Adaptive Management

Conservation Opportunities Arise From the Co-Occurrence of Surfing and Key Biodiversity Areas

Reineman DR, Koenig K, Strong-Cvetich N, Kittinger JN. Conservation Opportunities Arise From the Co-Occurrence of Surfing and Key Biodiversity Areas. Frontiers in Marine Science [Internet]. 2021 ;8. Available from: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2021.663460/full?utm_source=F-AAE&utm_medium=EMLF&utm_campaign=MRK_1599332_45_Marine_20210413_arts_A
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Conserving biodiversity and ecosystem services requires diverse models that empower communities to steward and benefit from resources. Here we investigate the potential of surfing resources, a new conservation asset class, and the surfing community, an underutilized conservation constituency, to conserve marine biodiversity. We conducted a spatial analysis of the overlap among Key Biodiversity Areas, Marine Protected Areas (MPAs), and 3,755 surf breaks globally. We find that 62.77% of surf breaks are not within MPAs and that 25.81% of all surf breaks are within 5 km of a Key Biodiversity Area, but are not within a MPA, suggesting that strategic conservation opportunities arise from the co-occurrence of surfing resources and biodiversity priorities. Establishing or extending protections to surfing ecosystems could increase protection for biodiversity at one-quarter of surf breaks. Sustainable management of these resources ensures their ability to provide for the character, economy, and development of coastal communities worldwide.

How ready are we to cope with climate change? Extent of adaptation to sea level rise and coastal risks in local planning documents of southern France

Robert S, Schleyer-Lindenmann A. How ready are we to cope with climate change? Extent of adaptation to sea level rise and coastal risks in local planning documents of southern France. Land Use Policy [Internet]. 2021 ;104:105354. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0264837721000776?dgcid=raven_sd_search_email
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Sea-level rise and related risks are an aspect of climate change that deeply affects coastal areas worldwide and calls for adaptive responses. Spatial planning is one key to adaptation, in particular at local level, where coastal risks might be experienced and solutions need to be developed. However, local spatial planning is a complex process involving various governance levels and decision-makers in specific social, cultural, economic and geographical contexts. Focusing on Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur region in southern France, this article proposes an analysis of the extent to which coastal risks are taken into account in the town planning documents of 65 coastal municipalities. The objective is to assess how seriously sea-level rise, coastal risks and adaptation are addressed in spatial planning. Results show that there is still a long way to go. Local development strategies often run counter to the idea of adapting, while local authorities and central government need to take a more collaborative approach. This work also shows the relevance of using spatial planning documents to reveal territories’ attitudes to adaptive policies, and the crucial role played by interaction between decisional levels.

Mangrove Rehabilitation and Restoration as Experimental Adaptive Management

Ellison AM, Felson AJ, Friess DA. Mangrove Rehabilitation and Restoration as Experimental Adaptive Management. Frontiers in Marine Science [Internet]. 2020 ;7. Available from: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2020.00327/full?utm_source=F-AAE&utm_medium=EMLF&utm_campaign=MRK_1334659_45_Marine_20200521_arts_A
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Rehabilitated and restored mangrove ecosystems have important ecological, economic, and social values for coastal communities. Although a sine qua non of successful mangrove rehabilitation or restoration projects is accurate attention to local hydrology and basic biology of mangrove trees and their associated fauna, their long-term success depends on far more axes, each with their own challenges. Rehabilitation projects: are planned, designed, executed, and managed by people with diverse backgrounds and different scientific and socio-political agendas; need to be responsive to these multiple stakeholders and agents who hold different values; are often influenced by laws and treaties spanning local to international scales; and must be able to adapt and evolve both geomorphologically and socioeconomically over decades-to-centuries in the context of a rapidly changing climate. We view these challenges as opportunities for innovative approaches to rehabilitation and restoration that engage new and larger constituencies. Restored mangrove ecosystems can be deliberately designed and engineered to provide valuable ecosystem services, be adaptable to climatic changes, and to develop platforms for educating nonspecialists about both the successes and failures of restored mangrove ecosystems. When mangrove rehabilitation or restoration projects are developed as experiments, they can be used as case-studies and more general models to inform policy- and decision-makers and guide future restoration efforts. Achieving this vision will require new investment and dedication to research and adaptive management practices. These ideas are illustrated with examples from mangrove restoration and rehabilitation projects in the Indo-West Pacific and Caribbean regions, the two hotspots of mangrove biodiversity and its ongoing loss and degradation.

Pilot plant study on nitrogen and phosphorus removal in marine wastewater by marine sediment with sequencing batch reactor

Kim J, Kang S, Kim H-S, Kim S, Lee S-S. Pilot plant study on nitrogen and phosphorus removal in marine wastewater by marine sediment with sequencing batch reactor Sundaramanickam A. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2020 ;15(5):e0233042. Available from: https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0233042
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Effective biological treatment of marine wastewater is not well-known. Accumulation of nitrogen and phosphorus from land-based effluent is a crucial cause of red-tide in marine systems. The purpose of the study is to reduce nitrogen and phosphorus in marine wastewater with a pilot plant-scale sequencing batch reactor (SBR) system by using marine sediment as eco-friendly and effective biological materials, and elucidate which bacterial strains in sludge from marine sediment influence the performance of SBR. By applying eco-friendly high efficiency marine sludge (eco-HEMS), the treatment performance was 15 m3 d-1 of treatment amount in 4.5 m3 of the reactor with the average removal efficiency of 89.3% for total nitrogen and 94.9% for total phosphorus at the optimal operation condition in summer. Moreover, the average removal efficiency was 84.0% for total nitrogen and 88.3% for total phosphorus in winter although biological treatment efficiency in winter is generally lower due to bacterial lower activity. These results were revealed by the DNA barcoding analysis of 16s rRNA amplicon sequencing of samples from the sludge in winter. The comparative analysis of the bacterial community composition in sludge at the high efficiency of the system showed the predominant genera Psychromonas (significantly increased to 45.6% relative abundance), Vibrio (13.3%), Gaetbulibacter (5.7%), and Psychroserpens (4.3%) in the 4 week adaptation after adding marine sediment, suggesting that those predominant bacteria influenced the treatment performance in winter.

Social-Environmental Analysis for the Management of Coastal Lagoons in North Africa

Mahrad BEl, Abalansa S, Newton A, Icely JD, Snoussi M, Kacimi I. Social-Environmental Analysis for the Management of Coastal Lagoons in North Africa. Frontiers in Environmental Science [Internet]. 2020 ;8. Available from: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2020.00037/full?utm_source=F-AAE&utm_medium=EMLF&utm_campaign=MRK_1332835_25_Enviro_20200519_arts_A
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

This study provides an overview of 11 lagoons in North Africa, from the Atlantic to the Eastern Mediterranean. Lagoons are complex, transitional, coastal zones providing valuable ecosystem services that contribute to the welfare of the human population. The main economic sectors in the lagoons included fishing, shellfish harvesting, and salt and sand extraction, as well as maritime transport. Economic sectors in the areas around the lagoons and in the watershed included agriculture, tourism, recreation, industrial, and urban development. Changes were also identified in land use from reclamation, changes in hydrology, changes in sedimentology from damming, inlet modifications, and coastal engineering. The human activities in and around the lagoons exert multiple pressures on these ecosystems and result in changes in the environment, affecting salinity, dissolved oxygen, and erosion; changes in the ecology, such as loss of biodiversity; and changes in the delivery of valuable ecosystem services. Loss of ecosystem services such as coastal protection and seafood affect human populations that live around the lagoons and depend on them for their livelihood. Adaptive management frameworks for social–ecological systems provide options that support decision makers with science-based knowledge to deliver sustainable development for ecosystems. The framework used to support the decision makers for environmental management of these 11 lagoons is Drivers–Activities–Pressures–State Change–Impact (on Welfare)–Responses (as Measures).

Life below water: Fish spawning aggregations as bright spots for a sustainable ocean

Pittman SJ, Heyman WD. Life below water: Fish spawning aggregations as bright spots for a sustainable ocean. Conservation Letters [Internet]. 2020 . Available from: https://conbio.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/conl.12722
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Transient fish spawning aggregations (FSAs) are critical life‐cycle events for many commercially important species, in which fish congregate in huge numbers to spawn at predictable times and places. This behavior makes them exceptionally vulnerable to fishing. The “illusion of plenty” and poor access to monitoring tools and techniques has resulted in some FSAs being overfished or unwittingly eliminated. We present a co‐conservation network, formally linking site‐focused partners who cooperatively monitor and actively manage multispecies FSAs. FSA sites and networks offer great potential as conservation bright spots to replenish fished populations, rehabilitate marine ecosystems, and ensure the flow of ecosystem services to the millions of people that rely upon them for their wellbeing. We call for urgent global recognition of FSAs as effective spatial nexus for addressing multiple interconnected global policy targets for a sustainable ocean.

Coastal Ecosystems of the Tropics - Adaptive Management

Ayyam V, Palanivel S, Chandrakasan S, Ayyam V, Palanivel S, Chandrakasan S. Coastal Ecosystems of the Tropics - Adaptive Management. Singapore: Springer Singapore; 2019 pp. 3 - 20. Available from: https://link.springer.com/book/10.1007/978-981-13-8926-9
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $109.00
Type: Book

Tropical coastal environment represents one of the most dynamic and vital interfaces on Earth, at the boundary between land and sea. It encompasses some of the most diverse and productive habitats. These habitats include natural ecosystems, managed ecosystems besides major urban centres. The existence of these ecosystems is dependent on the land-sea interconnection and dynamic flow of energy and matter. At the same time, the coastal region has long been under stress from over-exploitation and mismanagement. The increasing pace of human population and developmental activities in the tropical coastal region has altered the functionality of coastal ecosystems and endangered several flora and fauna that threaten the livelihood of people who depend on them. In addition, the looming spectre of sea level rise associated with the effect of global warming presents a new and potentially far more dangerous threat to this region. This necessitates suitable coastal zone management plan to conserve and derive sustainable benefit from the coastal ecosystems. With this background an overview of tropical coastal countries, its demographic features, natural resources, coastal ecosystems, and its services to the human society are discussed in this chapter. Brief account on effect of human activities and climate change on coastal region sourced from different literatures provides useful information to the researchers, students, and policymakers.

A planning strategy for the adaptation of coastal areas to climate change: The Spanish case

Losada IJ, Toimil A, Muñoz A, Garcia-Fletcher AP, Diaz-Simal P. A planning strategy for the adaptation of coastal areas to climate change: The Spanish case. Ocean & Coastal Management [Internet]. In Press :104983. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0964569119302959
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

In a context of growing concern about climate change and its potential consequences for coastal systems, adaptation is becoming more important than ever before. This paper presents a national planning framework for adaptation to climate change, which is pioneer in the field as it is multi-sectoral and focuses specifically on coastal areas, pursuing the safety of their communities in an uncertain future. The strategy is statutory as it emanates from the new Spanish Coastal Law, which in addition to many other implications includes the compulsory development of a Spanish Strategy for Coastal Adaptation to Climate Change (SSCACC) and its submission to Strategic Environmental Assessment. This paper covers the fundamental aspects of both the SSCACC and the accompanying Strategic Environmental Study, providing recommendations on the assessment of coastal risks triggered by climate change and extreme events, adaptation and risk reduction planning and implementation, and monitoring. Additionally, this work gives insight into the wide-ranging consultation process carried out prior to the SSCACC's approval and the stakeholders involved, and how the SSCACC handles climate change uncertainty and struggles for overcoming barriers.

Climate Change Vulnerability of American Lobster Fishing Communities in Atlantic Canada

Greenan BJW, Shackell NL, Ferguson K, Greyson P, Cogswell A, Brickman D, Wang Z, Cook A, Brennan CE, Saba VS. Climate Change Vulnerability of American Lobster Fishing Communities in Atlantic Canada. Frontiers in Marine Science [Internet]. 2019 ;6. Available from: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2019.00579/full?utm_source=F-AAE&utm_medium=EMLF&utm_campaign=MRK_1102147_45_Marine_20190919_arts_A
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Climate change impacts on fisheries will undoubtedly have socio-economic impacts on coastal communities and the seafood market. However, it is a challenge to integrate climate change information in a form that can be used efficiently by adaptation planners, policy makers, and fishery managers. In this study, we frame a climate change impact assessment using a geographical perspective based on the management units of the dominant fishery, in this case, American lobster in Nova Scotia, Canada. The information considered here includes economic dependence on the fishery, population size, diversity of the fishery revenue, status of harbor infrastructure, total replacement cost of each harbor, increased relative sea level and flooding, and the vulnerability of offshore lobster to ocean warming and changes in zooplankton composition and anticipatory changes in fishery productivity across management borders. Using two ocean models to provide multi-decadal scale projections of bottom temperature, changes in offshore lobster distribution are projected to have a neutral, or positive impact on the region as a whole. However, when lobster vulnerability is combined with climate change related vulnerabilities of coastal fishing communities, it is evident that adaptation planning is needed for long-term sustainability. This impact assessment provides both a framework and information for further in-depth analyses by climate change adaptation planners and fishery managers.

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