Corals

Coral reefs and the slow emergence of institutional structures for a glocal land- and sea-based collective dilemma

Schlüter A, Vance C, FERSE SEBASTIAN. Coral reefs and the slow emergence of institutional structures for a glocal land- and sea-based collective dilemma. Marine Policy [Internet]. In Press :103505. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X18303579
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

Coral reefs are subject to multiple stressors. Global stressors include climate changeand ocean acidification, while local stressors include overfishing and eutrophication. Some stressors stem from land-based activities, like intensive agriculture or sewage production, while others are sea-based, like fishing or diving. Processes that aim to tackle coral degradation are transpiring on different levels. These include the UNDP's Sustainable Development Goal 14, and the Coral TriangleInitiative, which foresees the installation of marine protected areas and conservation planning. This paper uses Evolutionary Governance Theory (EGT) to understand the current processes of changes in governance influencing coral reef health. EGT sees the change of governance as an evolutionary process. It emphasises that discourses play a crucial role in understanding governance evolution. Power, in particular power-knowledge in the Foucaultian sense, plays a crucial role as a driving factor. Governance does not change in a vacuum, but according to EGT is shaped by path, inter- and goal dependencies. Of late, the role of materiality - ecological and technological conditions - has been stressed as an important driver of governance change. The paper considers the main threats to corals identified in the literature and analyses how those factors mentioned by EGT help us to understand the observed governance changes. The case of coral reefs was chosen as it represents an example of extremely diverse processes of institutional changes. Therefore, it is well suited to learn if EGT helps in understanding governance changes observed in the marine sector.

Rigorously valuing the role of U.S. coral reefs in coastal hazard risk reduction

Storlazzi CD, Reguero BG, Cole AD, Lowe E, Shope JB, Gibbs AE, Nickel BA, McCall RT, van Dongeren AR, Beck MW. Rigorously valuing the role of U.S. coral reefs in coastal hazard risk reduction. Reston, VA: U.S. Geological Survey; 2019. Available from: http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/ofr20191027
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Report

The degradation of coastal habitats, particularly coral reefs, raises risks by increasing the exposure of coastal communities to flooding hazards. The protective services of these natural defenses are not assessed in the same rigorous economic terms as artificial defenses, such as seawalls, and therefore often are not considered in decision making. Here we combine engineering, ecologic, geospatial, social, and economic tools to provide a rigorous valuation of the coastal protection benefits of all U.S. coral reefs in the States of Hawaiʻi and Florida, the territories of Guam, American Samoa, Puerto Rico, and Virgin Islands, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. We follow risk-based valuation approaches to map flood zones at 10-square-meter resolution along all 3,100+ kilometers of U.S. reef-lined shorelines for different storm probabilities to account for the effect of coral reefs in reducing coastal flooding. We quantify the coastal flood risk reduction benefits provided by coral reefs across storm return intervals using the latest information from the U.S. Census Bureau, Federal Emergency Management Agency, and Bureau of Economic Analysis to identify their annual expected benefits, a measure of the annual protection provided by coral reefs. Based on these results, the annual protection provided by U.S. coral reefs is estimated in:

  • avoided flooding to more than 18,180 people;
  • avoided direct flood damages of more than $825 million to more than 5,694 buildings;
  • avoided flooding to more than 33 critical infrastructure facilities, including essential facilities, utility systems, and transportation systems; and
  • avoided indirect damages of more than $699 million in economic activity of individuals and more than $272 million in avoided business interruption annually.

Thus, the annual value of flood risk reduction provided by U.S. coral reefs is more than 18,000 lives and $1.805 billion in 2010 U.S. dollars. These data provide stakeholders and decision makers with spatially explicit, rigorous valuation of how, where, and when U.S. coral reefs provide critical coastal storm flood reduction benefits. The overall goal is to ultimately reduce the risk to, and increase the resiliency of, U.S. coastal communities.

Marine heatwaves reveal coral reef zones susceptible to bleaching in the Red Sea

Genevier LGC, Jamil T, Raitsos DE, Krokos G, Hoteit I. Marine heatwaves reveal coral reef zones susceptible to bleaching in the Red Sea. Global Change Biology [Internet]. 2019 . Available from: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/gcb.14652
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $42.00
Type: Journal Article

As the Earth's temperature continues to rise, coral bleaching events become more frequent. Some of the most affected reef ecosystems are located in poorly‐monitored waters, and thus, the extent of the damage is unknown. We propose the use of Marine Heatwaves (MHWs) as a new approach for detecting coral reef zones susceptible to bleaching, using the Red Sea as a model system. Red Sea corals are exceptionally heat‐resistant, yet bleaching events have increased in frequency. By applying a strict definition of MHWs on >30‐year satellite‐derived sea surface temperature observations (1985–2015), we provide an atlas of MHW hotspots over the Red Sea coral reef zones, which includes all MHWs that caused major coral bleaching. We found that: 1) if tuned to a specific set of conditions, MHWs identify all areas where coral bleaching has previously been reported; 2) those conditions extended farther and occurred more often than bleaching was reported; and 3) an emergent pattern of extreme warming events is evident in the northern Red Sea (since 1998), a region until now thought to be a thermal refuge for corals. We argue that bleaching in the Red Sea may be vastly underrepresented. Additionally, although northern Red Sea corals exhibit remarkably high thermal resistance, the rapidly rising incidence of MHWs of high intensity indicates this region may not remain a thermal refuge much longer. As our regionally‐tuned MHW algorithm was capable of isolating all extreme warming events that have led to documented coral bleaching in the Red Sea, we propose that this approach could be used to reveal bleaching‐prone regions in other data‐limited tropical regions. It may thus prove a highly valuable tool for policy‐makers to optimise the sustainable management of coastal economic zones.

Contrasting responses of the coral Acropora tenuis to moderate and strong light limitation in coastal waters

Strahl J, Rocker MM, Fabricius KE. Contrasting responses of the coral Acropora tenuis to moderate and strong light limitation in coastal waters. Marine Environmental Research [Internet]. In Press . Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0141113619300601
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Coastal water quality and light attenuation can detrimentally affect coral health. This study investigated the effects of light limitation and reduced water quality on the physiological performance of the coral Acropora tenuis. Branches of individual colonies were collected in 2 m water depth at six inshore reefs at increasing distances from major river sources in the Great Barrier Reef, along a strong water quality gradient in the Burdekin and a weak gradient in the Whitsunday region. Rates of net photosynthesis, dark respiration, and light and dark calcification were determined at daily light integrals (DLI) of moderate (13.86–16.38 mol photons m−2d−1), low (7.92–9.36 mol photons m−2 d−1) and no light (0 mol photons m−2 d−1), in both the dry season (October 2013, June 2014) and the wet season (February 2014). Along the strong but not the weak water quality gradient, rates of net photosynthesis, dark respiration and light calcification increased towards the river mouth both in the dry and the wet seasons. Additionally, a ∼50% light reduction (from moderate to low light), as often found in shallow turbid waters in the Burdekin region, reduced rates of net photosynthesis and light calcification by up to 70% and 50%. The data show the acclimation potential in A. tenuis to river derived nutrients and sediments at moderate DLI (i.e., in very shallow water). However, prolonged and frequent periods of low DLI (i.e., in deeper water, especially after high river sediment discharges) will affect the corals’ energy balance, and may represent a major factor limiting the depth distribution of these corals in turbid coastal reefs.

Insights from a decade of research on coral reef – atmosphere energetics

McGowan H, Sturman A, Saunders M, Theobald A, Wiebe A. Insights from a decade of research on coral reef – atmosphere energetics. Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres [Internet]. 2019 . Available from: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1029/2018JD029830
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $42.00
Type: Journal Article

Coral reefs cover approximately 0.10 to 0.25% of the marine environment, and yet are home to around 25% of marine species and support the livelihoods of more 500 million people. They face a wide range of threats, with the impact of global warming gaining most attention due to its frequently claimed causal link to coral bleaching. Here we review a decade of research into the micrometeorology of Heron Reef, a lagoonal platform coral reef in the southern Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Using novel pontoon mounted eddy covariance systems we show that often > 80% of net radiation is partitioned into heating the water overlying the reef, the reef benthos, and substrate. Significant spatial variability in energy and trace gas exchanges occurs over the reef in response to different geomorphic and hydrodynamic conditions. Synoptic weather patterns that bring light winds, clear skies and high humidity, result in reef scale meteorology that appears to have a greater influence on coral bleaching events than the background oceanic warming trend. The reef develops its own convective internal boundary layer, with potential to influence cloud development and therefore the surface energy balance. Knowledge of such local effects is lacking, so it is recommended that future research is needed into reef scale processes and how they interact with larger scale forcing.

Antibiotics in corals of the South China Sea: Occurrence, distribution, bioaccumulation, and considerable role of coral mucus

Zhang R, Yu K, Li A, Wang Y, Huang X. Antibiotics in corals of the South China Sea: Occurrence, distribution, bioaccumulation, and considerable role of coral mucus. Environmental Pollution [Internet]. In Press . Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0269749118354113
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

Manmade antibiotics are emerging organic pollutants widely detected in the marine environment. In this study, 14 out of 19 target antibiotics were detected in corals collected from coastal and offshore regions in the South China Sea. The average total antibiotic concentrations (∑19ABs) in the two regions were similar: 28 ng/g for coastal corals and 31 ng/g for offshore corals, based on dry tissue weight (dw). Fluoroquinolones (FQs) were predominant antibiotics in the coastal corals (mean ∑FQs: 18 ng/g dw), while sulfonamides (SAs) predominated in the offshore corals (mean ∑SAs: 23 ng/g dw). However, corals living in coastal regions tend to excrete more mucus than corals in offshore habitat. We found 53% by average of ∑19ABs in the mucus of the coastal corals; while in offshore corals, most antibiotics (88% by average) were accumulated in the tissues. In addition, the tissue-mucus mass distribution differs among individual antibiotics. Sulfonamides were mainly accumulated in tissues while fluoroquinolones were present mainly in mucus. The results of this study suggest that mucus played an important role in the bioaccumulation of antibiotics by corals. It may resist the bioaccumulation of antibiotics by coral tissue, especially for the coastal corals. Additionally, corals were compared with other marine biotas in the study area and found to be more bioaccumulative towards antibiotics.

Status and recent trends in coral reefs of the Philippines

Licuanan WY, Robles R, Reyes M. Status and recent trends in coral reefs of the Philippines. Marine Pollution Bulletin [Internet]. 2019 ;142:544 - 550. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025326X19302747
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Concern about the condition of Philippine coral reefs has prompted a recent reassessment of the status of the nation's reefs, the results of which are reported here. This paper presents the largest updated dataset on Philippine coral cover and generic diversity. The dataset was obtained from equally-sized sampling stations on fore-reef slopes of fringing reefs in six biogeographic regions using identical methods. A total of 206 stations were surveyed from 2014 to 2017, and another 101 stations were monitored from 2015 to 2018.

The weighted average hard coral cover (HCC) was 22.8% (±1.2 SE) and coral generic diversity averaged 14.5 (±0.5 SE). Both were highest in the fully-formed reefs of the Sulu Sea biogeographic region and lowest in the eastern Philippines. Comparisons of findings with those of previous assessments show the continued decline in coral cover over a larger time scale, with the loss of about a third of the reef corals over the last decade. However, no consistent changes were evident in the 101 monitoring stations from 2015 to 2018 despite the global coral bleaching event. An expanded monitoring program, not just one-off assessments, is recommended to improve reef management in the Philippines.

Scaling Up Coral Reef Restoration Using Remote Sensing Technology

Foo SA, Asner GP. Scaling Up Coral Reef Restoration Using Remote Sensing Technology. Frontiers in Marine Science [Internet]. 2019 ;6. Available from: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2019.00079/full
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Coral reefs face an uncertain future and may not recover naturally from anthropogenic climate change. Coral restoration is needed to rehabilitate degraded reefs and to sustain biodiversity. There is a need for baseline data on global reef distribution, composition, and condition to provide targets for conservation and restoration. Remote sensing can address this issue and is currently underutilized in reef research and restoration. This synthesis integrates current capabilities of remote sensing with key reef restoration criteria, to facilitate coral restoration success. Research into the development of a spectral database for corals, linking habitat type and extent with predator abundance, and identification of species-specific acoustic signatures are needed to advance the use of remote sensing in reef restoration design and monitoring. Reciprocally, reef restoration efforts should innovate at ecosystem, regional, and global levels using remote sensing, to preserve as much of the coral reef biome as possible with continued ocean-climate change.

The Fate of Cold-Water Corals in a Changing World: A Geological Perspective

Hebbeln D, Portilho-Ramos Rda Costa, Wienberg C, Titschack J. The Fate of Cold-Water Corals in a Changing World: A Geological Perspective. Frontiers in Marine Science [Internet]. 2019 ;6. Available from: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2019.00119/full
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

As “ecosystem engineers,” framework-forming scleractinian cold-water corals (CWC) build reefs that are unique biodiversity hotspots in the deep sea. Studies using common biological techniques such as correlating the spatial occurrence of the most common CWC species with modeled environmental conditions have revealed the ecological requirements and tolerances of these species. However, limited field observations and poorly understood geographical distribution patterns of the CWC restrict the application of existing knowledge toward assessing their fate (e.g., local extinction, newly established populations) under ongoing global change. Hence, the risk to cross ecological tipping points causing the demise (or establishment) of entire CWC reefs remains unclear. A major challenge is to identify the key environmental parameters (or stressors) having the potential to control CWC vitality by providing such tipping points. This is largely hampered by the overall lack of present-day observations of such tipping point crossings. However, evidence for such events is frequently preserved in geological records revealing that entire CWC ecosystems vanished or returned at specific moments in the past. Here, a geological approach is presented that by correlating geological CWC records with paleoceanographic data describing past environmental changes allows to identify a set of key environmental drivers that directly or indirectly control CWC vitality. Thus, by combining such a geological approach with common biological techniques (see above) to describe the ecological tolerance of the most important reef-building CWC has a great potential to better assess their future spatial distribution in times of accelerating global change and to improve the sustainable management of the important deep-sea ecosystems formed by CWC.

Montastraea cavernosa corallite structure demonstrates distinct morphotypes across shallow and mesophotic depth zones in the Gulf of Mexico

Studivan MS, Milstein G, Voss JD. Montastraea cavernosa corallite structure demonstrates distinct morphotypes across shallow and mesophotic depth zones in the Gulf of Mexico Chen CAllen. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2019 ;14(3):e0203732. Available from: https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0203732
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

This study assessed morphological variation of the depth-generalist coral Montastraea cavernosa across shallow and mesophotic coral ecosystems in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) using thirteen corallite metrics. While corallite structure differed significantly across sites, we observed that mean corallite diameters were smaller and spacing was greater in mesophotic corals as compared to shallow corals. Additional corallite variation, including greater mean corallite height of mesophotic samples, are hypothesized to be photoadaptive responses to low light environments. Multivariate analyses also revealed two distinct morphotypes identified by significant variation in corallite spacing with >90% accuracy. A ‘shallow’ morphotype was characterized by larger, more closely-spaced corallites, while a ‘depth-generalist’ type exhibited smaller, further-spaced corallites. Variable presence of morphotypes within some sites suggests genotypic influence on corallite morphology as there was a slight, but significant, impact of morphotype on genetic structure within shallow zones in the Flower Garden Banks. Patterns of increased algal symbiont (Symbiodiniaceae) density and chlorophyll concentration were retained in the depth-generalist morphotype even in shallow zones, identifying multiple photoadaptive strategies between morphotypes. The results of this study suggest that morphological variation among Mcavernosa represents a combination of genotypic variation and phenotypic plasticity rather than responses to environmental stimuli alone.

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