Community-based and Participatory Management

A tale of two communities: Using relational place-making to examine fisheries policy in the Pribilof Island communities of St. George and St. Paul, Alaska

Lyons C, Carothers C, Reedy K. A tale of two communities: Using relational place-making to examine fisheries policy in the Pribilof Island communities of St. George and St. Paul, Alaska. Maritime Studies [Internet]. 2016 ;15(1). Available from: http://maritimestudiesjournal.springeropen.com/articles/10.1186/s40152-016-0045-1
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

This paper describes how relational place-making, with its focus on power dynamics, networked politics, and non-market, locally-valued characteristics, provides a useful framework for managers to better design fishing community policies. Social data, while becoming more common in fisheries management analyses, are typically restricted to quantitative measures that often cannot adequately summarize dynamics within fishing communities. In contrast, detailed ethnographic research and the theoretical framework of relational place-making can provide a useful methodology through which to gather social data to understand resource-dependent communities and the effects of fisheries management policies in these places. Relational place-making describes the process through which physical spaces are transformed into socially meaningful places, and how these understandings are contested and negotiated among different groups of actors. These contested narratives of place, called place-frames, can interact with economic development efforts to help create (or fail to create) sustainable communities. To better understand the efficacy of a specific fisheries policy, the community development quota (CDQ) program, we conducted 6 months of ethnographic research in the rural, Native communities of St. George and St. Paul, Alaska. In both communities we found that local place-frames centered on local empowerment and control. In St. George, local place-frames conflicted with place-frames advanced by CDQ employees, and locals were unable to align place-making goals with local economic realities. In St. Paul, local residents and CDQ employees shared a place-frame, allowing them to accomplish numerous local development goals. However, differences in place-frames advanced by other political entities on the island often complicated development initiatives. This study supports previous research indicating that policies and development projects that increase local power and self-determination are most successful in furthering community sustainability and well-being. This study indicates that relational place-making can illuminate local goals and desires and is therefore of great utility to the fisheries management decision-making process.

Community-based mangrove forest management: Implications for local livelihoods and coastal resource conservation along the Volta estuary catchment area of Ghana

Aheto DWorlanyo, Kankam S, Okyere I, Mensah E, Osman A, Jonah FEkow, Mensah JCamillus. Community-based mangrove forest management: Implications for local livelihoods and coastal resource conservation along the Volta estuary catchment area of Ghana. Ocean & Coastal Management [Internet]. 2016 ;127:43 - 54. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0964569116300540
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Even though global interest in mangrove research has increased in recent years, unveiling their immense ecological and economic roles, very little work has been done to investigate the primary driving factors motivating long-term community-based mangrove restoration and management on local scales. In Ghana, policy makers and coastal management practitioners have recently embraced the concept of community-based and co-management of coastal and marine resources. Community-based and co-management approaches require that key stakeholders, most notably the resource users themselves, play significant roles and responsibilities in the management process. However, there is little evaluation of the process in Ghana to assess the success or otherwise, particularly of the few and long standing examples of community-based approaches in coastal resource management. With special reference to an over two decade old community-based mangrove forestry programme along the Volta estuary of Ghana, this paper provides concepts for examination of the ecological and socioeconomic factors influencing mangrove restoration and management by fishers, fish mongers, farmers and their socioeconomic groupings. Participatory GIS mapping and the use of orthophotos generated for the period 1974–2011 provided additional information on temporal evolution of the extent of mangrove areas restored and managed by local stakeholders. Socioeconomic assessment of mangrove products utility was done through questionnaire interviews. The results indicate that livelihoods and economic benefits are the primary factors that motivate local stakeholders' participation in mangrove restoration and management. Mangroves provisioning services, markets and low livelihoods diversification are major drivers of mangrove resources exploitation. The study has shown that mangroves resources can be sustainably exploited, restored and managed if local customary rules are enforced and institutional arrangements put in place to mediate mangrove exploitation and regeneration rates. Such an approach if well developed, could promote coastal resources conservation with high economic returns for the users.

Participation in devolved commons management: Multiscale socioeconomic factors related to individuals’ participation in community-based management of marine protected areas in Indonesia

Gurney GG, Cinner JE, Sartin J, Pressey RL, Ban NC, Marshall NA, Prabuning D. Participation in devolved commons management: Multiscale socioeconomic factors related to individuals’ participation in community-based management of marine protected areas in Indonesia. Environmental Science & Policy [Internet]. 2016 ;61:212 - 220. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1462901116300995
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Management of common-pool natural resources is commonly implemented under institutional models promoting devolved decision-making, such as co-management and community-based management. Although participation of local people is critical to the success of devolved commons management, few studies have empirically investigated how individuals’ participation is related to socioeconomic factors that operate at multiple scales. Here, we evaluated how individual- and community-scale factors were related to levels of individual participation in management of community-based marine protected areas in Indonesia. In addressing this aim, we drew on multiple bodies of literature on human behaviour from economics and social science, including the social-ecological systems framework from the literature on common-pool resources, the theory of planned behaviour from social psychology, and public goods games from behavioural economics. We found three key factors related to level of participation of local people: subjective norms, structural elements of social capital, and nested institutions. There was also suggestive evidence that participation was related to people’s cooperative behavioural disposition, which we elicited using a public goods game. These results point to the importance of considering socioeconomic factors that operate at multiple scales when examining individual behaviour. Further, our study highlights the need to consider multiscale mechanisms other than those designed to appeal to self-interested concerns, such as regulations and material incentives, which are typically employed in devolved commons management to encourage participation. Increased understanding of the factors related to participation could facilitate better targeting of investments aimed at encouraging cooperative management.

Restricted grouper reproductive migrations support community-based management

Waldie PA, Almany GR, Sinclair-Taylor TH, Hamilton RJ, Potuku T, Priest MA, Rhodes KL, Robinson J, Cinner JE, Berumen ML. Restricted grouper reproductive migrations support community-based management. Royal Society Open Science [Internet]. 2016 ;3(3):150694. Available from: http://rsos.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/3/3/150694.abstract
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Conservation commonly requires trade-offs between social and ecological goals. For tropical small-scale fisheries, spatial scales of socially appropriate management are generally small—the median no-take locally managed marine area (LMMA) area throughout the Pacific is less than 1 km2. This is of particular concern for large coral reef fishes, such as many species of grouper, which migrate to aggregations to spawn. Current data suggest that the catchment areas (i.e. total area from which individuals are drawn) of such aggregations are at spatial scales that preclude effective community-based management with no-take LMMAs. We used acoustic telemetry and tag-returns to examine reproductive migrations and catchment areas of the grouper Epinephelus fuscoguttatus at a spawning aggregation in Papua New Guinea. Protection of the resultant catchment area of approximately 16 km2 using a no-take LMMA is socially untenable here and throughout much of the Pacific region. However, we found that spawning migrations were skewed towards shorter distances. Consequently, expanding the current 0.2 km2 no-take LMMA to 1–2 km2 would protect approximately 30–50% of the spawning population throughout the non-spawning season. Contrasting with current knowledge, our results demonstrate that species with moderate reproductive migrations can be managed at scales congruous with spatially restricted management tools.

Learning from disaster: Community-based marine protected areas in Fiji

Anon. Learning from disaster: Community-based marine protected areas in Fiji. Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan: University of Tsukuba; 2013. Available from: http://www.econ.tsukuba.ac.jp/RePEc/2013-001.pdf
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Report

This paper empirically examines whether and how experiencing climate-related disasters can improve the rural poorfs adaptation to climate change through community-based resource management. Original household survey data in Fiji capture the unique sequence of a tropical cyclone and the establishment of community-based marine protected areas as a natural experiment. The analysis reveals that household disaster victimization increases its support for establishing marine protected areas for future safety nets. Under Fijian traditional consensual institutions, social learning from disaster experience among community members facilitates their collective decision-making for conservation to enhance community resilience to climate shocks.

Testing fisher-developed alternatives to fishery management tools for community support and regulatory effectiveness

Carr LM, Heyman WD. Testing fisher-developed alternatives to fishery management tools for community support and regulatory effectiveness. Marine Policy [Internet]. 2016 ;67:40 - 53. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X16000403
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

This research develops a methodology to evaluate public support for fishing regulations, comparing existing regulations designed without much public input, to possible alternative regulations based fishers' ecological knowledge (FEK) and preferences. First, a survey and open-ended interview was completed with 42 fishers in St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands (33% of the total number of currently registered commercial fishers on island) regarding general matters of fishery health and productivity, with heightened focus on the management of a mutton snapper (Lutjanus analis) spawning aggregation. The interview results suggest that fishers view management tools in terms of spatial and temporal parameters, and how much those regulations influence gear selection. Fishers respond primarily to socioeconomic pressures, but recognize and support ecological goals of regulations, particularly those that provide protections to important stocks throughout their spawning season. A Discrete Choice Model (DCM) was developed based on the results of the fisher surveys and was administered to 182 individuals, including 54 residents of St. Croix and all 42 fishers interviewed. Eight DCM options were presented to respondents who selected their regulatory preference in a pair-wise fashion. In seven of eight pairs, public respondents selected fisher-preferred, FEK-based regulatory frameworks. These results suggest FEK can be used to develop fishery regulations that will meet management goals, and be broadly supported by both members of the fishing community and the general public. In this manner, ecosystem-based management frameworks can be improved by incorporating fishers and their FEK, particularly for small-scale fisheries.

Conflict in Protected Areas: Who Says Co-Management Does Not Work?

De Pourcq K, Thomas E, Arts B, Vranckx A, Léon-Sicard T, Van Damme P. Conflict in Protected Areas: Who Says Co-Management Does Not Work?. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2015 ;10(12):e0144943. Available from: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0144943
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Natural resource-related conflicts can be extremely destructive and undermine environmental protection. Since the 1990s co-management schemes, whereby the management of resources is shared by public and/or private sector stakeholders, have been a main strategy for reducing these conflicts worldwide. Despite initial high hopes, in recent years co-management has been perceived as falling short of expectations. However, systematic assessments of its role in conflict prevention or mitigation are non-existent. Interviews with 584 residents from ten protected areas in Colombia revealed that co-management can be successful in reducing conflict at grassroots level, as long as some critical enabling conditions, such as effective participation in the co-management process, are fulfilled not only on paper but also by praxis. We hope these findings will re-incentivize global efforts to make co-management work in protected areas and other common pool resource contexts, such as fisheries, agriculture, forestry and water management.

The Local Early Action Planning (LEAP) Tool: Enhancing Community-Based Planning for a Changing Climate

Wongbusarakum S, Gombos M, Parker B-AA, Courtney CA, Atkinson S, Kostka W. The Local Early Action Planning (LEAP) Tool: Enhancing Community-Based Planning for a Changing Climate. Coastal Management [Internet]. 2015 ;43(4):383 - 393. Available from: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/08920753.2015.1046805
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Tropical coastal communities face the impacts of climate change with increasing frequency and severity, which exacerbates existing local threats to natural resources and the societies that depend on them. Climate change presents a unique opportunity to reconsider how community-based planning is used to (1) improve overall climate knowledge, both through communicating climate science and incorporating local knowledge; (2) give equal consideration to the social and ecological aspects of community health and resilience; and (3) integrate multisector planning to maximize community benefits and minimize unintended negative impacts. This article describes a tool developed to respond to these opportunities in Micronesia and the Coral Triangle region, Adapting to a Changing Climate: Guide to Local Early Action Planning (LEAP) and Management Planning. It discusses challenges and lessons learned based on the process of the tool development, training with local communities and stakeholders, and input from those who have implemented the tool.

Key issues and drivers affecting coastal and marine resource decisions: Participatory management strategy evaluation to support adaptive management

Dutra LXC, Thebaud O, Boschetti F, Smith ADM, Dichmont CM. Key issues and drivers affecting coastal and marine resource decisions: Participatory management strategy evaluation to support adaptive management. Ocean & Coastal Management [Internet]. 2015 ;116:382 - 395. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0964569115300107
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article
  • Improving resource information alone has limited effect on decision-making processes.
  • A formal participatory MSE allows for more transparency in the management process.
  • It supports strategy design, communication and shared understanding about management issues.
  • Participatory methods can help modify individual attitudes and group interactions.

Stakeholder-led knowledge production: Development of a long-term management plan for North Sea Nephrops fisheries

Stange K, van Tatenhove J, van Leeuwen J. Stakeholder-led knowledge production: Development of a long-term management plan for North Sea Nephrops fisheries. Science and Public Policy [Internet]. 2015 ;42(4):501 - 513. Available from: http://spp.oxfordjournals.org/content/42/4/501.abstract
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

This paper investigates how different kinds of knowledge are mobilised in interactions between the stakeholders, scientists and bureaucrats who are involved in EU fisheries management. It reports on an initiative led by the North Sea Regional Advisory Council aimed at making a long-term management plan for Nephrops fisheries in the North Sea. The sharing of knowledge between the actors is explored using insights from organisation management, focusing on the kinds of resources and efforts that are needed at different boundaries to allow knowledge sharing and knowledge production to occur. The findings point to the challenge of reaching a common understanding between actors when both novelty and high stakes are involved. Experiences gained during this pioneering initiative raise questions about how far it is possible to take a ‘bottom up’ collaborative process aimed at developing management instruments within a setting where there are conflicts of interests between the stakeholders involved.

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