Bycatch

Seasonality of strandings and bycatch of harbour porpoises in the Sea of Azov: the effects of fisheries, weather conditions, and life history

Vishnyakova K, Gol'din P. Seasonality of strandings and bycatch of harbour porpoises in the Sea of Azov: the effects of fisheries, weather conditions, and life history. ICES Journal of Marine Science [Internet]. 2015 ;72(3):981 - 991. Available from: http://icesjms.oxfordjournals.org/content/72/3/981.abstract
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

In this study, we analyse seasonal aspects of harbour porpoise strandings in the Sea of Azov and discuss factors affecting the stranding rate. Data on 633 strandings were obtained from monitoring of a 35-km long area of the south coast of the Sea of Azov in 1999–2013. A distinct peak of strandings fell in July and August: it depended on the bycatch peak and calving season. Stranding rates depended neither on weather conditions nor on the seasonal fishing activities (including IUU fisheries). Moreover, stranding peaks in the neighbouring Black Sea were also tied to the calving season rather than to the fishing activities. We suggest that the seasonal mortality patterns are indirectly determined by nutritional stress: in Atlantic, winter-stranding oceanic populations and summer-stranding inner-sea populations occur that also possibly differ in the seasonal dynamics of body mass, weaning time or duration of mother–calf association, and dentine structure. In a typical summer-stranding population, summer is the season of nutritional stress, parturition, independent foraging of yearlings and lactation of nursing females, which leads to the risky foraging behaviour near gillnets. Another possible factor of increased bycatch is the seasonal habitat preference, corresponding to the gillnet preferences. Therefore, stranding and bycatch seasonality of porpoises can largely be explained by the aspects of their life history and foraging behaviour rather than by weather conditions and fisheries. This supports the time–area closure strategy as an adequate conservation measure, which would consider minimizing the conflict of interest with fisheries.

Enhancing the TurtleWatch product for leatherback sea turtles, a dynamic habitat model for ecosystem-based management

Howell EA, Hoover A, Benson SR, Bailey H, Polovina JJ, Seminoff JA, Dutton PH. Enhancing the TurtleWatch product for leatherback sea turtles, a dynamic habitat model for ecosystem-based management. Fisheries Oceanography [Internet]. 2015 . Available from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/fog.12092/abstract
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $38.00
Type: Journal Article

Fishery management measures to reduce interactions between fisheries and endangered or threatened species have typically relied on static time-area closures. While these efforts have reduced interactions, they can be costly and inefficient for managing highly migratory species such as sea turtles. The NOAA TurtleWatch product was created in 2006 as a tool to reduce the rates of interactions of loggerhead sea turtles with shallow-set longline gear deployed by the Hawaii-based pelagic longline fishery targeting swordfish. TurtleWatch provides information on loggerhead habitat and can be used by managers and industry to make dynamic management decisions to potentially reduce incidentally capturing turtles during fishing operations. TurtleWatch is expanded here to include information on endangered leatherback turtles to help reduce incidental capture rates in the central North Pacific. Fishery-dependent data were combined with fishing effort, bycatch and satellite tracking data of leatherbacks to characterize sea surface temperature (SST) relationships that identify habitat or interaction ‘hotspots’. Analysis of SST identified two zones, centered at 17.2° and 22.9°C, occupied by leatherbacks on fishing grounds of the Hawaii-based swordfish fishery. This new information was used to expand the TurtleWatch product to provide managers and industry near real-time habitat information for both loggerheads and leatherbacks. The updated TurtleWatch product provides a tool for dynamic management of the Hawaii-based shallow-set fishery to aid in the bycatch reduction of both species. Updating the management strategy to dynamically adapt to shifts in multi-species habitat use through time is a step towards an ecosystem-based approach to fisheries management in pelagic ecosystems.

Modelling fishers' response to discard prevention strategies: the case of the North Sea saithe fishery

Ruiz J, Batty A, Chavance P, McElderry H, Restrepo V, Sharples P, Santos J, Urtizberea A. Modelling fishers' response to discard prevention strategies: the case of the North Sea saithe fishery. ICES Journal of Marine Science [Internet]. 2014 . Available from: http://icesjms.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2014/12/16/icesjms.fsu229.abstract
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Designing effective management plans requires understanding fishers' behaviour under that plan, because fishers change their behaviour in response to economic and management incentives, which in turn will lead to different fishery outcomes. This study presents a modelling framework for management strategy evaluations which takes into account the response of fishers to management schemes. Based on the upcoming discard ban, two discard prevention strategies were tested for the North Sea saithe fishery, where fleet segments have either no or a generally low quota for cod. Costs and benefits were assessed under the current management, a non-flexible system, where fleet segments had to stop fishing once the cod quota was reached and a flexible system where quota of saithe could be used to cover over-quota catch of cod at a ratio 1:5. The flexible scenario was beneficial both in protecting the North Sea saithe and cod stock and in increasing net profits of fleet segments in the long term. The avoidance behaviour of fleet segments to over-quota catch led to a high SSB level of saithe and cod in the long term, ensuring high long-term catches and profits. A non-flexible scenario had a negative impact on the saithe stock, because mainly juvenile saithe before spawning were caught reducing the spawning-stock biomass in the longer term. A non-flexible scenario was costly in terms of up to 29% lower net profits for individual fleet segments generating little economic incentive to be compliant.

Estimating impacts of the pollock fishery bycatch on western Alaska Chinook salmon

Ianelli JN, Stram DL. Estimating impacts of the pollock fishery bycatch on western Alaska Chinook salmon. ICES Journal of Marine Science [Internet]. 2015 ;72(4):1159 - 1172. Available from: http://icesjms.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/doi/10.1093/icesjms/fsu173
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) are taken as bycatch in the Bering Sea pollock (Gadus chalcogrammus) fishery, with recently revised management measures in place to limit the overall Chinook salmon catch. Historical impact of the bycatch on regional salmon stocks is made difficult because, until recently, sampling for the stock composition of the bycatch was patchy and diverse in approaches. In this study, extensive observer data on the biological attributes (size and age composition) of the bycatch were used to estimate the impact on specific regional stock groups (RSGs), as defined given available genetic stock identification estimates. Our model provides estimates of the impact on Chinook salmon RSGs, given seasonal and spatial variability in the bycatch, and accounts for observed in-river age compositions, uncertainty in age-specific oceanic natural mortality of Chinook salmon, and between-year variability in genetic information. The upper Yukon River stock is transboundary and subject to heightened management interest and international management agreements on escapement goals. Our study updates results from an earlier analysis used to develop the management regulations that went into place in 2011. It shows that the new data result in slight changes in previous estimates, and that the lower overall Chinook salmon bycatch since 2008 has resulted in lower impacts to the main western Alaskan RSGs.

Evaluating the efficacy of salmon bycatch measures using fishery-dependent data

Stram DL, Ianelli JN. Evaluating the efficacy of salmon bycatch measures using fishery-dependent data. ICES Journal of Marine Science [Internet]. 2014 . Available from: http://icesjms.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2014/10/06/icesjms.fsu168.abstract
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The walleye pollock (Gadus chalcogrammus) fishery in the Bering Sea is one of the largest fisheries in the world. The North Pacific Fishery Management Council (NPFMC) provides management advice for this fishery, including the development of measures to minimize salmon bycatch to the extent practicable, one of the stated objectives of the US Magnuson–Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act National Standard Guidelines. Salmon have a unique cultural and nutritional importance in the State of Alaska and are the subject of fully allocated mixed commercial, recreational, and subsistence fisheries. Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) stocks in Alaska have been declining for the last decade, and all sources of mortality are being considered to help in rebuilding stocks. Given the extensive scientific National Marine Fisheries Service observer data collection programme, the NPFMC has developed bycatch management measures that place limits by fishery sector on the allowable catch of Chinook salmon. Part of this programme includes industry-proposed incentive programmes designed to encourage lower bycatch. Evaluating the efficacy of the new measures poses a number of challenges, particularly in light of changing ocean conditions (perhaps affecting the degree of overlap between pollock and salmon). In this study, data on pre- and post-programme implementation were evaluated to determine if the programme is meeting stated goals and objectives or if modifications are needed. These evaluations included consideration of fleet-level bycatch numbers and rates, seasonality of bycatch by sector, and individual vessel bycatch rates. Results suggest that revised management regulations appear to have resulted in reduced bycatch of salmon overall. Also, lower bycatch rates seem to reflect changing behaviour in response to new management measures. However, the extent to which the programme is effective at the vessel level remains difficult to ascertain without explicit vessel-specific benchmarks developed for evaluating programme efficacy.

Strandings, bycatches and injuries of aquatic mammals in China, 2000–2006, as reviewed from official documents: A compelling argument for a nationwide strandings programme

Wang Y, Li W, Van Waerebeek K. Strandings, bycatches and injuries of aquatic mammals in China, 2000–2006, as reviewed from official documents: A compelling argument for a nationwide strandings programme. Marine Policy [Internet]. 2015 ;51:242 - 250. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X14001900
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

In the present study, the species composition, geographical and seasonal patterns of strandings, bycatches and injuries of aquatic mammals reported in Chinese mainland waters, from 2000 to 2006, were analyzed based on national official documents. A total of 97 strandings, 66 bycatches and 30 injuries, involving at least 18 species (possibly 20) in eight families of Cetacea and two families of Carnivora, were recorded. Finless porpoises (Neophocaena spp.), spotted seal (Phoca largha) and bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops spp.) were the most common species in all three categories, in total comprising 59.8% of strandings, 97.0% of bycatches and 86.7% of injuries. Strandings occurred throughout the year, but records of both bycatches and injuries peaked in spring (March to May), corresponding to the major fishing season and may reflect the negative impacts of fishing activities. The highest species diversity found in Fujian Province may be linked to upwelling and high production in the Strait of Taiwan. Serious difficulties were encountered in overall data interpretation and between-provinces comparability, mainly due to a lack of quantified observer effort and variable expertise levels. Hence the establishment of a coordinated nationwide network is recommended, providing a mechanism for the instant reporting of aquatic mammal events, as well as the adoption of a standardised data recording system including necropsy protocols. Better-quality data should allow quantitative analyses leading to an improved understanding of anthropogenic threats in China׳s aquatic mammal populations. The need to upgrade reserve management, such as the Dalian protected area in Liaoning, is also stressed.

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