Adaptive Management

Collaborative adaptive management for bigfin squid applied to tourism-related activities in coastal waters of Northeast Taiwan

Chen T-C, Ku K-C, Chen C-S. Collaborative adaptive management for bigfin squid applied to tourism-related activities in coastal waters of Northeast Taiwan. Ocean & Coastal Management [Internet]. 2016 ;119:208 - 216. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0964569115300454
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The bigfin squid Sepioteuthis lessoniana, a commercially important fishery resource and also an object of sightseeing for diving, are under risk situation arising from current management procedure in Taiwan. Significant decline in abundance of bigfin squid and destruction of suitable substrates for spawning of neritic squids in coastal waters of Northeast Taiwan has been noted by local fishermen in recent years. Local divers arbitrarily deployed bamboo clusters as a squid aggregation device, for mating and spawning, in order to restore the abundance of squid. The deployment of the devices was not approved by the government, in particular the fishery authorities. Following conflict and compromises, the bamboo clusters were placed in restricted regions with permission from the local government. However, the interim management measure faced a serious challenge. The fishing activity of fishermen and recreational anglers, who were not consulted for the interim measure, targeted the aggregated squids putting them at risk. To prevent hazards, a theoretical management model was proposed to involve and direct essential stakeholders in conservation and sustainable utilization of the resource. A fishbone diagram and spiral model was created to analyze and illustrate the potential problems. Collaborative management tools were applied to coordinate the participants' duties and responsibilities and build the interrelationships between them. Finally, a modified management model based on adaptive management strategies was developed to cope with the changing situations. This modified management model process might further serve as an example for conservation and management measures of other fisheries resources.

Key issues and drivers affecting coastal and marine resource decisions: Participatory management strategy evaluation to support adaptive management

Dutra LXC, Thebaud O, Boschetti F, Smith ADM, Dichmont CM. Key issues and drivers affecting coastal and marine resource decisions: Participatory management strategy evaluation to support adaptive management. Ocean & Coastal Management [Internet]. 2015 ;116:382 - 395. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0964569115300107
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article
  • Improving resource information alone has limited effect on decision-making processes.
  • A formal participatory MSE allows for more transparency in the management process.
  • It supports strategy design, communication and shared understanding about management issues.
  • Participatory methods can help modify individual attitudes and group interactions.

Towards adaptive co-management of small-scale fisheries in Uruguay and Brazil: lessons from using Ostrom’s design principles

Trimble M, Berkes F. Towards adaptive co-management of small-scale fisheries in Uruguay and Brazil: lessons from using Ostrom’s design principles. Maritime Studies [Internet]. 2015 ;14(1). Available from: http://www.maritimestudiesjournal.com/content/14/1/14
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The literature on commons has established the validity and significance of Elinor Ostrom’s design principles for collective action. Can these principles be used to guide policies and initiatives towards adaptive co-management? We analyze this idea by using two case studies, Piriápolis (Uruguay) and Paraty (Brazil). Both cases are small-scale fisheries, and both have been experiencing a social-ecological crisis in a context of prevailing top-down government management. However, there are signs that government policies are moving towards participatory governance. The objective of this article is to identify opportunities and barriers to adaptive co-management of small-scale fisheries in Uruguay and Brazil using Ostrom’s design principles for guidance. Both case studies partially meet seven of the eleven design principles (as amended by Cox and colleagues), but do not fulfill four. The analysis of the fisheries using Ostrom’s principles sheds light on the opportunities and barriers to adaptive co-management in three categories: resource system, resource users, and governance system. Barriers include long-standing conflicts between small-scale fishers and government agencies, and between small and large-scale fisheries sectors. Nevertheless, recent initiatives involving participatory approaches to research and management show potential to improve compliance with several principles. Two weaknesses of using Ostrom’s principles for the analysis of the cases were a lack of attention to social learning and the exclusion of external drivers.

Adaptive governance, ecosystem management, and natural capital

Schultz L, Folke C, Österblom H, Olsson P. Adaptive governance, ecosystem management, and natural capital. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences [Internet]. 2015 ;112(24):7369 - 7374. Available from: http://www.pnas.org/lookup/doi/10.1073/pnas.1406493112
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

To gain insights into the effects of adaptive governance on natural capital, we compare three well-studied initiatives; a landscape in Southern Sweden, the Great Barrier Reef in Australia, and fisheries in the Southern Ocean. We assess changes in natural capital and ecosystem services related to these social–ecological governance approaches to ecosystem management and investigate their capacity to respond to change and new challenges. The adaptive governance initiatives are compared with other efforts aimed at conservation and sustainable use of natural capital: Natura 2000 in Europe, lobster fisheries in the Gulf of Maine, North America, and fisheries in Europe. In contrast to these efforts, we found that the adaptive governance cases developed capacity to perform ecosystem management, manage multiple ecosystem services, and monitor, communicate, and respond to ecosystem-wide changes at landscape and seascape levels with visible effects on natural capital. They enabled actors to collaborate across diverse interests, sectors, and institutional arrangements and detect opportunities and problems as they developed while nurturing adaptive capacity to deal with them. They all spanned local to international levels of decision making, thus representing multilevel governance systems for managing natural capital. As with any governance system, internal changes and external drivers of global impacts and demands will continue to challenge the long-term success of such initiatives.

The 10-tenets of adaptive management and sustainability: An holistic framework for understanding and managing the socio-ecological system

Barnard S, Elliott M. The 10-tenets of adaptive management and sustainability: An holistic framework for understanding and managing the socio-ecological system. Environmental Science & Policy [Internet]. 2015 ;51:181 - 191. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1462901115000817
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The three basic principles of sustainable development, relating to ecology, economy and society, have long been embedded within national and international strategies. In recent years we have augmented these principles by a further seven considerations giving rise to the so-called 10-tenets of sustainable management. Whilst theoretically appealing, discussion of the tenets to date has been largely generic and qualitative and, until the present paper, there has been no formal and quantitative application of these tenets to an actual example. To promote the concept of successful and sustainable environmental management there is the need to develop a robust and practical framework to accommodate value judgements relating to each of the tenets. Although, as originally presented, the tenets relate specifically to management measures, they may also be applied directly to a specific development or activity. This paper examines the application of the tenets in both of these contexts, and considers their incorporation into an assessment tool to help visualise and quantify issues of sustainability.

Adapting environmental management to uncertain but inevitable change

Nicol S, Fuller RA, Iwamura T, Chades I. Adapting environmental management to uncertain but inevitable change. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences [Internet]. 2015 ;282(1808). Available from: http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/cgi/doi/10.1098/rspb.2014.2984
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Implementation of adaptation actions to protect biodiversity is limited by uncertainty about the future. One reason for this is the fear of making the wrong decisions caused by the myriad future scenarios presented to decision-makers. We propose an adaptive management (AM) method for optimally managing a population under uncertain and changing habitat conditions. Our approach incorporates multiple future scenarios and continually learns the best management strategy from observations, even as conditions change. We demonstrate the performance of our AM approach by applying it to the spatial management of migratory shorebird habitats on the East Asian–Australasian flyway, predicted to be severely impacted by future sea-level rise. By accounting for non-stationary dynamics, our solution protects 25 000 more birds per year than the current best stationary approach. Our approach can be applied to many ecological systems that require efficient adaptation strategies for an uncertain future.

Dynamic Ocean Management: Identifying the Critical Ingredients of Dynamic Approaches to Ocean Resource Management

Lewison R, Hobday AJ, Maxwell S, Hazen E, Hartog JR, Dunn DC, Briscoe D, Fossette S, O'Keefe CE, Barnes M, et al. Dynamic Ocean Management: Identifying the Critical Ingredients of Dynamic Approaches to Ocean Resource Management. BioScience [Internet]. 2015 ;65(5):486 - 498. Available from: http://bioscience.oxfordjournals.org/content/65/5/486.abstract
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Dynamic ocean management, or management that uses near real-time data to guide the spatial distribution of commercial activities, is an emerging approach to balance ocean resource use and conservation. Employing a wide range of data types, dynamic ocean management can be used to meet multiple objectives—for example, managing target quota, bycatch reduction, and reducing interactions with species of conservation concern. Here, we present several prominent examples of dynamic ocean management that highlight the utility, achievements, challenges, and potential of this approach. Regulatory frameworks and incentive structures, stakeholder participation, and technological applications that align with user capabilities are identified as key ingredients to support successful implementation. By addressing the variability inherent in ocean systems, dynamic ocean management represents a new approach to tackle the pressing challenges of managing a fluid and complex environment.

Organizational drivers that strengthen adaptive capacity in the coastal zone of Australia

Dutra LXC, Bustamante RH, Sporne I, van Putten I, Dichmont CM, Ligtermoet E, Sheaves M, Deng RA. Organizational drivers that strengthen adaptive capacity in the coastal zone of Australia. Ocean & Coastal Management [Internet]. 2015 ;109:64 - 76. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S096456911500054X
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Governance has long been identified as a crucial part of solving environmental problems. Effective governance supports and encourages adaptive capacity to maintain or improve the conditions of socio-ecological systems. As coastal zones are among the most vulnerable systems to climate change impacts (e.g. sea-level rise), the adaptive capacity of coastal communities to climate change threats will be critical. Human populations will respond both directly and indirectly to these threats and impacts; for instance by adapting resource use and practices (e.g. changing fish targets). In this paper, we apply definitions of resilience, adaptive capacity and vulnerability to the coastal zone socio-ecological system. We focus on organizations and management aspects of governance in coastal Australia. Our approach combines a literature review that highlights key organizational drivers that supports adaptive capacity with interview data from senior resource managers from organizations from across Australia to test the validity of such drivers. The key drivers related to organizational and management issues that are required to build and strengthen the adaptive capacity of Australian coastal communities are: (a) Leadership; (b) Clear responsibilities and flexible organizational framework; (c) Effective integration of knowledge and insights; (d) Learning approach to natural resource management; and (e) Human capacity and coordinated participation in decision-making. Our study showed that natural resource management organizations are clearly concerned about future changes and uncertainties and recognize the need for cooperation and good organizational drivers. However, integration of knowledge and long-term planning to deal with predicted changes in climate is largely lacking; and mismatches between management, organizational and ecosystem boundaries and processes also exist.

One size does not fit all: Importance of adjusting conservation practices for endangered hawksbill turtles to address local nesting habitat needs in the eastern Pacific Ocean

Liles MJ, Peterson MJ, Seminoff JA, Altamirano E, Henríquez AV, Gaos AR, Gadea V, Urteaga J, Torres P, Wallace BP, et al. One size does not fit all: Importance of adjusting conservation practices for endangered hawksbill turtles to address local nesting habitat needs in the eastern Pacific Ocean. Biological Conservation [Internet]. 2015 ;184:405 - 413. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006320715000877
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Conservation biologists frequently use data from the same or related species collected in diverse geographic locations to guide interventions in situations where its applicability is uncertain. There are dangers inherent to this approach. The nesting habitats of critically endangered hawksbill sea turtles (Eretmochelys imbricata) cover a broad geographic global range. Based on data collected in the Caribbean and Indo-Pacific, conservationists assume hawksbills prefer open-coast beaches near coral reefs for nesting, and that individual hawksbills are highly consistent in nest placement, suggesting genetic factors partially account for variation in nest-site choice. We characterized nest-site preferences of hawksbills in El Salvador and Nicaragua, where >80% of nesting activity occurs for this species in the eastern Pacific, and ∼90% of hawksbill clutches are relocated to hatcheries for protection. We found hawksbills preferred nest sites with abundant vegetation on dynamic beaches within mangrove estuaries. Nests in El Salvador were located closer to the ocean and to the woody vegetation border than nests in Nicaragua, suggesting female hawksbills exhibit local adaptations to differences in nesting habitat. Individual hawksbills consistently placed nests under high percentages of overstory vegetation, but were not consistent in nest placement related to woody vegetation borders. We suggest conservation biologists use caution when generalizing about endangered species that invest in specific life-history strategies (e.g., nesting) over broad ranges based on data collected in distant locations when addressing conservation issues.

Adaptive management, international co-operation and planning for marine conservation hotspots in a changing climate

Gormley KSG, Hull AD, Porter JS, Bell MC, Sanderson WG. Adaptive management, international co-operation and planning for marine conservation hotspots in a changing climate. Marine Policy [Internet]. 2015 ;53:54 - 66. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X14003182
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
Yes
Type: Journal Article

The aim of this study is to predict changes in the distribution and extent of habitat forming species defined as “Priority Marine Habitats” (PMHs) in the North-East (NE) Atlantic under future scenarios of climate-induced environmental change. A Species Distribution Modelling method was used for each PMH to map the potential distribution of “most suitable” habitat. The area and percentage cover was calculated within each country׳s Exclusive Economic Zone for the baseline (2009) and the projected (2100) years. In addition, a conservation management score was calculated based on the number of PMHs that co-occur in assessment units. Overall, this study reveals the potential for movement and/or change in the extent of some PMHs across the NE Atlantic under an increased ocean temperature scenario (4 °C) by 2100. There are regional differences in the predicted changes and some countries will experience greater/different changes than others. The movement of biodiversity hotspots (where one or more PMHs occur in the same broad area) provides both opportunities and risks for conservation management that are discussed. Co-operation between neighbouring countries and marine regions will require substantial enhancement in order to provide a robust adaptive management strategy going forward.

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