Bycatch

Management of deep-water sharks’ by-catch in the Portuguese anglerfish fishery: from EU regulations to practice

Moura T, Fernandes A, Figueiredo I, Alpoim R, Azevedo M. Management of deep-water sharks’ by-catch in the Portuguese anglerfish fishery: from EU regulations to practice. Marine Policy [Internet]. 2018 ;90:55 - 67. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X17301458
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

The European Union banned fishing operations with trammel, entangling and gillnets in Portuguese continental waters at depths >200 m in consideration of the potential impact of fisheries on deep-sea sharks. Derogation could be considered if Member States demonstrate that by-catch mortality does not adversely affect this group of species. This regulation has had an impact on the trammel net fishery for anglerfish (Lophius piscatoriusand Lophius budegassa), one of the most important Portuguese multi-species fisheries. This study evaluates the impact of this fishery on deep-water shark populations by looking at onboard observations of by-catch in the commercial fishery and by analysing survey catch composition. Results suggest that this fishery has a very low impact on deep-water shark populations: by-catch was <5% by weight of the total catch in 98% of the hauls conducted in the depth range allowed for this fishery (<600 m). Frequency of occurrence of deep-water sharks was also low. Etmopterus spinax and Etmopterus pusillus were the only species found to overlap with this fishery to any great extent; all the others largely distribute at depths greater than 600 m. A higher overlap is expected in hauls catching L. piscatorius, which seems to distribute at greater depths, but more information is needed to clarify the distribution pattern of this species. Scientific data supports the proposed change to the EU regulation. If necessary, future management measures may rely on spatial closures, but would require enhanced knowledge on species’ spatial distributions and also on social and economic aspects of this fishery.

Fisheries bycatch reduction within the least-cost biodiversity mitigation hierarchy: Conservatory offsets with an application to sea turtles

Squires D, Restrepo V, Garcia S, Dutton P. Fisheries bycatch reduction within the least-cost biodiversity mitigation hierarchy: Conservatory offsets with an application to sea turtles. Marine Policy [Internet]. 2018 ;93:55 - 61. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X17303020
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

This paper considers fisheries bycatch reduction within the least-cost biodiversity impact mitigation hierarchy. It introduces conservatory offsets that are implemented earlier in the biodiversity impact mitigation hierarchy than conventional compensatory offsets used as instruments of last resort. The paper illustrates implementation in an on-going sea turtle conservation programme by the International Seafood Sustainability Foundation.

Reducing Elasmobranch Bycatch in the Atlantic Seabob (Xiphopenaeus kroyeri) Trawl Fishery of Guyana

Garstin A, Oxenford HA. Reducing Elasmobranch Bycatch in the Atlantic Seabob (Xiphopenaeus kroyeri) Trawl Fishery of Guyana. Gulf and Caribbean Research [Internet]. 2018 :GCFI10 - GCFI20. Available from: https://aquila.usm.edu/gcr/vol29/iss1/4/
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The Atlantic seabob (Xiphopenaeus kroyeri) trawl fishery is very important to Guyana, with 88 licensed industrial vessels harvesting about 15,000 mt annually, representing Guyana’s most valuable seafood export. All vessels are already using both teleost by—catch reduction devices (BRDs) and turtle excluder devices (TEDs) to satisfy international market standards. However, the key stakeholder, the Guyana Association of Private Trawler Owners and Seafood Processors, is now seeking to access sustainable seafood markets through pursuing Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) certification. To this end, this study documents elasmobranch by—catch in the current fishery and examines the effectiveness of a modified TED (with a reduced bar spacing and the addition of a brace bar) in reducing elasmobranch by—catch. From July—August 2014, 131 tows were made, 80 of which represented simultaneous hauls with control and modified TEDs. One shark and 8 ray species were recorded. A statistically significant 40% decline in the elasmobranch catch rate was observed when using modified TEDs compared with control TEDs (mean by—catch rate dropped from 2.3 to 1.4 individuals per twin—trawl/h). Furthermore, modified TEDs significantly reduced the mean size of rays caught by 6.3%. This also resulted in a virtual elimination of 3 IUCN—designated 'Near Threatened' ray species in the by—catch, although having little effect on the capture of small—sized elasmobranch species, including the 'Critically Endangered' Caribbean Electric Ray (Narcine bancroftii). We conclude that the modified TED was successful in reducing the by—catch of vulnerable elasmobranch species and should advance progress towards attaining by—catch standards required for MSC certification.

Using temporally explicit habitat suitability models to assess threats to mobile species and evaluate the effectiveness of marine protected areas

Welch H, Pressey RL, Reside AE. Using temporally explicit habitat suitability models to assess threats to mobile species and evaluate the effectiveness of marine protected areas. Journal for Nature Conservation [Internet]. 2018 ;41:106 - 115. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1617138117303503
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

A principal role of marine protected areas (MPAs) is to mitigate the decline of biodiversity. A key part of this role is to reduce the effects of fisheries on bycatch of vulnerable species. Bycatch can have an impact on species by reducing population sizes, and an ecosystem-level impact through the significant removal of biomass and subsequent trophic changes. In this regard, it is crucial to refine methods for quantifying interactions between fisheries and bycatch species, and to manage these interactions spatially. A new method is presented for quantifying interactions between fisheries and bycatch species at high spatial and temporal resolutions. Temporally explicit species distribution models are used to examine temporal dynamics of fisheries and bycatch. This method is applied to Australia’s Eastern Tuna and Billfish Fishery to estimate interactions with seven principal bycatch species. The ability of MPAs to reduce bycatch is evaluated, and considerations are outlined for the spatial management of fishery-bycatch species interactions. Australia’s Commonwealth Marine Reserve Network had a minimal impact on bycatch reduction under both the 2012 proclaimed and the 2015 panel-recommended zonings. These results highlight the need for threats to marine biodiversity to be incorporated directly into design of MPAs, and for close scrutiny of assumptions that threats will be incidentally abated after MPAs have been proclaimed, or that off-reserve mechanisms will compensate for inadequacies of MPAs.

Conservation Concerns of Small-Scale Fisheries: By-Catch Impacts of a Shrimp and Finfish Fishery in a Sri Lankan Lagoon

Jones BL, Unsworth RKF, Udagedara S, Cullen-Unsworth LC. Conservation Concerns of Small-Scale Fisheries: By-Catch Impacts of a Shrimp and Finfish Fishery in a Sri Lankan Lagoon. Frontiers in Marine Science [Internet]. 2018 ;5. Available from: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2018.00052/full?utm_source=F-AAE&utm_medium=EMLF&utm_campaign=MRK_568639_45_Marine_20180313_arts_A
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

By-catch is considered a significant problem in large-scale fisheries yet in small-scale fisheries (SSF), employing >99% of the world's fishers, there is limited quantitative understanding of by-catch, and catches in general. We provide an assessment of by-catch from fishing gears (fyke, trawl, set trammel, and drift trammel nets) commonly used in small-scale fisheries across the globe, using a representative Sri Lankan case study and placing this in the context of local resource use patterns. We reveal evidence of how SSF generate significant finfish by-catch with potentially significant ecological impacts. Fishers targeting shrimp (fyke, trawl, and drift trammel nets) caught more non-target species than global averages (44, 44, and 67% by weight, respectively). Fishers targeting finfish (set trammel nets) caught fewer non-target species. We found that by-catch depends more on target species and gear type, supporting suggestions that SSF are not “inherently more sustainable” than their large-scale counterparts and a collective effort is required for an improved understanding of the impacts of SSF. This study highlights an additional issue of valuable food fish discards, raising questions about fisheries exploitation in the context of food security in areas where poverty and food insecurity are prevalent.

Mitigating bycatch in tuna fisheries

Hall M, Gilman E, Minami H, Mituhasi T, Carruthers E. Mitigating bycatch in tuna fisheries. Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries [Internet]. 2017 ;27(4):881 - 908. Available from: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11160-017-9478-x
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Monitoring and managing fisheries bycatch is increasingly recognized as a critical component of robust fisheries management frameworks. This review, addressing this subject, begins by defining bycatch and analyzing the reasons it happens, from accidental to intentional discarding. It identifies the most common species composing bycatch of the main tuna fisheries using purse seine and longline gear. Considerations of options available to estimate bycatch, their potential biases and uncertainties, and ways to address these issues are discussed. The formulas used to estimate bycatch also point to the options to reduce them, lowering bycatch per unit of effort or lowering effort itself. It shows that a mean can be reduced by reducing all its component figures, or by eliminating the high values at the extreme of the distribution (i.e., where a small proportion of events causes a large proportion of the problem), a common issue in bycatch. A generic strategy is described that can be applied to all gears and fisheries, and it is then described for the fisheries of interest, showing examples of its application. These cover many mitigation actions based on gear and operational changes. Management options aiming at reducing bycatch are also mentioned. A detailed description of the ways the strategy has been implemented for purse seiners and longliners is provided. Finally, market strategies, education and awareness of stakeholders, mainly fishers, and some potential future developments are briefly described.

Marine mammal population decline linked to obscured by-catch

Meyer S, Robertson BC, B. Chilvers L, Krkošek M. Marine mammal population decline linked to obscured by-catch. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences [Internet]. 2017 :201703165. Available from: http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2017/10/03/1703165114.abstract.html?etoc
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $10.00
Type: Journal Article

Declines of marine megafauna due to fisheries by-catch are thought to be mitigated by exclusion devices that release nontarget species. However, exclusion devices may instead conceal negative effects associated with by-catch caused by fisheries (i.e., unobserved or discarded by-catch with low postrelease survival or reproduction). We show that the decline of the endangered New Zealand (NZ) sea lion (Phocarctos hookeri) is linked to latent levels of by-catch occurring in sub-Antarctic trawl fisheries. Exclusion devices have been used since 2001 but have not slowed or reversed population decline. However, 35% of the variability in NZ sea lion pup production is explained by latent by-catch, and the population would increase without this factor. Our results indicate that exclusion devices can obscure rather than alleviate fishery impacts on marine megafauna.

Fishery-specific solutions to seabird bycatch in the U.S. West Coast sablefish fishery

Gladics AJ, Melvin EF, Suryan RM, Good TP, Jannot JE, Guy TJ. Fishery-specific solutions to seabird bycatch in the U.S. West Coast sablefish fishery. Fisheries Research [Internet]. 2017 ;196:85 - 95. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165783617302291
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Bird scaring lines (BSLs) protect longline fishing gear from seabird attacks, save bait, reduce incidental seabird mortality and are the most commonly prescribed seabird bycatch mitigation measure worldwide. We collaborated with fishermen to assess the efficacy of applying BSL regulations from the demersal longline sablefish fishery in Alaska to a similar fishery along the U.S West Coast. In contrast to Alaska, some U.S. West Coast vessels use floats along the line to keep hooks off the seafloor, where scavengers degrade the bait and the target catch. Our results confirmed that BSL regulations from Alaska were sufficient to protect baits from bird attacks on longlines without floats, but not baits on longlines with floats. Longlines with floats sank below the reach of albatrosses (2 m depth) at a distance astern (157.7 m ± 44.8 95% CI) that was 2.3 times farther than longlines without floats (68.8 m ± 37.8 95% CI). The floated longline distance was well beyond the protection afforded by BSLs, which is approximately 40 m of aerial extent. Black-footed albatross attacked floated longlines at rates ten times more (2.7 attacks/1000 hooks, 0.48–4.45 95%CI) than longlines without floats (0.20 attacks/1000 hooks, 0.01–0.36 95% CI). Retrospective analysis of NOAA Fisheries Groundfish Observer Program data suggested that seabird bycatch occurs in a few sablefish longline fishing sectors and a minority of vessels, but is not confined to larger vessels. Analysis also confirmed fishermen testimonials that night setting reduced albatross bycatch by an order of magnitude compared to daytime setting, without reducing target catch. Night setting could be an effective albatross bycatch prevention practice if applied to the U.S. West Coast sablefish longline fishery and provide a practical alternative for vessels that elect to use floated longlines. These results highlight the importance of understanding region-specific longline gear modifications to identify effective bycatch reduction tools and the value of working collaboratively with fishermen to craft solutions.

Catch as catch can: Targeted and indiscriminate small-scale fishing of seahorses in Vietnam

Stocks AP, Foster SJ, Bat NK, Vincent ACJ. Catch as catch can: Targeted and indiscriminate small-scale fishing of seahorses in Vietnam. Fisheries Research [Internet]. 2017 ;196:27 - 33. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165783617302047
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

Serial depletions and the use of indiscriminate gears have led to increased fishing pressure on many previously untargeted species. A largely unregulated global extraction of seahorses (Hippocampus spp.) has emerged, of which Vietnam is one of the main sources. Quantifying this extraction is a major empirical and enforcement challenge. Using catch landings surveys of small-scale fishing boats, we determined the fishing pressure on seahorse populations around Phu Quoc Island – a major source of seahorses in Vietnam’s trade – from April to July 2014. We focused on two fishing methods, bottom trawling and compressor diving, that either targeted seahorses or caught them incidentally along with a multitude of other species. The seahorse catch consisted of three species – H. kuda, H. spinosissimus and H. trimaculatus – with relative proportions varying by gear type and fishing ground. Fishers that targeted seahorses caught mean rates of 23 and 32 seahorses per boat per day by bottom trawling and diving, respectively. Trawls and divers that did not target seahorses caught mean rates of 1 and 3 seahorses per day respectively, and caught higher proportions of juvenile seahorses. The total catch from the island was approximately 127,000–269,000 seahorses per year from a fleet of 124 trawl boats and 46 compressor diver vessels. This is up to four times higher than the catch of similarly sized fisheries that obtain seahorses and is likely placing high pressure on local seahorse populations. Our research emphasizes the need to monitor these fisheries and develop effective management efforts for sustainable seahorse populations.

Marine reserves solve an important bycatch problem in fisheries

Hastings A, Gaines SD, Costello C. Marine reserves solve an important bycatch problem in fisheries. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences [Internet]. 2017 :201705169. Available from: http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2017/08/08/1705169114
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $10.00
Type: Journal Article

Management of the diverse fisheries of the world has had mixed success. While managing single species in data-rich environments has been largely effective, perhaps the greatest challenge facing fishery managers is how to deal with mixed stocks of fish with a range of life histories that reside in the same location. Because many fishing gears are nonselective, and the costs of making gear selective can be high, a particular problem is bycatch of weak stocks. This problem is most severe when the weak stock is long-lived and has low fecundity and thus requires a very long recovery time once overfished. We investigate the role that marine reserves might play in solving this challenging and ubiquitous problem in ecosystem-based management. Evidence for marine reserves’ potential to manage fisheries in an ecosystem context has been mixed, so we develop a heuristic strategic mathematical model to obtain general conclusions about the merits of managing multispecies fisheries by using reserves relative to managing them with nonspatial approaches. We show that for many fisheries, yields of strong stocks can be increased, and persistence of weak stocks can be ensured, by using marine reserves rather than by using traditional nonspatial approaches alone. Thus, reserves have a distinct advantage as a management tool in many of the most critical multispecies settings. We also show how the West Coast groundfish fishery of the United States meets these conditions, suggesting that management by reserves may be a superior option in that case.

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