Distributions of Species

Ocean currents, individual movements and genetic structuring of populations

Cardona L, Hays GC. Ocean currents, individual movements and genetic structuring of populations. Marine Biology [Internet]. 2018 ;165(1). Available from: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00227-017-3262-2
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Ocean currents profoundly impact all life in the oceans and over a broad size spectra species may show both horizontal and vertical movements to stay on preferred locations. As a corollary it might be expected that individuals in preferred oceanic habitats may simply drift with flows. We explored these scenarios by both satellite tracking young pelagic loggerhead turtles and examining the genetic structuring of individuals on coastal foraging areas across the Mediterranean in relation to ocean flows measured both with Lagrangian drifters and a numerical ocean circulation model for the area. Both patterns of movement (n = 18 turtles ranging in size from 41.2 to 68.5 cm CCL tracked for up to 460 days) and genetic structuring (n = 165 individuals from six sites across the ocean basin) suggested that ocean flows profoundly impact the movements of immature turtles and suggest a pattern of largely passive drift within an ocean basin that, throughout, is broadly favourable for developing loggerhead turtles. The situation contrasts with more heterogeneous habitats in the Atlantic and Pacific, where larger amounts of directional swimming may be required to avoid sub-optimum areas.

Satellite driven distribution models of endangered Atlantic sturgeon occurrence in the mid-Atlantic Bight

Breece MW, Fox DA, Haulsee DE, Wirgin II, Oliver MJ. Satellite driven distribution models of endangered Atlantic sturgeon occurrence in the mid-Atlantic Bight. ICES Journal of Marine Science [Internet]. 2017 . Available from: https://academic.oup.com/icesjms/article-abstract/doi/10.1093/icesjms/fsx187/4222666
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $42.00
Type: Journal Article

Atlantic sturgeon (Acipenser oxyrinchus oxyrinchus) is an endangered species that migrate through, and occupy the coastal waters of the mid-Atlantic Bight where they interact with anthropogenic activities. Measures to understand and avoid Atlantic sturgeon that take into consideration the dynamic nature of their habitat may reduce harmful interactions. In this study, we matched fisheries independent biotelemetry observations of Atlantic sturgeon with daily satellite observations to construct a time resolved spatial distribution model of Atlantic sturgeon. We determined that depth, day-of-year, sea surface temperature, and light absorption by seawater were the most important predictors of Atlantic sturgeon occurrence. Demographic factors, such as sex and river-of-origin were of secondary importance. We found strong spatial differences in spring and fall migration patterns, when anthropogenic interactions peak. Our cross-validated models correctly identified > 88% of biotelemetry observations in our study region. Our models also correctly identified ∼64% of bycatch observations throughout the year. However, during their migrations, when harmful interactions were highest, our models correctly identified ∼90% of fisheries dependent observations. We suggest that this model can be used for guidance to managers and stakeholders to reduce interactions with this highly imperiled species, thereby enhancing conservation and recovery efforts.

Pan-Antarctic analysis aggregating spatial estimates of Adélie penguin abundance reveals robust dynamics despite stochastic noise

Che-Castaldo C, Jenouvrier S, Youngflesh C, Shoemaker KT, Humphries G, McDowall P, Landrum L, Holland MM, Li Y, Ji R, et al. Pan-Antarctic analysis aggregating spatial estimates of Adélie penguin abundance reveals robust dynamics despite stochastic noise. Nature Communications [Internet]. 2017 ;8(1). Available from: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-017-00890-0
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Colonially-breeding seabirds have long served as indicator species for the health of the oceans on which they depend. Abundance and breeding data are repeatedly collected at fixed study sites in the hopes that changes in abundance and productivity may be useful for adaptive management of marine resources, but their suitability for this purpose is often unknown. To address this, we fit a Bayesian population dynamics model that includes process and observation error to all known Adélie penguin abundance data (1982–2015) in the Antarctic, covering >95% of their population globally. We find that process error exceeds observation error in this system, and that continent-wide “year effects” strongly influence population growth rates. Our findings have important implications for the use of Adélie penguins in Southern Ocean feedback management, and suggest that aggregating abundance across space provides the fastest reliable signal of true population change for species whose dynamics are driven by stochastic processes.

Satellite tagging of rehabilitated green sea turtles Chelonia mydas from the United Arab Emirates, including the longest tracked journey for the species

Robinson DP, Jabado RW, Rohner CA, Pierce SJ, Hyland KP, Baverstock WR. Satellite tagging of rehabilitated green sea turtles Chelonia mydas from the United Arab Emirates, including the longest tracked journey for the species Hays G. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2017 ;12(9):e0184286. Available from: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0184286
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

We collected movement data for eight rehabilitated and satellite-tagged green sea turtles Chelonia mydas released off the United Arab Emirates between 2005 and 2013. Rehabilitation periods ranged from 96 to 1353 days (mean = 437 ± 399 days). Seven of the eight tagged turtles survived after release; one turtle was killed by what is thought to be a post-release spear gun wound. The majority of turtles (63%) used shallow-water core habitats and established home ranges between Dubai and Abu Dhabi, the same area in which they had originally washed ashore prior to rescue. Four turtles made movements across international boundaries, highlighting that regional cooperation is necessary for the management of the species. One turtle swam from Fujairah to the Andaman Sea, a total distance of 8283 km, which is the longest published track of a green turtle. This study demonstrates that sea turtles can be successfully reintroduced into the wild after sustaining serious injury and undergoing prolonged periods of intense rehabilitation.

A second site occupied by Octopus tetricus at high densities, with notes on their ecology and behavior

Scheel D, Chancellor S, Hing M, Lawrence M, Linquist S, Godfrey-Smith P. A second site occupied by Octopus tetricus at high densities, with notes on their ecology and behavior. Marine and Freshwater Behaviour and Physiology [Internet]. 2017 :1 - 7. Available from: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10236244.2017.1369851
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $50.00
Type: Journal Article

We report wild octopuses (Octopus tetricus) living at high density at a rock outcrop, the second such site known. O. tetricus are often observed as solitary individuals, with the species known to exist at similar densities and exhibiting complex social behaviors at only one site other than that described here. The present site was occupied by 10–15 octopuses on eight different days. We recorded frequent interactions, signaling, mating, mate defense, eviction of octopuses from dens, and attempts to exclude individuals from the site. These observations demonstrate that high-density occupation and complex social behaviors are not unique to the earlier described site, which had been affected to some extent by remains of human activity. Behavior at this second site confirms that complex social interactions also occur in association with natural substrate, and suggest that social interactions are more wide spread among octopuses than previously recognized.

Movement, distribution and marine reserve use by an endangered migratory giant

Reynolds SD, Norman BM, Beger M, Franklin CE, Dwyer RG. Movement, distribution and marine reserve use by an endangered migratory giant Hawkes L. Diversity and Distributions [Internet]. 2017 . Available from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ddi.12618/abstract
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Aim

Understanding the spatial and temporal variation in the distribution of migratory species is critical for management and conservation efforts. However, challenges in observing mobile marine species throughout their migratory pathways can impede the identification of critical habitat, linkages between these habitats and threat-mitigation strategies. This study aimed to gain insight into the long-term residency and movement patterns of the whale shark (Rhincodon typus) and to reveal important habitat in the context of R. typus usage of existing Marine Protected Areas (MPAs).

Location

South-eastern Indian Ocean.

Methods

Satellite telemetry was used to remotely track the long-term movements of 29 R. typus, and to quantify shark usage of the existing MPA network. From the tracking data and environmental predictors, nonlinear models were developed to predict suitable R. typus habitat throughout the south-eastern Indian Ocean.

Results

This study includes the first documented complete return migrations by R. typus to Ningaloo Marine Park, which was found to be an important area for R. typus all year-round. We found that while existing MPAs along Australia's west coast do afford some protection to R. typus, telemetry-based habitat models revealed large areas of suitable habitat not currently protected, particularly along the Western Australian coast, in the Timor Sea, and in Indonesian and international waters.

Main conclusions

Animal-borne telemetric devices allowed the gathering of long-term spatial information from the elusive and highly mobile R. typus, revealing the spatial scale of their migration in the south-eastern Indian Ocean. Suitable habitat was predicted to occur inside conservation areas, but our findings indicate that the current MPA network may not sufficiently protect R. typus throughout the year. We suggest that telemetry-based habitat models can be an important tool to inform conservation planning and spatial management efforts for migratory species.

Spatial distributions of Southern Ocean mesozooplankton communities have been resilient to long-term surface warming

Tarling GA, Ward P, Thorpe SE. Spatial distributions of Southern Ocean mesozooplankton communities have been resilient to long-term surface warming. Global Change Biology [Internet]. 2017 . Available from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/gcb.13834/abstract
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $38.00
Type: Journal Article

The biogeographic response of oceanic planktonic communities to climatic change has a large influence on the future stability of marine food webs and the functioning of global biogeochemical cycles. Temperature plays a pivotal role in determining the distribution of these communities and ocean warming has the potential to cause major distributional shifts, particularly in polar regions where the thermal envelope is narrow. We considered the impact of long-term ocean warming on the spatial distribution of Southern Ocean mesozooplankton communities through examining plankton abundance in relation to sea surface temperature between two distinct periods, separated by around 60 years. Analyses considered 16 dominant mesozooplankton taxa (in terms of biomass and abundance) in the southwest Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean, from net samples and in situ temperature records collected during the Discovery Investigations (1926–1938) and contemporary campaigns (1996–2013). Sea surface temperature was found to have increased significantly by 0.74°C between the two eras. The corresponding sea surface temperature at which community abundance peaked was also significantly higher in contemporary times, by 0.98°C. Spatial projections indicated that the geographical location of community peak abundance had remained the same between the two eras despite the poleward advance of sea surface isotherms. If the community had remained within the same thermal envelope as in the 1920s–1930s, community peak abundance would be 500 km further south in the contemporary era. Studies in the northern hemisphere have found that dominant taxa, such as calanoid copepods, have conserved their thermal niches and tracked surface isotherms polewards. The fact that this has not occurred in the Southern Ocean suggests that other selective pressures, particularly food availability and the properties of underlying water masses, place greater constraints on spatial distributions in this region. It further demonstrates that this community is thermally resilient to present levels of sea surface warming.

Continental-scale hotspots of pelagic fish abundance inferred from commercial catch records

Bouchet PJ, Meeuwig JJ, Huang Z, Letessier TB, Nichol SL, M. Caley J, Watson RA. Continental-scale hotspots of pelagic fish abundance inferred from commercial catch records. Global Ecology and Biogeography [Internet]. 2017 . Available from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/geb.12619/abstract
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $38.00
Type: Journal Article

Aim

Protected areas have become pivotal to the modern conservation planning toolbox, but a limited understanding of marine macroecology is hampering their efficient design and implementation in pelagic environments. We explored the respective contributions of environmental factors and human impacts in capturing the distribution of an assemblage of commercially valuable, large-bodied, open-water predators (tunas, marlins and mackerels).

Location

Western Australia.

Time period

1997–2006.

Major taxa studied

Pelagic fishes.

Methods

We compiled 10 years of commercial fishing records from the Sea Around Us Projectand derived relative abundance indices from standardized catch rates while accounting for confounding effects of effort, year and gear type. We used these indices to map pelagic hotspots over a 0.5°-resolution grid and built random forests to estimate the importance of 33 geophysical, oceanographic and anthropogenic predictors in explaining their locations. We additionally examined the spatial congruence between these hotspots and an extensive network of marine reserves and determined whether patterns of co-occurrence deviated from random expectations using null model simulations.

Results

First, we identified several pelagic hotspots off the coast of Western Australia. Second, geomorphometrics explained up to 50% of the variance in relative abundance of pelagic fishes, and submarine canyon presence ranked as the most influential variable in the North bioregion. Seafloor complexity, geodiversity, salinity, temperature variability, primary production, ocean energy, current regimes and human impacts were also identified as important predictors. Third, spatial overlap between hotspots and marine reserves was limited, with most high-abundance areas primarily found in zones where anthropogenic activities are subject to few regulations.

Main conclusions

This study reveals geomorphometrics as valuable indicators of the distribution of mobile fish species and highlights the relevance of harnessing static topography as a key element in any blueprint for ocean zoning and spatial management.

Quantifying marine mammal hotspots in British Columbia, Canada

Harvey GKA, Nelson TA, Fox CH, Paquet PC. Quantifying marine mammal hotspots in British Columbia, Canada. Ecosphere [Internet]. 2017 ;8(7):e01884. Available from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ecs2.1884/full
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Global biodiversity is undergoing rapid decline due to direct and indirect anthropogenic impacts to species and ecosystems. Marine species, in particular, are experiencing accelerated population declines leading to many species being considered at risk by regional, national, and international standards. As one conservation approach, decisions made using spatially explicit information on marine wildlife populations have the potential to facilitate recovery and contribute to national and international commitments toward conservation targets. Delineating areas of intense use by species at risk can inform future marine spatial planning and conservation efforts, including the identification of marine protected areas. Methods for detecting hotspots (e.g., areas with high density and/or abundance) enable categorical mapping of the most intensely used areas. Yet, many of the current methods for delineating hotspots, such as the top 5% threshold, are subjective and fail to account for spatial patterns. Our goal was to map spatially continuous distributions of marine mammal densities and employ quantitative statistical methods to extract hotspot locations on the northern coast of British Columbia. We integrated systematically surveyed species information with environmental variables using generalized additive models to predict marine mammal distribution and density. Hotspots were identified from the density surfaces using two approaches: aspatial top 5% method and spatially local Gi* statistic using three neighborhood definitions. Heterogeneous density patterns were observed for all species, and high-density regions were generally clustered in areas exhibiting oceanographic characteristics that may promote concentrated food resources. Combining species density surfaces and extracting hotspot locations identified regions important to multiple species and present candidate locations for future conservation efforts. Contributions from this research provide robust statistical methods to objectively map hotspot locations and generate GIS data products for informing coastal conservation decisions.

Restricted regions of enhanced growth of Antarctic krill in the circumpolar Southern Ocean

Murphy EJ, Thorpe SE, Tarling GA, Watkins JL, Fielding S, Underwood P. Restricted regions of enhanced growth of Antarctic krill in the circumpolar Southern Ocean. Scientific Reports [Internet]. 2017 ;7(1). Available from: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-07205-9
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Food webs in high-latitude oceans are dominated by relatively few species. Future ocean and sea-ice changes affecting the distribution of such species will impact the structure and functioning of whole ecosystems. Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) is a key species in Southern Ocean food webs, but there is little understanding of the factors influencing its success throughout much of the ocean. The capacity of a habitat to maintain growth will be crucial and here we use an empirical relationship of growth rate to assess seasonal spatial variability. Over much of the ocean, potential for growth is limited, with three restricted oceanic regions where seasonal conditions permit high growth rates, and only a few areas around the Scotia Sea and Antarctic Peninsula suitable for growth of the largest krill (>60 mm). Our study demonstrates that projections of impacts of future change need to account for spatial and seasonal variability of key ecological processes within ocean ecosystems.

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