Arctic

Comparison of Phytoplankton Communities Between Melt Ponds and Open Water in the Central Arctic Ocean

Zhang T, Zhuang Y, Jin H, Li K, Ji Z, Li Y, Bai Y. Comparison of Phytoplankton Communities Between Melt Ponds and Open Water in the Central Arctic Ocean. Journal of Ocean University of China [Internet]. 2019 ;18(3):573 - 579. Available from: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11802-019-3871-0
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Climate warming has a significant impact on the sea ice and ecosystem of the Arctic Ocean. Under the increasing numbers of melt ponds in Arctic sea ice, the phytoplankton communities associated with the ice system are changing. During the 7th Chinese National Arctic Research Expedition cruise in summer 2016, photosynthesis pigments and nutrients were analyzed, revealing differences in phytoplankton communities between melt ponds and open water in the central Arctic. Photo synthetic pigment analysis suggested that Fuco (5-91 μg m-3 and Diadino (4-21 μg m-3) were the main pigments in the open water. However, the melt ponds had high concentrations of Viola (7-30 μg m-3), Lut (4-59 μg m-3) and Chl b (11-38 μg m-3), suggesting that green algae dominated phytoplankton communities in the melt ponds. The significant differences in phytoplankton communities between melt ponds and open water might be due to the salinity difference. Moreover, green algae may play a more important role in Arctic sea ice ecosystems with the expected growing number of melt ponds in the central Arctic Ocean.

The Rapidly Changing Arctic and Its Impact on Global Climate

Zhao J, Zhong W, Diao Y, Cao Y. The Rapidly Changing Arctic and Its Impact on Global Climate. Journal of Ocean University of China [Internet]. 2019 ;18(3):537 - 541. Available from: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11802-019-3890-x
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Arctic sea ice has significant seasonal variability. Prior to the 2000s, it retreated about 15% in summer and fully recovered in winter. However, by the year 2007, Arctic sea ice extent experienced a catastrophic decline to about 4.28×106 km2, which was 50% lower than conditions in the 1950s to the 1970s (Serreze et al., 2008). That was a record low over the course of the modern satellite record, since 1979 (note that the year 2012 became the new record low). This astonishing event drew wide-ranging attention in 2007-2009 during the 4th International Polar Year. The dramatic decline of sea ice attracts many scientists' interest and has become the focus of intense research since then. Currently, sea ice retreat is not only appearing around the marginal ice zone, but also in the pack ice inside the central Arctic (Zhao et al., 2018). In fact, premonitory signs had already been seen through other evidence. Before the disintegration of the Soviet Union, US naval submarines had been conducting an extensive survey under the sea ice and taking measurements of sea ice thickness. Their measurements revealed a gradual decrease of ice thickness to 1.8 m during winter by the end of the 20th century, in contrast to the climatological mean of 3.1m (Rothrock et al., 1999). However, this alarming result did not draw much attention since the Arctic was still severely cold at that time.

A bibliometric analysis of global research on the arctic (with special interest in environmental issues)

Bancheva A. A bibliometric analysis of global research on the arctic (with special interest in environmental issues). Polar Science [Internet]. In Press . Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1873965218301336
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $31.50
Type: Journal Article

The paper deals with the quantitative assessment of scientific publications regarding the Arctic indexed in SciVerse Scopus in the ten-year period (2007–2016 years). The research shows that the number of publications on the Arctic theme was consistently increasing over the previous years. The most frequently published topic concerns indigenous peoples, the most dynamic in its growth topic is renewable energy and the most active countries are The United States of America (USA), Canada, the United Kingdom, Norway, Germany. Basing on the results of this bibliometric study the original typology of the topics concerning the Arctic is created. The conducted bibliometric review shows the current situation of scientific research on this region and gives the data to predict its evolution in the next several years.

Nudging the Arctic Ocean to quantify sea ice feedbacks

Dekker E, Bintanja R, Severijns C. Nudging the Arctic Ocean to quantify sea ice feedbacks. Journal of Climate [Internet]. 2019 . Available from: https://journals.ametsoc.org/doi/abs/10.1175/JCLI-D-18-0321.1
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.00
Type: Journal Article

With Arctic summer sea ice potentially disappearing halfway through this century, the surface albedo and insulating effects of Arctic sea ice will decrease considerably. The ongoing Arctic sea ice retreat also affects the strength of the Planck, lapse-rate, cloud and surface albedo feedbacks together with changes in the heat exchange between the ocean and the atmosphere, but their combined effect on climate sensitivity has not been quantified. This study presents an estimate of all Arctic sea ice related climate feedbacks combined. We use a new method to keep Arctic sea ice at its present day (PD) distribution under a changing climate in a 50-year CO2 doubling simulation, using a fully coupled global climate model (EC-Earth V2.3). We nudge the Arctic Ocean to the (monthly-dependent) year 2000 mean temperature and minimum salinity fields on a mask representing PD sea ice cover. We are able to preserve about 95% of the PD mean March and 77% of the September PD Arctic sea ice extent by applying this method. Using simulations with and without nudging, we estimate the climate response associated with Arctic sea ice changes. The Arctic sea ice feedback globally equals 0.28 ± 0.15 Wm−2K−1. The total sea ice feedback thus amplifies the climate response for a doubling of CO2, in line with earlier findings. Our estimate of the Arctic sea ice feedback agrees reasonably well with earlier CMIP5 global climate feedback estimates and shows that the Arctic sea ice exerts a considerable effect on the Arctic and global climate sensitivity.

Simulated ballast water accumulation along Arctic shipping routes

Rosenhaim ILinck, Riemann-Campe K, Sumata H, Koeberle C, Brauner R, Herber A, Gerdes R. Simulated ballast water accumulation along Arctic shipping routes. Marine Policy [Internet]. 2019 ;103:9 - 18. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X18304421
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The recent decline of the Arctic sea ice cover leads to an increasing number of vessels navigating through the Arctic shipping routes. Ballast water, essential for the vessel's safety during voyages and cargo transfers, however, is also considered one of the main vectors for transport and introduction of non-indigenous species. The aim of this paper is to investigate potential effects of the ballast water discharged in the main Arctic shipping routes on the local environment. For that a passive tracer was implemented in a fine resolution coupled ocean-sea ice model covering the entire Arctic and northern North Atlantic, to simulate the spread of the ballast water discharged based on release points along real ship positions from 2013. The model results showed that spring and summer were the seasons with the highest tendency for accumulation of ballast water tracer on the surface layers south of NovayaZemlyaand south of Spitsbergen, not only due to a higher number of vessels navigating in the area but also due to strong stratification. During winter and autumn, the tracer was mixed with and into deeper layers due to vertical convection. The simulated ballast water accumulation during spring and summer indicated that organisms, that survived the voyage in the ballast tanks, could establish a stable or growing population and eventually become invasive.

Ecosystem services in the Arctic: a thematic review

Malinauskaite L, Cook D, Davíðsdóttir B, Ögmundardóttir H, Roman J. Ecosystem services in the Arctic: a thematic review. Ecosystem Services [Internet]. 2019 ;36:100898. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2212041618305175
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $31.50
Type: Journal Article

The study presents the first systematic review of the existing literature on Arctic ES. Applying the Search, Appraisal, Synthesis and Analysis (SALSA) and snowballing methods and three selection criteria, 33 publications were sourced, including peer-reviewed articles, policy papers and scientific reports, and their content synthesised using the thematic analysis method. Five key themes were identified: (1) general discussion of Arctic ES, (2) Arctic social-ecological systems, (3) ES valuation, (4) ES synergies and/or trade-offs, and (5) integrating the ES perspective into management. The meta-synthesis of the literature reveals that the ES concept is increasingly being applied in the Arctic context in all five themes, but there remain large knowledge gaps concerning mapping, assessment, economic valuation, analysis of synergies, trade-offs, and underlying mechanisms, and the social effects of ES changes. Even though ES are discussed in most publications as being relevant for policy, there are few practical examples of its direct application to management. The study concludes that more primary studies of Arctic ES are needed on all of the main themes as well as governance initiatives to move Arctic ES research from theory to practice.

Abundance and species diversity hotspots of tracked marine predators across the North American Arctic

Yurkowski DJ, Auger-Méthé M, Mallory ML, Wong SNP, Gilchrist G, Derocher AE, Richardson E, Lunn NJ, Hussey NE, Marcoux M, et al. Abundance and species diversity hotspots of tracked marine predators across the North American Arctic Beger M. Diversity and Distributions [Internet]. 2018 . Available from: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/ddi.12860
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $42.00
Type: Journal Article

Aim

Climate change is altering marine ecosystems worldwide and is most pronounced in the Arctic. Economic development is increasing leading to more disturbances and pressures on Arctic wildlife. Identifying areas that support higher levels of predator abundance and biodiversity is important for the implementation of targeted conservation measures across the Arctic.

Location

Primarily Canadian Arctic marine waters but also parts of the United States, Greenland and Russia.

Methods

We compiled the largest data set of existing telemetry data for marine predators in the North American Arctic consisting of 1,283 individuals from 21 species. Data were arranged into four species groups: (a) cetaceans and pinnipeds, (b) polar bears Ursus maritimus (c) seabirds, and (d) fishes to address the following objectives: (a) to identify abundance hotspots for each species group in the summer–autumn and winter–spring; (b) to identify species diversity hotspots across all species groups and extent of overlap with exclusive economic zones; and (c) to perform a gap analysis that assesses amount of overlap between species diversity hotspots with existing protected areas.

Results

Abundance and species diversity hotpots during summer–autumn and winter–spring were identified in Baffin Bay, Davis Strait, Hudson Bay, Hudson Strait, Amundsen Gulf, and the Beaufort, Chukchi and Bering seas both within and across species groups. Abundance and species diversity hotpots occurred within the continental slope in summer–autumn and offshore in areas of moving pack ice in winter–spring. Gap analysis revealed that the current level of conservation protection that overlaps species diversity hotspots is low covering only 5% (77,498 km2) in summer–autumn and 7% (83,202 km2) in winter–spring.

Main conclusions

We identified several areas of potential importance for Arctic marine predators that could provide policymakers with a starting point for conservation measures given the multitude of threats facing the Arctic. These results are relevant to multilevel and multinational governance to protect this vulnerable ecosystem in our rapidly changing world.

Chinese legislation in the exploration of marine mineral resources and its adoption in the Arctic Ocean

Chang Y-C. Chinese legislation in the exploration of marine mineral resources and its adoption in the Arctic Ocean. Ocean & Coastal Management [Internet]. 2019 ;168:265 - 273. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S096456911830646X
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

This paper aims to discuss Chinese legislation in the exploration of marine mineral resources and its adoption in the Arctic Ocean. The journey commences by providing comments on the ‘Law of the People's Republic of China on the Exploration and Development of Resources in the Deep Seabed Area’ and to explore Chinese domestic legislation regulating Chinese enterprises' development activities in the Arctic area. Attention also pays to legislation regulating Chinese and foreign enterprises in the exploitation of mineral resources in China's continental shelf with special concern toward the protection of ecological environment. This paper concludes by suggesting that there is a need to further improve Chinese domestic legislation and draw on advanced legislative experience from various States and international law, in order to provide strong domestic legal protection for exploitation activities.

An examination of trans-Arctic vessel routing in the Central Arctic Ocean

Stevenson TC, Davies J, Huntington HP, Sheard W. An examination of trans-Arctic vessel routing in the Central Arctic Ocean. Marine Policy [Internet]. In Press . Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X18307334
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

As the Arctic continues to warm, summer sea ice will continue to recede and a greater expanse of Arctic waters will become navigable. These changes may result in an increase in vessel traffic to the region, including via the Transpolar Sea Route (TSR), through the high seas area of the central Arctic Ocean (CAO). This paper begins with a review of the literature on Arctic vessel traffic to assess the potential effects of various stressors related to vessel traffic in the Arctic Ocean. Available data concerning environmental and safety risks for the Arctic Ocean are used to propose vessel TSR vessel traffic routes that can reduce those risks. The paper concludes with a brief discussion of several examples of vulnerability assessments focused on impacts from vessel traffic in the Arctic as potential models for future work specific to the CAO. The results from this review indicate vessel oiling, air pollution, and noise from icebreakers are immediate concerns to the Arctic Ocean that will likely worsen as the region becomes more navigable and vessel traffic increases. The proposed vessel routes for the Arctic Ocean are meant to serve as a starting point for further discussions before the region becomes fully navigable. As additional data become available, these efforts can be refined further, and a rigorous vulnerability assessment may become possible. Designation as a Particularly Sensitive Sea Area under international law could provide a useful mechanism for creating and updating precautionary shipping measures as more information becomes available.

Could offspring predation offset the successful reproduction of the arctic copepod Calanus hyperboreus under reduced sea-ice cover conditions?

Darnis G, Wold A, Falk-Petersen S, Graeve M, Fortier L. Could offspring predation offset the successful reproduction of the arctic copepod Calanus hyperboreus under reduced sea-ice cover conditions?. Progress in Oceanography [Internet]. 2019 ;170:107 - 118. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0079661117303415
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Life cycle and reproduction of Calanus hyperboreus were studied during a year of record low ice cover in the southeastern Beaufort Sea. Stages CIV, adult females and CV dominated the overwintering population, suggesting a 2- to 3-year life cycle. Within two spring-summer months in the upper water column females filled their energy reserves before initiating their downward seasonal migration. From February to March, vigorous reproduction (20–65 eggs f−1 d−1) delivered numerous eggs (29 000 eggs m−2) at depth and nauplii N1-N3 (17 000 ind. m−2) in the water column. However, CI copepodite recruitment in May, coincident with the phytoplankton bloom, was modest in Amundsen Gulf compared to sites outside the gulf. Consequently, C. hyperboreus abundance and biomass stagnated throughout summer in Amundsen Gulf. As a mismatch between the first-feeding stages and food was unlikely under the favourable feeding conditions of April-May 2008, predation on the egg and larval stages in late winter presumably limited subsequent recruitment and population growth. Particularly abundant in Amundsen Gulf, the copepods Metridia longa and C. glacialis were likely important consumers of C. hyperboreus eggs and nauplii. With the ongoing climate-driven lengthening of the ice-free season, intensification of top-down control of C. hyperboreus recruitment by thriving populations of mesopelagic omnivores and carnivores like M. longa may counteract the potential benefits of increased primary production over the Arctic shelves margins for this key prey of pelagic fish, seabirds and the bowhead whale.

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