Coastal and Offshore Energy

Food safety during seaweed cultivation at offshore wind farms: An exploratory study in the North Sea

Banach JL, van den Burg SWK, van der Fels-Klerx HJ. Food safety during seaweed cultivation at offshore wind farms: An exploratory study in the North Sea. Marine Policy [Internet]. 2020 ;120:104082. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X20301500
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Multi-use in ocean space, and seas, entails the co-location of different industries or technologies and their corresponding activities that take place at the same time in a specific location. This concept focuses on finding solutions to tackle global challenges in food security. However, the effects that seaweed cultivation at offshore wind farms may have on food and feed safety are less readily addressed. This study examined whether currently available food and feed safety standards for seaweed can be applied to multi-use activities at sea. The focus was on the combined use of seaweed cultivation at an offshore wind farm in the North Sea. Literature regarding hazards in seaweed was screened, and standards were evaluated. Expert elicitation on seaweed cultivation was retrieved via in-depth interviews and a workshop. Results showed that although some food safety hazards may be more apparent for seaweed cultivation such as toxic metals (e.g., arsenic, cadmium) and iodine, others may become relevant when considering multi-use (e.g., allergens, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, toxic metabolites). Key factors for food safety include the location of seaweed cultivation, handling and processing of seaweed, and seaweed testing. Public standards, the Food Safety System Certification 22000 standard, and the Marine Stewardship Council/Aquaculture Stewardship Council standard are recommended for the food and marine sectors to consider when determining standards to implement. This case study provides an example of how to address seaweed food and feed safety in a multi-use scenario in the North Sea. We recommend additional case studies for other multi-use at sea scenarios.

Resource Niches of Co-occurring Invertebrate Species at an Offshore Wind Turbine Indicate a Substantial Degree of Trophic Plasticity

Mavraki N, De Mesel I, Degraer S, Moens T, Vanaverbeke J. Resource Niches of Co-occurring Invertebrate Species at an Offshore Wind Turbine Indicate a Substantial Degree of Trophic Plasticity. Frontiers in Marine Science [Internet]. 2020 ;7. Available from: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2020.00379/full?utm_source=F-AAE&utm_medium=EMLF&utm_campaign=MRK_1348443_45_Marine_20200609_arts_A
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Offshore wind farms (OWFs) in the North Sea are proliferating, causing alterations in local ecosystems by adding artificial hard substrates into naturally soft-bottom areas. These substrates are densely colonized by fouling organisms, which may compete for the available resources. While the distribution of some species is restricted to specific parts of the turbine, others occur across depth zones and may therefore face different competitive environments. Here we investigate the trophic niches of seven invertebrate species: three sessile (Diadumene cinctaMetridium senile, and Mytilus edulis), one hemi-sessile (Jassa herdmani) and three mobile species (Ophiothrix fragilisNecora puber, and Pisidia longicornis) that occur in multiple depth zones. We hypothesized that these species would be trophic generalists, exhibiting trophic plasticity by selecting different resources in different depth zones, to cope with the different competitive environments in which they occur. We analyzed δ13C and δ15N of these species and their potential resources across depth zones. Our results show that most of these invertebrates are indeed trophic generalists which display substantial trophic plasticity, selecting different resources in different zones. Degree of trophic plasticity was not related to mobility of the species. There are two possible explanations for these dietary changes with depth: either consumers switch diet to avoid competition with other (dominant) species, or they benefit from the consumption of a non-limiting resource. Only Diadumene cincta was a trophic specialist that consumed suspended particulate organic matter (SPOM) independent of its zone of occurrence. Altogether, trophic plasticity appears an important mechanism for the co-existence of invertebrate species along the depth gradient of an offshore wind turbine.

How to model social-ecological systems? – A case study on the effects of a future offshore wind farm on the local society and ecosystem, and whether social compensation matters

Haraldsson M, Raoux A, Riera F, Hay J, Dambacher JM, Niquil N. How to model social-ecological systems? – A case study on the effects of a future offshore wind farm on the local society and ecosystem, and whether social compensation matters. Marine Policy [Internet]. 2020 ;119:104031. Available from: 10.1016/j.marpol.2020.104031
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Models of social-ecological systems (SES) are acknowledged as an important tool to understand human-nature relations. However, many SES models fail to integrate adequate information from both the human and ecological subsystems. With an example model of a future Offshore Wind Farm development and its effects on both the ecosystem and local human population, we illustrate a method facilitating a “balanced” SES model, in terms of including information from both subsystems. We use qualitative mathematical modeling, which allows to quickly analyze the structure and dynamics of a system without including quantitative data, and therefore to compare alternative system structures based on different understandings of how the system works. By including similar number of system variables in the two subsystems, we balanced the complexity between them. Our analyses show that this complexity is important in order to predict indirect and sometimes counterintuitive effects. We also highlight some conceptually important questions concerning social compensations during developmental projects in general, and wind farms in particular. Our results suggest that the more project holders get involved in various manner in the local socio-ecological system, the more society will benefit as a whole. Increased involvement through e.g. new projects or job-opportunities around the windfarm has the capacity to offset the negative effects of the windfarm on the local community. These benefits are enhanced when there is an overall acceptance and appropriation of the project. We suggest this method as a tool to support the decision-making process and to facilitate discussions between stakeholders, especially among local communities.

Governing Risks of Multi-Use: Seaweed Aquaculture at Offshore Wind Farms

van den Burg SWK, Röckmann C, Banach JL, van Hoof L. Governing Risks of Multi-Use: Seaweed Aquaculture at Offshore Wind Farms. Frontiers in Marine Science [Internet]. 2020 ;7. Available from: https://www.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fmars.2020.00060/full
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Spatial claims concerning the rapidly growing European offshore wind sector give rise to various ideas for the multi-use application of wind farms. Seaweed is considered a promising feedstock for food and feed that could be produced at offshore wind farms. Concerns about risks resulting in liability claims and insurance premiums are often seen as show-stoppers to multi-use at offshore wind farms. In this study, key environmental risks of seaweed cultivation at offshore wind farms, identified through literature review, are characterized based on stakeholder consultation. The current approach to risk governance is evaluated to assess how it can handle the uncertain, complex, and/or ambiguous risks of multi-use. It is concluded that current risk governance for multi-use is poorly equipped to deal with the systemic nature of risks. Risk governance should be a joint effort of governments and private regulators. It can improve if it is based on an adaptive framework for risk assessment that can deal with complex, systemic risks. Furthermore, it should be flexible and inclusive, i.e., open to new incoming information and stakeholder input, and taking into account and communicate about the different stakes and values of the various parties involved. The importance of communication and inclusion must be recognized, which promotes participation of concerned stakeholders.

Spatio-Temporal Assessment of Climate Change Impact on Wave Energy Resources Using Various Time Dependent Criteria

Kamranzad B, Lavidas G, Takara K. Spatio-Temporal Assessment of Climate Change Impact on Wave Energy Resources Using Various Time Dependent Criteria. Energies [Internet]. 2020 ;13(3):768. Available from: https://www.mdpi.com/1996-1073/13/3/768
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The wave energy resources in the Indian Ocean can be considered as a potential alternative to fossil fuels. However, the wave energy resources are subject to short-term fluctuations and long-term changes due to climate change. Hence, considering sustainable development goals, it is necessary to assess both short-term (intra-annual) variation and long-term change. For this purpose, the simulated wave characteristics were utilized, and the wave power and its variation and change were analyzed in the whole domain and nearshore areas. The short-term fluctuation was investigated in terms of monthly and seasonal variations and the future change was discussed based on absolute and relative changes. Both analyses show that the Southern Indian Ocean, despite experiencing extreme events and having higher wave energy potential, is more stable in terms of both short and long-term variation and change. The assessment of the total and exploitable storages of wave energy and their future change revealed the higher potential and higher stability of the nearshores of the Southern Indian Ocean. It can be concluded that based on various factors, the south of Sri Lanka, Horn of Africa, southeast Africa, south of Madagascar and Reunion and Mauritius islands are the most suitable areas for wave energy extraction.

A Spatial Analysis of the Potentials for Offshore Wind Farm Locations in the North Sea Region: Challenges and Opportunities

Gusatu LFlorentina, Yamu C, Zuidema C, Faaij A. A Spatial Analysis of the Potentials for Offshore Wind Farm Locations in the North Sea Region: Challenges and Opportunities. ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information [Internet]. 2020 ;9(2):96. Available from: https://www.mdpi.com/2220-9964/9/2/96
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Over the last decade, the accelerated transition towards cleaner means of producing energy has been clearly prioritised by the European Union through large-scale planned deployment of wind farms in the North Sea. From a spatial planning perspective, this has not been a straight-forward process, due to substantial spatial conflicts with the traditional users of the sea, especially with fisheries and protected areas. In this article, we examine the availability of offshore space for wind farm deployment, from a transnational perspective, while taking into account different options for the management of the maritime area through four scenarios. We applied a mixed-method approach, combining expert knowledge and document analysis with the spatial visualisation of existing and future maritime spatial claims. Our calculations clearly indicate a low availability of suitable locations for offshore wind in the proximity of the shore and in shallow waters, even when considering its multi-use with fisheries and protected areas. However, the areas within 100 km from shore and with a water depth above –120 m attract greater opportunities for both single use (only offshore wind farms) and multi-use (mainly with fisheries), from an integrated planning perspective. On the other hand, the decrease of energy targets combined with sectoral planning result in clear limitations to suitable areas for offshore wind farms, indicating the necessity to consider areas with a water depth below –120 m and further than 100 km from shore. Therefore, despite the increased costs of maintenance and design adaptation, the multi-use of space can be a solution for more sustainable, stakeholder-engaged and cost-effective options in the energy deployment process. This paper identifies potential pathways, as well as challenges and opportunities for future offshore space management with the aim of achieving the 2050 renewable energy targets.

Regulating Offshore Energy: Europe as a Model for Regulation

Wright A. Regulating Offshore Energy: Europe as a Model for Regulation. North Carolina Journal of International Law [Internet]. 2019 :69-110. Available from: https://scholarship.law.unc.edu/ncilj/vol45/iss4/4
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Although the regime for managing oceans and offshore energy development are complex internationally and within the United States, some regulatory structures have proven to be both successful and adaptable in a changing energy landscape. The European Union provides a useful model for regional collaboration and marine planning, a model that could be adapted to the United States to ensure sustainable marine management as more offshore lands are opened to energy development. Many of the structures that would encourage this development have already begun to form within the United States, enabling the exact kinds of management embraced by the European model.

Understanding community acceptance of a potential offshore wind energy project in different locations: An island-based analysis of ‘place-technology fit’

Devine-Wright P, Wiersma B. Understanding community acceptance of a potential offshore wind energy project in different locations: An island-based analysis of ‘place-technology fit’. Energy Policy [Internet]. In Press :111086. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0301421519306731
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $19.95
Type: Journal Article

Understanding the factors influencing community acceptance of renewable energy projects such as offshore wind farms is important for achieving a transition to low carbon energy sources. However, to date community acceptance research has concentrated on responses to actual proposals, seeking to explain local objections. ‘Upstream’ research that investigates the ‘place-technology fit’ of a potential renewable energy project before it is proposed is scarce, yet can inform technology deployment by taking local knowledge and preferences into account. We address this gap in a study conducted in Guernsey, Channel Islands. Data was collected using a survey (n = 468) co-designed with island policy makers presenting technical, economic and locational details of a potential offshore wind project. Results show that acceptance of the same project design differed significantly across alternative development locations. Regression analyses compared the roles of personal, context and project-related factors in explaining acceptance for each site. Support for using wind energy for local electricity supply was the most important predictor of acceptance, and this variable mediated the relationship between island energy security and community acceptance. We conclude that place matters for community acceptance and that security and autonomy are co-benefits of local renewable energy projects that deserve further research.

Estimating the optimum size of a tidal array at a multi-inlet system considering environmental and performance constraints

González-Gorbeña E, Pacheco A, Plomaritis TA, Ferreira Ó, Sequeira C. Estimating the optimum size of a tidal array at a multi-inlet system considering environmental and performance constraints. Applied Energy [Internet]. 2018 ;232:292 - 311. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0306261918315216
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $41.95
Type: Journal Article

This paper investigates the optimum tidal energy converter array density at a tidal inlet by applying surrogate-based optimisation. The SBO procedure comprises problem formulation, design of experiments, numerical simulations, surrogate model construction and constrained optimisation. This study presents an example for the Faro-Olhão Inlet in the Ria Formosa (Portugal), a potential site for tidal in-stream energy extraction. A 35 kW Evopod™ floating tidal energy converter from Oceanflow Energy Ltd. has been used for array size calculations considering two design variables: (1) number of array rows, and (2) number of tidal energy converter per row. Arrays up to 13 rows with 6–11 tidal energy converters each are studied to assess their impacts on array performance, inlets discharges and bathymetry changes. The analysis identified the positive/negative feedbacks between the two design variables in real case complex flow fields under variable bathymetry and channel morphology. The non-uniformity of tidal currents along the array region causes the variability of the resource in each row, as well as makes it difficult to predict the resultant array configuration interactions. Four different multi-objective optimisation models are formulated subject to a set of performance and environmental constraints. Results from the optimisation models imply that the largest array size that meets the environmental constraints is made of 5 rows with 6 tidal energy converter each and an overall capacity factor of 11.6% resulting in an energy production of 1.01 GWh year−1. On the other hand, a higher energy production (1.20 GWh year−1) is achieved by an optimum array configuration, made of 3 rows with 10 tidal energy converters per row, which maximises power output satisfying environmental and performance restrictions. This optimal configuration permits a good level of energy extraction while having a reduced effect on the hydrodynamic functioning of the multi-inlet system. These results prove the suitability and the potential wide use of the surrogate-based optimisation method to define array characteristics that enhance power production and at the same time respect the environmental surrounding conditions.

From strategic marine planning to project licences – Striking a balance between predictability and adaptability in the management of aquaculture and offshore wind farms

Schütz SEskeland, Slater A-M. From strategic marine planning to project licences – Striking a balance between predictability and adaptability in the management of aquaculture and offshore wind farms. Marine Policy [Internet]. In Press :103556. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X19303215
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

Renewable energy and sustainable food production are high on the international agenda, as is the prospect of expanding activity northwards to Arctic waters. In this article, we review core elements of the marine governance systems for aquaculture facilities and offshore wind farms in Norway and Scotland. Management of these sectors through strategic planning, marine spatial planning and licensing systems furthers rule of law values such as stability and predictability, making investment less risky. The review illustrates how the governance systems also facilitate flexibility and adaptability, balancing predictability considerations against the need to adapt management to natural and economic changes and innovative technologies, or even effective multi-use. This article discusses what endeavours have been made to strike a balance between predictability and adaptability in these sectors in Norway and Scotland. This study of marine management regimes in the Arctic and northern parts of the Temperate Northern Atlantic, and the values underpinning these regimes, provides lessons for the future of the Arctic.

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