid=raven_sd_search_email
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Abundance, chemical composition and ecological risk of microplastics (MPs) in terrestrial and marine environments have merited substantial attention from the research communities. This is the first attempt to comprehend the ecological risk of MPs in sediments along the Indian coast using meta-data. Polymer hazard index (PHI), pollution load index (PLI) and potential ecological risk index (PERI) were used to evaluate the quality of sediments. Areas have high PHI values (>1000) due to the presence of polymers with high hazard scores such as polyamide (PA) and polystyrene (PS). According to PLI values, sediments along the west coast of India (WCI) are moderately contaminated with MPs (PLI: 3.03 to 15.5), whereas sediments along the east coast of India (ECI) are less contaminated (PLI: 1 to 6.14). The PERI values of sediments along the Indian coast showed higher ecological risk for the metropolitan cities, river mouths, potential fishing zones and the remote islands.

Designing Marine Spatial Planning Legislation for Implementation: A Guide for Legal Drafters

, PLLC A| Environm. Designing Marine Spatial Planning Legislation for Implementation: A Guide for Legal Drafters. Environmental Law Institute; 2020. Available from: https://www.eli.org/research-report/designing-marine-spatial-planning-legislation-implementation-guide-legal-drafters
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Report

Ocean and coastal states around the world are increasingly seeking to better utilize and benefit from their ocean environments, which can be vast in comparison to their land areas. Conflicting human uses, a changing climate, and a desire to ensure long-term sustainability compound the challenge to grow a robust “blue economy.” Consequently, countries are turning to marine spatial planning as a comprehensive management tool to assess and organize present uses of their ocean environments and map for future uses. A wealth of literature describes the importance of marine spatial planning and how it can be used to organize a country’s ocean activities. To date, little attention has been paid to how countries can give their marine spatial planning initiatives the force of law. Designing Marine Spatial Planning Legislation for Implementation: A Guide for Legal Drafters is intended to fill this gap by providing a starting point for the busy government lawyer who has been asked to “draft a marine spatial planning law.” The Guide contains information about essential components and subcomponents of marine spatial planning legislation, describing each and highlighting its role and significance. The Guide also provides examples of textual provisions from existing marine spatial planning laws and regulations, along with sample provisions prepared by the authors, to illustrate how legislative or regulatory language can address each component.

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