Coastal and Offshore Energy

The impact of seabed rock roughness on tidal stream power extraction

Guillou N, Thiébot J. The impact of seabed rock roughness on tidal stream power extraction. Energy [Internet]. 2016 ;112:762 - 773. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0360544216308271
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Numerical assessments of environmental disturbances induced by a tidal farm project rely usually on local modifications of the friction coefficient over the area covered by a proposed array. Nevertheless, no study has investigated the sensitivity of predictions to surrounding seabed friction. The present investigation focuses on impacts of roughness parameterisation of rock outcrops, a typical seabed of tidal stream sites. A high-resolution depth-averaged circulation model is implemented in the Fromveur Strait off western Brittany, a region with strong potential for array development, integrating the heterogeneity of sediment bottom types. Rock roughness strongly influences initial predictions of tidal current and kinetic energy in the Strait with variations of available power up to 30 %. Tidal energy extraction induces noticeable reductions of tidal currents and bottom shear stresses up to 15 km from the array considered till surrounding sandbanks. Rock roughness impacts farm-induced modifications of tidal currents, bottom shear stresses and stream powers till north-eastern and southward edges of the Strait with major absolute differences identified in its central part. Surrounding sandbanks are finally suggested to variations of shear stresses from 9 to 17 % over the Bank of the Four with possible implications on local sediment deposition.

Achieving Blue Growth through maritime spatial planning: Offshore wind energy optimization and biodiversity conservation in Spain

Rodríguez-Rodríguez D, D. Malak A, Soukissian T, Sánchez-Espinosa A. Achieving Blue Growth through maritime spatial planning: Offshore wind energy optimization and biodiversity conservation in Spain. Marine Policy [Internet]. 2016 ;73:8 - 14. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X16303517
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Spain has a high potential for renewable energy production, being the world's third country by installed on-shore wind power. However, it has not yet fully developed its renewable energy production capacity, with no commercial offshore wind production to date, and remains highly dependent on fossil fuel imports. The country is also one of Europe's most biodiverse, on land and at sea. This study spatially assesses the country's offshore wind energy potential by incorporating the newly designated marine protected areas (MPAs) to the official Spanish strategic environmental assessment for the installation of offshore windfarms (SEA). It also identifies optimal areas for offshore windfarm development according to key physical variables such as wind speed, depth and substrate type. It finally assesses real commercial windfarm projects against current environmental constraints. The results show that nearly 50% of the whole area within 24 nm from the Spanish coast could be suitable for offshore windfarm development at the planning phase. However, only 0.7% of that area is optimal for wind energy production with current fixed turbine technology. Nevertheless, either area would allow Spain to meet its national targets of 750 MW of ocean power capacity installed by 2020 under adequate local wind conditions. Over 88% of all commercial windfarm project area is within the SEA's Exclusion zone, thus unfeasible under current circumstances. Technological breakthroughs like floating turbines may soon make the optimal windfarm area (OWA) less restrictive and reduce current environmental impacts of marine windfarms within a truly sustainable Blue Growth.

Coexistence dilemmas in European marine spatial planning practices. The case of marine renewables and marine protected areas

Kyriazi Z, Maes F, Degraer S. Coexistence dilemmas in European marine spatial planning practices. The case of marine renewables and marine protected areas. Energy Policy [Internet]. 2016 ;97:391 - 399. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0301421516303706
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The question whether coexistence of marine renewable energy (MRE) projects and marine protected areas (MPAs) is a common spatial policy in Europe and how a number of factors can affect it, has been addressed by empirical research undertaken in eleven European marine areas. Policy drivers and objectives that are assumed to affect coexistence, such as the fulfillment of conservation objectives and the prioritization of other competing marine uses, were scored by experts and predictions were crosschecked with state practice. While in most areas MRE-MPA coexistence is not prohibited by law, practice indicates resistance towards it. Furthermore expert judgment demonstrated that a number of additional factors, such as the lack of suitable space for MRE projects and the uncertainty about the extent of damage by MRE to the MPA, might influence the intentions of the two major parties involved (i.e. the MRE developer and the MPA authority) to pursue or avoid coexistence. Based on these findings, the interactions of these two players are further interpreted, their policy implications are discussed, while the need towards efficient, fair and acceptable MRE-MPA coexistence is highlighted.

Developing benefit schemes and financial compensation measures for fishermen impacted by marine renewable energy projects

Reilly K, O’Hagan AMarie, Dalton G. Developing benefit schemes and financial compensation measures for fishermen impacted by marine renewable energy projects. Energy Policy [Internet]. 2016 ;97:161 - 170. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0301421516303950
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Commercial fishermen are arguably the stakeholder group most likely to be directly impacted by the expansion of the marine renewable energy (MRE) sector. The potential opposition of fishermen may hinder the development of MRE projects and the provision of benefit schemes could to enhance acceptance. Benefit schemes refer to additional voluntary measures that are provided by a developer to local stakeholders. The aim of this study is to explore the issue of the provision of benefit packages to local fishing communities and financial compensation measures for fishermen who may be impacted by MRE projects. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with fourteen fishermen from three separate case study sites around the island of Ireland where MRE projects were being developed. In addition, ten company fisheries liaison officers (CFLOs) who have worked on MRE projects in the UK and Ireland were also interviewed. The interviews were analysed under the headings of local employment, benefits in kind, compensation and community funds and ownership of projects. Analysis shows that there is uncertainty among fishermen over whether they would benefit or gain employment from MRE. Provision of re-training schemes and preferential hiring practices could be used by MRE developers to reduce this uncertainty. There was also agreement between fishermen and CFLOs on the need for the provision of an evidence-base and a standard approach for the calculation of disruption payments. A formal structure for the provision of benefit schemes for fishermen would be useful. Furthermore, schemes that provide a range of benefits to fishermen and other stakeholders over the lifetime of a MRE project are more likely to be successful at enhancing acceptance.

Co-located wind and wave energy farms: Uniformly distributed arrays

Astariz S, Iglesias G. Co-located wind and wave energy farms: Uniformly distributed arrays. Energy [Internet]. 2016 ;113:497 - 508. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S036054421630994X
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Co-located wave and wind energy farms can serve to tackle one of the downsides of offshore wind energy relative to its onshore counterpart: the longer non-operational periods. These are partly caused by delays to maintenance tasks due to energetic sea states preventing access. By co-locating Wave Energy Converters (WECs) in an appropriate configuration it may be possible to reduce the wave heights within the wind farm area (shielding effect) and thereby increase the weather windows for maintenance. Previous works analysed the improvements in accessibility obtained by configuring the co-located WECs as a peripheral barrier or interspersed within the farm. However, the former led to an insufficient wave height reduction as the distance to the barrier increased and the latter presented other handicaps, notably in respect of the submarine cable installation and the navigation of workboats. The objectives of this work are: (i) to analyse whether a uniformly distributed array may be more convenient in these respects and (ii) to carry out a comparative economic assessment. This investigation is carried out through a case study at the Horns Rev 1 wind farm by means of a high-resolution spectral wave model. Annual cost savings of up to 900,000 € are found.

GIS-Based Wind Farm Site Selection Model Offshore Abu Dhabi Emirate, UAE

Saleous N, Issa S, J. Mazrouei A. GIS-Based Wind Farm Site Selection Model Offshore Abu Dhabi Emirate, UAE. ISPRS - International Archives of the Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing and Spatial Information Sciences [Internet]. 2016 ;XLI-B8:437 - 441. Available from: http://www.int-arch-photogramm-remote-sens-spatial-inf-sci.net/XLI-B8/437/2016/
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The United Arab Emirates (UAE) government has declared the increased use of alternative energy a strategic goal and has invested in identifying and developing various sources of such energy. This study aimed at assessing the viability of establishing wind farms offshore the Emirate of Abu Dhabi, UAE and to identify favourable sites for such farms using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) procedures and algorithms. Based on previous studies and on local requirements, a set of suitability criteria was developed including ocean currents, reserved areas, seabed topography, and wind speed. GIS layers were created and a weighted overlay GIS model based on the above mentioned criteria was built to identify suitable sites for hosting a new offshore wind energy farm. Results showed that most of Abu Dhabi offshore areas were unsuitable, largely due to the presence of restricted zones (marine protected areas, oil extraction platforms and oil pipelines in particular). However, some suitable sites could be identified, especially around Delma Island and North of Jabal Barakah in the Western Region. The environmental impact of potential wind farm locations and associated cables on the marine ecology was examined to ensure minimal disturbance to marine life. Further research is needed to specify wind mills characteristics that suit the study area especially with the presence of heavy traffic due to many oil production and shipping activities in the Arabian Gulf most of the year.

Multi-criteria evaluation of wave energy projects on the south-east Australian coast

Flocard F, Ierodiaconou D, Coghlan IR. Multi-criteria evaluation of wave energy projects on the south-east Australian coast. Renewable Energy [Internet]. 2016 ;99:80 - 94. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0960148116305602
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

In the last decade, multiple studies focusing on national-scale assessments of the ocean wave energy resource in Australia identified the Southern Margin to be one of the most energetic areas worldwide suitable for the extraction of wave energy for electricity production. While several companies have deployed single unit devices, the next phase of development will most likely be the deployment of parks with dozens of units, introducing the risk of conflicts within the marine space.

This paper presents a geo-spatial multi-criteria evaluation approach to identify optimal locations to deploy a wave energy farm while minimizing potential conflicts with other coastal and offshore users. The methodology presented is based around five major criteria: ocean wave climatology, nature of the seabed, distance to key infrastructure, environmental factors and potential conflict with other users such as shipping and fisheries.

A case study is presented for an area off the south-east Australian coast using a total of 18 physical, environmental and socio-economic parameters. The spatial restrictions associated with environmental factors, wave climate, as well as conflict of use, resulted in an overall exclusion of 20% of the study area. Highly suitable areas identified ranged between 11 and 34% of the study area based on scenarios with varying criteria weighting. By spatially comparing different scenarios we identified persistence of a highly suitable area of 700 km2 off the coast of Portland across all model domains investigated. We demonstrate the value of incorporation spatial information at the scale relevant to resource exploitation when examining multiple criteria for optimal site selection of Wave Energy Converters over broad geographic regions.

Next Steps to Reform the Regulations Governing Offshore Oil and Gas Planning and Leasing

Hartsig A, Levine M, Hein JFoley, Schwartz J. Next Steps to Reform the Regulations Governing Offshore Oil and Gas Planning and Leasing. Alaska Law Review [Internet]. 2016 ;33(1). Available from: http://alr.law.duke.edu/article/next-steps-to-reform-the-regulations-governing-offshore-oil-and-gas-planning-and-leasing-hartsig-vol33-iss1/
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The Department of the Interior manages offshore oil and gas activities in federal waters. While the agency has proposed and/or enacted important improvements to the rules that govern some of those activities, it has not modernized the regulations that govern offshore oil and gas planning, lease sales, or the review and permitting of exploratory drilling. These phases of the process are overseen by the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), and, as was shown in our earlier publication on this topic, are ineffective and in need of modernization. In this Article, we argue that fundamental reform is necessary and highlight a series of key themes and topics that must be addressed to improve the regulatory process and promote better, more consistent management outcomes. While the Article draws on examples from frontier areas—in particular the U.S. Arctic Ocean—the recommended changes would apply to and benefit all areas of the OCS.

Prediction and optimization of wave energy converter arrays using a machine learning approach

Sarkar D, Contal E, Vayatis N, Dias F. Prediction and optimization of wave energy converter arrays using a machine learning approach. Renewable Energy [Internet]. 2016 ;97:504 - 517. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0960148116304931
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Optimization of the layouts of arrays of wave energy converters (WECs) is a challenging problem. The hydrodynamic analysis and performance estimation of such systems are performed using semi-analytical and numerical models such as the boundary element method. However, the analysis of an array of such converters becomes computationally expensive, and the computational time increases rapidly with the number of devices in the system. As such determination of optimal layouts of WECs in arrays becomes extremely difficult. In this paper, a methodology involving multiple optimization strategies is presented to arrive at the solution to the complex problem. The approach includes a statistical emulator to predict the performance of the WECs in arrays, followed by an innovative active learning strategy to simultaneously explore and focus in regions of interest of the problem, and finally a genetic algorithm to obtain the optimal layouts of WECs. The method is extremely fast and easily scalable to arrays of any size. Case studies are performed on a wavefarm comprising of 40 WECs subject to arbitrary bathymetry and space constraints.

Development of a Multi-Site and Multi-Device Webgis-Based Tool for Tidal Current Energy Development

Ang MRCO, Panganiban IK, Mamador CC, De Luna ODG, Bausas MD, Cruz JP. Development of a Multi-Site and Multi-Device Webgis-Based Tool for Tidal Current Energy Development. ISPRS Annals of Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing and Spatial Information Sciences [Internet]. 2016 ;III-8:65 - 70. Available from: http://www.isprs-ann-photogramm-remote-sens-spatial-inf-sci.net/III-8/65/2016/
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

A multi-site, multi-device and multi-criteria decision support tool designed to support the development of tidal current energy in the Philippines was developed. Its platform is based on Geographic Information Systems (GIS) which allows for the collection, storage, processing, analyses and display of geospatial data. Combining GIS tools with open source web development applications, it becomes a webGIS-based marine spatial planning tool. To date, the webGIS-based tool displays output maps and graphs of power and energy density, site suitability and site-device analysis. It enables stakeholders and the public easy access to the results of tidal current energy resource assessments and site suitability analyses. Results of the initial development showed that it is a promising decision support tool for ocean renewable energy project developments.

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