Ecosystem Assessment

An integrated method to evaluate and monitor the conservation state of coralligenous habitats: The INDEX-COR approach

Sartoretto S, Schohn T, Bianchi CNike, Morri C, Garrabou J, Ballesteros E, Ruitton S, Verlaque M, Daniel B, Charbonnel E, et al. An integrated method to evaluate and monitor the conservation state of coralligenous habitats: The INDEX-COR approach. Marine Pollution Bulletin [Internet]. 2017 . Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025326X17304071
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

A new method based on photographic sampling coupled with in situ observations was applied to 53 stations along the French Mediterranean coast, to assess the integrity of coralligenous reefs affected by different levels of anthropogenic pressure. The conservation state of the assemblages characterizing these habitats was then assessed by an index – the INDEX-COR – that integrates three metrics: (i) the sensitivity of the taxa to organic matter and sediment deposition, (ii) the observable taxonomic richness, and (iii) the structural complexity of the assemblages. The sensitivity of INDEX-COR was tested and showed good correlation with the Level of Pressure calculated for each station according to expert judgment and field observations.

State of the Arctic Marine Biodiversity Report

Anon. State of the Arctic Marine Biodiversity Report. Akureyri, Iceland; 2017. Available from: https://caff.is/marine/marine-monitoring-publications/state-of-the-arctic-marine-biodiversity-report/431-state-of-the-arctic-marine-biodiversity-report-full-report
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Report

The State of the Arctic Marine Biodiversity Report (SAMBR) is a synthesis of the state of knowledge about biodiversity in Arctic marine ecosystems, detectable changes, and important gaps in our ability to assess state and trends in biodiversity across six focal ecosystem components (FECs): marine mammals, seabirds, marine fishes, benthos, plankton, and sea ice biota.

US-Mexico joint gulf of Mexico large marine ecosystem based assessment and management: Experience in community involvement and mangrove wetland restoration in Términos lagoon, Mexico

Zaldívar-Jiménez A, de PGuevara-Po, Pérez-Ceballos R, Díaz-Mondragón S, Rosado-Solórzano R. US-Mexico joint gulf of Mexico large marine ecosystem based assessment and management: Experience in community involvement and mangrove wetland restoration in Términos lagoon, Mexico. Environmental Development [Internet]. 2017 . Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2211464516302512
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $31.50
Type: Journal Article

The purpose of this article is to present the Mexican experience related to the US-Mexico joint Gulf of Mexico Large Marine Ecosystem-Based Assessment and Management Project, particularly the community involvement and mangrove wetland restoration, and the challenges for its replication and up-scaling. Results focus on community engagement, environmental education and social participation, strategies for hydrological restoration of mangrove, and difficulties and recommendations for the implementation of the Strategic Action Program. The main conclusions are that the community-based hydrologic restoration approach, is a good way to ensure long-term restoration of wetlands. Changing from mangrove plantations to the hydrological restoration of wetlands, and construction of human capacities resulted in a more efficient strategy for ecosystem restoration and had influenced the forest environmental policy. The involvement of government and education institutions as execution agencies will contribute to a more efficient appropriation of the project and LME approach. The development of economic alternatives and the ecological monitoring are some of the identified challenges within the implementation phase of the Strategic Action Program.

Changing coastlines in NE England: a legacy of colliery spoil tipping and the effects of its cessation

Cooper N, Benson N, McNeill A, Siddle R. Changing coastlines in NE England: a legacy of colliery spoil tipping and the effects of its cessation. Proceedings of the Yorkshire Geological Society [Internet]. 2017 . Available from: http://pygs.lyellcollection.org/content/early/2017/02/08/pygs2016-369?ct
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $30.00
Type: Journal Article

Historical tipping of vast quantities of colliery spoil at various foreshore locations in NE England has changed the morphology and sedimentology of large areas of the shoreline and nearshore sea bed, and has impacted adversely upon the ecology and amenity use of the area. Tipping started early in the 20th Century, well before statutory controls to regulate impacts of activities on the marine environment came into force in the UK in 1974, and ended with the closure of the last colliery in 2005. The spoil tipping acted as a form of artificial sediment recharge to the foreshore, akin to conventional beach recharge schemes that use sand or shingle to replenish foreshores for coastal defence and amenity purposes, but creating a legacy of contaminated beaches and prograding (advancing) shores. Since closure of the collieries, however, the foreshores have received no artificial supply of material, and the shoreline in all former tipping areas has since been in retreat due to natural erosion. This has caused problems where assets are present at the rear of the spoil beaches, requiring coastal defence structures for their protection. As well as collating and analysing historical maps, records, literature and data relating to colliery spoil tipping, the coastal changes that have occurred since its cessation have been assessed by reference to more recent maps, literature, aerial photographs and new and up-to-date beach profile transect survey data from contemporary coastal monitoring programmes. It is envisaged that where sea cliffs are protected by colliery spoil beaches, and hence currently are dormant, they could become re-activated by erosion and start to retreat at short term rates of several metres per year and longer-term rates of up to 0.3 m/year in the foreseeable future.

Habitat fragmentation has some impacts on aspects of ecosystem functioning in a sub-tropical seagrass bed

Sweatman JL, Layman CA, Fourqurean JW. Habitat fragmentation has some impacts on aspects of ecosystem functioning in a sub-tropical seagrass bed. Marine Environmental Research [Internet]. 2017 . Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S014111361730079X
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Habitat fragmentation impacts ecosystem functioning in many ways, including reducing the availability of suitable habitat for animals and altering resource dynamics. Fragmentation in seagrass ecosystems caused by propeller scarring is a major source of habitat loss, but little is known about how scars impact ecosystem functioning. Propeller scars were simulated in seagrass beds of Abaco, Bahamas, to explore potential impacts. To determine if plant-herbivore interactions were altered by fragmentation, amphipod grazers were excluded from half the experimental plots, and epiphyte biomass and community composition were compared between grazer control and exclusion plots. We found a shift from light limitation to phosphorus limitation at seagrass patch edges. Fragmentation did not impact top-down control on epiphyte biomass or community composition, despite reduced amphipod density in fragmented habitats. Seagrass and amphipod responses to propeller scarring suggest that severely scarred seagrass beds could be subject to changes in internal nutrient stores and amphipod distribution.

Spatiotemporal dynamics of submerged macrophyte status and watershed exploitation in a Mediterranean coastal lagoon: Understanding critical factors in ecosystem degradation and restoration

Pasqualini V, Derolez V, Garrido M, Orsoni V, Baldi Y, Etourneau S, Leoni V, Rébillout P, Laugier T, Souchu P, et al. Spatiotemporal dynamics of submerged macrophyte status and watershed exploitation in a Mediterranean coastal lagoon: Understanding critical factors in ecosystem degradation and restoration. Ecological Engineering [Internet]. 2017 ;102:1 - 14. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0925857417300368
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

Increases in the intensity of disturbances in coastal lagoons can lead to shifts in vegetation from aquatic angiosperms to macroalgal or phytoplankton communities. Such abrupt and discontinuous responses are facilitated by instability in the equilibrium controlling the trajectory of the community response. We hypothesized that the shift in macrophyte populations is reversible, and that this reversibility is dependent on changes in the pressures exerted on the watershed and lagoon functioning. Biguglia lagoon (Mediterranean Sea, Corsica) is an interesting case study for the evaluation of long-term coastal lagoon ecosystem functioning and the trajectory of submerged macrophyte responses to disturbances, to facilitate the appropriate restoration of ecosystems. We used historical data for a two hundred-year period to assess changes in human activities on the watershed of the Biguglia lagoon. Macrophyte mapping (from 1970) and monitoring data for dynamics (from 1999) were used to investigate the trajectory of the community response. The changes observed in this watershed included a large number of hydrological developments affecting salinity and resulting in changes in macrophyte distribution. Nutrient inputs over the last 40 years have led to a shift in the aquatic vegetation from predominantly aquatic angiosperm community to macroalgae and phytoplankton in 2007 (dystrophic crisis). Changes in hydrological management and improvements in sewage treatment after 2007 led to a significant increase of aquatic angiosperms over a relatively short period of time (4–5 years), particularly for Ruppia cirrhosa and Stuckenia pectinata. There has been a significant resurgence of Najas marina, due to changes in salinity. The observed community shift suggests that Biguglia lagoon is resilient and that the transition may be reversible. The restored communities closely resemble those present before disturbance. These findings demonstrate the need to understand watershed exploitation and ecosystem variability in lagoon restoration.

The Resilience of Marine Ecosystems to Climatic Disturbances

O'Leary JK, Micheli F, Airoldi L, Boch C, De Leo G, Elahi R, Ferretti F, Graham NAJ, Litvin SY, Low NH, et al. The Resilience of Marine Ecosystems to Climatic Disturbances. BioScience [Internet]. 2017 . Available from: https://academic.oup.com/bioscience/article/2900174/The
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The intensity and frequency of climate-driven disturbances are increasing in coastal marine ecosystems. Understanding the factors that enhance or inhibit ecosystem resilience to climatic disturbance is essential. We surveyed 97 experts in six major coastal biogenic ecosystem types to identify “bright spots” of resilience in the face of climate change. We also evaluated literature that was recommended by the experts that addresses the responses of habitat-forming species to climatic disturbance. Resilience was commonly reported in the expert surveys (80% of experts). Resilience was observed in all ecosystem types and at multiple locations worldwide. The experts and literature cited remaining biogenic habitat, recruitment/connectivity, physical setting, and management of local-scale stressors as most important for resilience. These findings suggest that coastal ecosystems may still hold great potential to persist in the face of climate change and that local- to regional-scale management can help buffer global climatic impacts.

Assessment and management of cumulative impacts in California's network of marine protected areas

Mach ME, Wedding LM, Reiter SM, Micheli F, Fujita RM, Martone RG. Assessment and management of cumulative impacts in California's network of marine protected areas. Ocean & Coastal Management [Internet]. 2017 ;137:1 - 11. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0964569116303647
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

In response to concerns about human impacts to coastal ecosystems, conservationists and practitioners are increasingly turning to networks of marine protected areas (MPAs). Although MPAs manage for fishing pressure, many species and habitats in MPAs remain exposed to a multitude of stressors, including stressors from global climate change and regional land- and ocean-based activities. To support the adaptive management of MPAs that are subject to multiple interacting stressors, coastal managers need to understand the potential impacts from other single and multiple stressors. To demonstrate how this can be done, we quantify and map cumulative impacts resulting from multiple stressors to California's network of MPAs, using a widely available cumulative impacts mapping tool. Among individual stressors, those related to climate, including ocean acidification, UV radiation increases, and SST anomalies, were found to have the most intense impacts, especially on surface waters and in the rocky intertidal. Climate stressors are challenging to limit at the local MPA scale, but intense land- and ocean-based impacts that were found to affect a majority of MPAs, such as sediment increases, invasive species, organic pollutants and pollution from shipping and ports, may be more easily regulated at a regional or local scale. This is especially relevant for South and Central coast MPAs where these impacts are the greatest on beaches, tidal flats, and coastal marshes. Accounting for cumulative impacts from these and other stressors when developing monitoring and management plans in California and across the world, would help to improve the efficacy of MPAs.

Using Conceptual Models and Qualitative Network Models to Advance Integrative Assessments of Marine Ecosystems

Harvey CJ, Reum JCP, Poe MR, Williams GD, Kim SJ. Using Conceptual Models and Qualitative Network Models to Advance Integrative Assessments of Marine Ecosystems. Coastal Management [Internet]. 2016 ;44(5):486 - 503. Available from: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/08920753.2016.1208881
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The complexity of ecosystem-based management (EBM) of natural resources has given rise to research frameworks such as integrated ecosystem assessments (IEA) that pull together large amounts of diverse information from physical, ecological, and social domains. Conceptual models are valuable tools for assimilating and simplifying this information to convey our understanding of ecosystem structure and functioning. Qualitative network models (QNMs) may allow us to conduct dynamic simulations of conceptual models to explore natural–social relationships, compare management strategies, and identify tradeoffs. We used previously developed QNM methods to perform simulations based on conceptual models of the California Current ecosystem's pelagic communities and related human activities and values. Assumptions about community structure and trophic interactions influenced the outcomes of the QNMs. In simulations where we applied unfavorable environmental conditions for production of salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.), intensive management actions only modestly mitigated declines experienced by salmon, but strongly constrained human activities. Moreover, the management actions had little effect on a human wellbeing attribute, sense of place. Sense of place was most strongly affected by a relatively small subset of all possible pair-wise interactions, although the relative influence of individual pair-wise interactions on sense of place grew more uniform as management actions were added, making it more difficult to trace effective management actions via specific mechanistic pathways. Future work will explore the importance of changing conceptual models and QNMs to represent management questions at finer spatial and temporal scales, and also examine finer representation of key ecological and social components.

Assessement and management of environmental quality conditions in marine sandy beaches for its sustainable use—Virtues of the population based approach

Gonçalves SC, Marques JC. Assessement and management of environmental quality conditions in marine sandy beaches for its sustainable use—Virtues of the population based approach. Ecological Indicators [Internet]. 2017 ;74:140 - 146. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1470160X16306616
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Sandy beaches constitute high natural value ecosystems which have been worldwide a target for growing human activities and ensuing pressures in the last decades, which caused ecological damages on these environments and led to its environmental quality decline. However, little is known about the responses of these ecosystems to distinct stressors and pressures, and holistic and integrated coastal management actions that protect beach environments and their ecological processes are yet to be developed. The aim of this viewpoint article is to present and discuss the utility of using a population approach to macrofaunal key species as a helpful tool for the assessment, management, and sustainable use of sandy beaches. The role of macrofaunal key species as indicators of environmental changes and of ecological quality condition is discussed and illustrated by some practical examples from the literature. The population is presented as a highly relevant ecological unit in management and one of the easiest ones to use, responding more rapidly to disturbances in the ecosystem than the most complex units. In this context, bio-ecology and population dynamics models are presented as tools and their potential, to improve the way we assess and manage ecological quality conditions of beach ecosystems aiming at its sustainable use, are discussed. Also, the advantages and drawbacks of the use of these tools in the population approach are evaluated. Monitoring, assessment and management practices focusing on beach key species bio-ecology as ecological indicator hold large potential in nowadays fast changing scenario, and should be encouraged as a function of their identifiable responses to manmade and natural disturbances.

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