Climate Change, Ocean Acidification, and Ocean Warming

An End-to-End Model Reveals Losers and Winners in a Warming Mediterranean Sea

Moullec F, Barrier N, Drira S, Guilhaumon F, Marsaleix P, Somot S, Ulses C, Velez L, Shin Y-J. An End-to-End Model Reveals Losers and Winners in a Warming Mediterranean Sea. Frontiers in Marine Science [Internet]. 2019 ;6. Available from: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2019.00345/full?utm_source=F-AAE&utm_medium=EMLF&utm_campaign=MRK_1040055_45_Marine_20190711_arts_A
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The Mediterranean Sea is now recognized as a hotspot of global change, ranking among the fastest warming ocean regions. In order to project future plausible scenarios of marine biodiversity at the scale of the whole Mediterranean basin, the current challenge is to develop an explicit representation of the multispecies spatial dynamics under the combined influence of fishing pressure and climate change. Notwithstanding the advanced state-of-the-art modeling of food webs in the region, no previous studies have projected the consequences of climate change on marine ecosystems in an integrated way, considering changes in ocean dynamics, in phyto- and zoo-plankton productions, shifts in Mediterranean species distributions and their trophic interactions at the whole basin scale. We used an integrated modeling chain including a high-resolution regional climate model, a regional biogeochemistry model and a food web model OSMOSE to project the potential effects of climate change on biomass and catches for a wide array of species in the Mediterranean Sea. We showed that projected climate change would have large consequences for marine biodiversity by the end of the 21st century under a business-as-usual scenario (RCP8.5 with current fishing mortality). The total biomass of high trophic level species (fish and macroinvertebrates) is projected to increase by 5 and 22% while total catch is projected to increase by 0.3 and 7% by 2021–2050 and 2071–2100, respectively. However, these global increases masked strong spatial and inter-species contrasts. The bulk of increase in catch and biomass would be located in the southeastern part of the basin while total catch could decrease by up to 23% in the western part. Winner species would mainly belong to the pelagic group, are thermophilic and/or exotic, of smaller size and of low trophic level while loser species are generally large-sized, some of them of great commercial interest, and could suffer from a spatial mismatch with potential prey subsequent to a contraction or shift of their geographic range. Given the already poor conditions of exploited resources, our results suggest the need for fisheries management to adapt to future changes and to incorporate climate change impacts in future management strategy evaluation.

Biomonitoring acidification using marine gastropods

Marshall DJ, Abdelhady AAwad, Wah DTing Teck, Mustapha N, Gӧdeke SH, De Silva LChandratil, Hall-Spencer JM. Biomonitoring acidification using marine gastropods. Science of The Total Environment [Internet]. 2019 . Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0048969719331547?dgcid=raven_sd_search_email
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $41.95
Type: Journal Article

Ocean acidification is mainly being monitored using data loggers which currently offer limited coverage of marine ecosystems. Here, we trial the use of gastropod shells to monitor acidification on rocky shores. Animals living in areas with highly variable pH (8.6–5.9) were compared with those from sites with more stable pH (8.6–7.9). Differences in site pH were reflected in size, shape and erosion patterns in Nerita chamaeleon and Planaxis sulcatus. Shells from acidified sites were shorter, more globular and more eroded, with both of these species proving to be good biomonitors. After an assessment of baseline weathering, shell erosion can be used to indicate the level of exposure of organisms to corrosive water, providing a tool for biomonitoring acidification in heterogeneous intertidal systems. A shell erosion ranking system was found to clearly discriminate between acidified and reference sites. Being spatially-extensive, this approach can identify coastal areas of greater or lesser acidification. Cost-effective and simple shell erosion ranking is amenable to citizen science projects and could serve as an early-warning-signal for natural or anthropogenic acidification of coastal waters.

Biological interactions: The overlooked aspects of marine climate change refugia

Kavousi J. Biological interactions: The overlooked aspects of marine climate change refugia. Global Change Biology [Internet]. 2019 . Available from: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/gcb.14743
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $42.00
Type: Journal Article

Climate change refugia are currently considered an inseparable part of biological conservation in both marine and terrestrial ecosystems. However, our understanding of marine refugia effectiveness remains limited despite many valuable efforts made in recent years. Certain studies have suggested criteria to assess potential marine climate change refugia (e.g., Kavousi & Keppel, 2018), while others proposed specific refugia to conserve (e.g. Cacciapaglia & van Woesik, 2016 and references therein). While I acknowledge that determining the most effective marine climate change refugia is an urgent necessary action to protect marine biota, I propose that ruling out biological interactions may result in far less accurate estimations of the effectiveness of potential long‐term refugia and short‐term refuges (defined by Keppel et al., 2012) for marine species, which could subsequently lead to overly optimistic ecosystem management strategies.

Temporal transferability of marine distribution models: The role of algorithm selection

de la Hoz CFernández, Ramos E, Puente A, Juanes JAntonio. Temporal transferability of marine distribution models: The role of algorithm selection. Ecological Indicators [Internet]. 2019 ;106:105499. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1470160X19304844
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

Species distribution models (SDMs1) are crucial for guiding management in a changing world. However, limited understanding of algorithm selection, ensemble weights and temporal transferability assessment undermines confidence in their predictions. Transferable predictive models, based on objective and proven selection criteria could therefore provide effective tools for defining species-environment relationships.

This study developed a framework for generating SDMs in the marine environment that improves models’ temporal transferability. The methodological approach steps were: 1) Collection of predictors related to species ecology and their records and species grouping according to their ecological requirements. Twenty-one seaweeds were used as a case study. Environmental and distribution data were divided into two independent periods to evaluate temporal transferability. 2) A model for each species was built in each period with nine algorithms (Generalized Linear Model, Generalized Additive Model, Multivariate Adaptive Regression Spline, Mixture Discriminant Analysis, Classification and Regression Trees, Support Vector Machine, Flexible Discriminant Analysis, Random Forest, MAXENT) and projected into the other period. Predictor contributions to the final models were obtained. 3) Assessment of predictive performance for each model was made using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve and true skill statistics metric for both models’ accuracy and temporal transferability capabilities. All values were over 0.8 for all groups. In turn, the geographical pattern of all models were shown to be ecologically coherent.

The algorithms and their weights that fit best were used to generate transferable models over time in the marine environment and retained for each species. In general, machine learning algorithms produce models with higher sensitivity than regression-based approaches. This methodology sets the scene for further inquiries in the marine environment when developing consistent practices for model development and transferability.

Results are satisfactory for broad application in marine research, allowing a comparative framework between species predictions and facilitating the use of transferable models, especially in climate change studies across large areas. In addition, the proposed methodological approach is a cost-effective tool for dealing with a high number of species in marine environments. All data are freely available, so the methodology can be reproduced for marine researchers with different objectives.

Implications of climate change to the design of protected areas: The case study of small islands (Azores)

Ferreira MTeresa, Cardoso P, Borges PAV, Gabriel R, de Azevedo EBrito, Elias RBento. Implications of climate change to the design of protected areas: The case study of small islands (Azores) Peacock M. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2019 ;14(6):e0218168. Available from: https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0218168
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Climate change is causing shifts in species distributions worldwide. Understanding how species distributions will change with future climate change is thus critical for conservation planning. Impacts on oceanic islands are potentially major given the disproportionate number of endemic species and the consequent risk that local extinctions might become global ones. In this study, we use species climate envelope models to evaluate the current and future potential distributions of Azorean endemic species of bryophytes, vascular plants, and arthropods on the Islands of Terceira and São Miguel in the Azores archipelago (Macaronesia). We examined projections of climate change effects on the future distributions of species with particular focus on the current protected areas. We then used spatial planning optimization software (PRION) to evaluate the effectiveness of protected areas at preserving species both in the present and future. We found that contractions of species distributions in protected areas are more likely in the largest and most populated island of São Miguel, moving from the coastal areas towards inland where the current protected areas are insufficient and inadequate to tackle species distribution shifts. There will be the need for a revision of the current protected areas in São Miguel to allow the sustainable conservation of most species, while in Terceira Island the current protected areas appear to be sufficient. Our study demonstrates the importance of these tools for informing long-term climate change adaptation planning for small islands.

The effect of ocean warming on black sea bass (Centropristis striata) aerobic scope and hypoxia tolerance

Slesinger E, Andres A, Young R, Seibel B, Saba V, Phelan B, Rosendale J, Wieczorek D, Saba G. The effect of ocean warming on black sea bass (Centropristis striata) aerobic scope and hypoxia tolerance Dam HG. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2019 ;14(6):e0218390. Available from: https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0218390
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Over the last decade, ocean temperature on the U.S. Northeast Continental Shelf (U.S. NES) has warmed faster than the global average and is associated with observed distribution changes of the northern stock of black sea bass (Centropristis striata). Mechanistic models based on physiological responses to environmental conditions can improve future habitat suitability projections. We measured maximum, standard metabolic rate, and hypoxia tolerance (Scrit) of the northern adult black sea bass stock to assess performance across the known temperature range of the species. Two methods, chase and swim-flume, were employed to obtain maximum metabolic rate to examine whether the methods varied, and if so, the impact on absolute aerobic scope. A subset of individuals was held at 30°C for one month (30chronic°C) prior to experiments to test acclimation potential. Absolute aerobic scope (maximum–standard metabolic rate) reached a maximum of 367.21 mgO2 kg-1 hr-1 at 24.4°C while Scrit continued to increase in proportion to standard metabolic rate up to 30°C. The 30chronic°C group exhibited a significantly lower maximum metabolic rate and absolute aerobic scope in relation to the short-term acclimated group, but standard metabolic rate or Scrit were not affected. This suggests a decline in performance of oxygen demand processes (e.g. muscle contraction) beyond 24°C despite maintenance of oxygen supply. The Metabolic Index, calculated from Scrit as an estimate of potential aerobic scope, closely matched the measured factorial aerobic scope (maximum / standard metabolic rate) and declined with increasing temperature to a minimum below 3. This may represent a critical threshold value for the species. With temperatures on the U.S. NES projected to increase above 24°C in the next 80-years in the southern portion of the northern stock’s range, it is likely black sea bass range will continue to shift poleward as the ocean continues to warm.

An integrative climate change vulnerability index for Arctic aviation and marine transportation

Debortoli NS, Clark DG, Ford JD, Sayles JS, Diaconescu EP. An integrative climate change vulnerability index for Arctic aviation and marine transportation. Nature Communications [Internet]. 2019 ;10(1). Available from: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-019-10347-1
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Climate change vulnerability research methods are often divergent, drawing from siloed biophysical risk approaches or social-contextual frameworks, lacking methods for integrative approaches. This substantial gap has been noted by scientists, policymakers and communities, inhibiting decision-makers’ capacity to implement adaptation policies responsive to both physical risks and social sensitivities. Aiming to contribute to the growing literature on integrated vulnerability approaches, we conceptualize and translate new integrative theoretical insights of vulnerability research to a scalable quantitative method. Piloted through a climate change vulnerability index for aviation and marine sectors in the Canadian Arctic, this study demonstrates an avenue of applying vulnerability concepts to assess both biophysical and social components analyzing future changes with linked RCP climate projections. The iterative process we outline is transferable and adaptable across the circumpolar north, as well as other global regions and shows that transportation vulnerability varies across Inuit regions depending on modeled hazards and transportation infrastructures.

An Enhanced Ocean Acidification Observing Network: From People to Technology to Data Synthesis and Information Exchange

Tilbrook B, Jewett EB, DeGrandpre MD, Hernandez-Ayon JMartin, Feely RA, Gledhill DK, Hansson L, Isensee K, Kurz ML, Newton JA, et al. An Enhanced Ocean Acidification Observing Network: From People to Technology to Data Synthesis and Information Exchange. Frontiers in Marine Science [Internet]. 2019 ;6. Available from: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2019.00337/full?utm_source=F-AAE&utm_medium=EMLF&utm_campaign=MRK_1023338_45_Marine_20190625_arts_A
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

A successful integrated ocean acidification (OA) observing network must include (1) scientists and technicians from a range of disciplines from physics to chemistry to biology to technology development; (2) government, private, and intergovernmental support; (3) regional cohorts working together on regionally specific issues; (4) publicly accessible data from the open ocean to coastal to estuarine systems; (5) close integration with other networks focusing on related measurements or issues including the social and economic consequences of OA; and (6) observation-based informational products useful for decision making such as management of fisheries and aquaculture. The Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network (GOA-ON), a key player in this vision, seeks to expand and enhance geographic extent and availability of coastal and open ocean observing data to ultimately inform adaptive measures and policy action, especially in support of the United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. GOA-ON works to empower and support regional collaborative networks such as the Latin American Ocean Acidification Network, supports new scientists entering the field with training, mentorship, and equipment, refines approaches for tracking biological impacts, and stimulates development of lower-cost methodology and technologies allowing for wider participation of scientists. GOA-ON seeks to collaborate with and complement work done by other observing networks such as those focused on carbon flux into the ocean, tracking of carbon and oxygen in the ocean, observing biological diversity, and determining short- and long-term variability in these and other ocean parameters through space and time.

Effects of Ocean Acidification on Marine Photosynthetic Organisms Under the Concurrent Influences of Warming, UV Radiation, and Deoxygenation

Gao K, Beardall J, Häder D-P, Hall-Spencer JM, Gao G, Hutchins DA. Effects of Ocean Acidification on Marine Photosynthetic Organisms Under the Concurrent Influences of Warming, UV Radiation, and Deoxygenation. Frontiers in Marine Science [Internet]. 2019 ;6. Available from: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2019.00322/full?utm_source=F-AAE&utm_medium=EMLF&utm_campaign=MRK_1023338_45_Marine_20190625_arts_A
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The oceans take up over 1 million tons of anthropogenic CO2 per hour, increasing dissolved pCO2 and decreasing seawater pH in a process called ocean acidification (OA). At the same time greenhouse warming of the surface ocean results in enhanced stratification and shoaling of upper mixed layers, exposing photosynthetic organisms dwelling there to increased visible and UV radiation as well as to a decreased nutrient supply. In addition, ocean warming and anthropogenic eutrophication reduce the concentration of dissolved O2 in seawater, contributing to the spread of hypoxic zones. All of these global changes interact to affect marine primary producers. Such interactions have been documented, but to a much smaller extent compared to the responses to each single driver. The combined effects could be synergistic, neutral, or antagonistic depending on species or the physiological processes involved as well as experimental setups. For most calcifying algae, the combined impacts of acidification, solar UV, and/or elevated temperature clearly reduce their calcification; for diatoms, elevated CO2 and light levels interact to enhance their growth at low levels of sunlight but inhibit it at high levels. For most photosynthetic nitrogen fixers (diazotrophs), acidification associated with elevated CO2may enhance their N2 fixation activity, but interactions with other environmental variables such as trace metal availability may neutralize or even reverse these effects. Macroalgae, on the other hand, either as juveniles or adults, appear to benefit from elevated CO2 with enhanced growth rates and tolerance to lowered pH. There has been little documentation of deoxygenation effects on primary producers, although theoretically elevated CO2and decreased O2 concentrations could selectively enhance carboxylation over oxygenation catalyzed by ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase and thereby benefit autotrophs. Overall, most ocean-based global change biology studies have used single and/or double stressors in laboratory tests. This overview examines the combined effects of OA with other features such as warming, solar UV radiation, and deoxygenation, focusing on primary producers.

Fisheries and Climate Change: Legal and Management Implications

Farady SE, Bigford TE. Fisheries and Climate Change: Legal and Management Implications. Fisheries [Internet]. 2019 ;44(6):270 - 275. Available from: https://afspubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/fsh.10263
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $42.00
Type: Journal Article

Many U.S. marine fisheries are showing the impacts of climate change. Some species are shifting outside their historical range in response to changing ecosystem conditions, especially warming waters, but also to changing habitats and ocean acidification. This new reality poses challenges to our current management regimes as fish and fishermen move, sometimes into areas dedicated to different historical uses or new ventures. This Perspective will explore how our current fishery management system is being tested by climate change impacts, the efforts underway to adapt science and management to a new normal in the ocean, the constraints of current law, and ideas for future law and regulation that is designed to enable management under climate‐changed conditions.

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