Ecosystem-based Management (EBM)

An Ecosystem-Based Approach to Evaluating Impacts and Management of Invasive Lionfish

Chagaris D, Binion-Rock S, Bogdanoff A, Dahl K, Granneman J, Harris H, Mohan J, Rudd MB, Swenarton MKate, Ahrens R, et al. An Ecosystem-Based Approach to Evaluating Impacts and Management of Invasive Lionfish. Fisheries [Internet]. 2017 ;42(8):421 - 431. Available from: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/03632415.2017.1340273
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $30.00
Type: Journal Article

Species invasions in marine ecosystems pose a threat to native fish communities and can disrupt the food webs that support valuable commercial and recreational fisheries. In the Gulf of Mexico, densities of invasive Indo-Pacific Lionfish, Pterois volitans and P. miles, are among the highest in their invaded range. In a workshop setting held over a 2-week period, we adapted an existing trophic dynamic model of the West Florida Shelf, located in the eastern Gulf of Mexico, to simulate the lionfish (both species) invasion and community effects over a range of harvest scenarios for both lionfish and native predators. Our results suggest small increases in lionfish harvest can reduce peak biomass by up to 25% and also that reduced harvest of native reef fish predators can lead to lower lionfish densities. This model can help managers identify target harvest and benefits of a lionfish fishery and inform the assessment and management of valuable reef fish fisheries.

Confronting challenges to integrating Pacific salmon into ecosystem-based management policies

Malick MJ, Rutherford MB, Cox SP. Confronting challenges to integrating Pacific salmon into ecosystem-based management policies. Marine Policy [Internet]. 2017 ;85:123 - 132. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X17301902
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

Ecosystem-based management is an increasingly prominent paradigm for the management of living marine resources with a focus on maintaining ecosystem level properties and processes. Although highly migratory marine and anadromous fish species often disproportionately contribute to the structure and function of ecosystems, incorporating these species into ecosystem-based management policies remains difficult because they spend a considerable portion of time outside the boundaries that define a particular management area. In this paper, two case studies are used to examine how the challenges of ecosystem openness, imperfect information, and ecosystem complexity can impede efforts to integrate highly migratory Pacific salmon into ecosystem-based management policies. This analysis highlights three main factors that hinder more effective integration: (1) uncertainties about impacts of human activities and ecological processes that occur in geographically distant jurisdictional areas or at spatial scales larger than the ecosystem-based management area, (2) spatial asymmetries in the distribution of costs and benefits associated with management decisions (i.e., positive or negative externalities), and (3) static management policies that prevent updating management decisions in a timely manner when ecosystem conditions change or new information becomes available. Given these factors, two potential strategies to address migratory challenges are suggested. First, the creation of an international ecosystem synthesis group is recommended to facilitate the collection, analysis, and dissemination of ecological, social, and policy information across national and other jurisdictional boundaries. Second, the expanded use of dynamic in-season management policies is recommended, which allow for rapid updating of management decisions based on evolving information about ecosystem conditions.

Comparing Apples to Oranges: Common Trends and Thresholds in Anthropogenic and Environmental Pressures across Multiple Marine Ecosystems

Tam JC, Link JS, Large SI, Andrews K, Friedland KD, Gove J, Hazen E, Holsman K, Karnauskas M, Samhouri JF, et al. Comparing Apples to Oranges: Common Trends and Thresholds in Anthropogenic and Environmental Pressures across Multiple Marine Ecosystems. Frontiers in Marine Science [Internet]. 2017 ;4. Available from: http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fmars.2017.00282/full
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Ecosystem-based management (EBM) in marine ecosystems considers impacts caused by complex interactions between environmental and anthropogenic pressures (i.e., oceanographic, climatic, socio-economic) and marine communities. EBM depends, in part, on ecological indicators that facilitate understanding of inherent properties and the dynamics of pressures within marine communities. Thresholds of ecological indicators delineate ecosystem status because they represent points at which a small increase in one or many pressure variables results in an abrupt change of ecosystem responses. The difficulty in developing appropriate thresholds and reference points for EBM lies in the multidimensionality of both the ecosystem responses and the pressures impacting the ecosystem. Here, we develop thresholds using gradient forest for a suite of ecological indicators in response to multiple pressures that convey ecosystem status for large marine ecosystems from the US Pacific, Atlantic, sub-Arctic, and Gulf of Mexico. We detected these thresholds of ecological indicators based on multiple pressures. Commercial fisheries landings above approximately 2–4.5 t km−2 and fisheries exploitation above 20–40% of the total estimated biomass (of invertebrates and fish) of the ecosystem resulted in a change in the direction of ecosystem structure and functioning in the ecosystems examined. Our comparative findings reveal common trends in ecosystem thresholds along pressure gradients and also indicate that thresholds of ecological indicators are useful tools for comparing the impacts of environmental and anthropogenic pressures across multiple ecosystems. These critical points can be used to inform the development of EBM decision criteria.

Signatures of the collapse and incipient recovery of an overexploited marine ecosystem

Pedersen EJ, Thompson PL, R. Ball A, Fortin M-J, Gouhier TC, Link H, Moritz C, Nenzen H, Stanley RRE, Taranu ZE, et al. Signatures of the collapse and incipient recovery of an overexploited marine ecosystem. Royal Society Open Science [Internet]. 2017 ;4(7):170215. Available from: http://rsos.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/4/7/170215
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The Northwest Atlantic cod stocks collapsed in the early 1990s and have yet to recover, despite the subsequent establishment of a continuing fishing moratorium. Efforts to understand the collapse and lack of recovery have so far focused mainly on the dynamics of commercially harvested species. Here, we use data from a 33-year scientific trawl survey to determine to which degree the signatures of the collapse and recovery of the cod are apparent in the spatial and temporal dynamics of the broader groundfish community. Over this 33-year period, the groundfish community experienced four phases of change: (i) a period of rapid, synchronous biomass collapse in most species, (ii) followed by a regime shift in community composition with a concomitant loss of functional diversity, (iii) followed in turn by periods of slow compositional recovery, and (iv) slow biomass growth. Our results demonstrate how a community-wide perspective can reveal new aspects of the dynamics of collapse and recovery unavailable from the analysis of individual species or a combination of a small number of species. Overall, we found evidence that such community-level signals should be useful for designing more effective management strategies to ensure the persistence of exploited marine ecosystems.

Improving management of future coastal development in Qatar through ecosystem-based management approaches

Burt JA, Ben-Hamadou R, Abdel-Moati MAR, Fanning L, Kaitibie S, Al-Jamali F, Range P, Saeed S, Warren CS. Improving management of future coastal development in Qatar through ecosystem-based management approaches. Ocean & Coastal Management [Internet]. 2017 ;148:171 - 181. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0964569117302028
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

The coastline of Qatar is a rich mosaic of productive and diverse ecosystems including mangrove forests, intertidal mudflats (sabkha), seagrass beds, and coral reefs. These ecologically interconnected ecosystems contain a substantial proportion of Qatar's total biodiversity, and support an estimated 97% of the >US$ 67 million in annual commercial fisheries, the highest value resource sector after petroleum. The extreme environmental conditions that characterize Qatar has led to fauna that are robust compared with other regions, but makes them highly sensitive to further pressure from anthropogenic stress. These vulnerable ecosystems have come under increasing pressure in recent decades as a result of dramatic expansion of coastal development, and threats to these ecosystems are likely to accelerate in the coming years as Qatar's economy and population continue to grow. Although environmental regulation had historically lagged behind the rapid pace of development, in recent years Qatar's leadership has aggressively expanded environmental management as a result of the growing awareness of the importance of coastal ecosystems. While these improvements are encouraging, management remains challenged by its current sectorial, project-driven focus. Ecosystem-based management (EBM) offers an opportunity to overcome these challenges by integrating impacts from across all major activities in multiple sectors and considering their cumulative effects on ecosystem services and products. While an EBM approach would require modest reprioritizing of existing processes and attention to addressing deficiencies in data needed to support decision making, it has the potential to greatly enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of coastal zone management. The article closes by summarizing a recently initiated research project on coral reefs and seagrass beds in Qatar which can serve as a model for development of the EBM approach for other coastal ecosystems in Qatar.

Quality of tourist beaches of northern Chile: A first approach for ecosystem-based management

González SA, Holtmann-Ahumada G. Quality of tourist beaches of northern Chile: A first approach for ecosystem-based management. Ocean & Coastal Management [Internet]. 2017 ;137:154 - 164. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0964569116304653
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

Tourism focused on the “3Ss” (sun, sand and sea) has increased sharply in recent decades, which has subsequently led to the modification of natural areas of sandy beaches with the implementation of relevant infrastructure to meet the requirements and demands of beach users. Although the development of infrastructure and tourist services has increased for the beaches in northern Chile associated with coastal urban centers, these beaches have not implemented strategies to evaluate and help guide sustainable use. We used different indices to describe the seven state tourist beaches of the Región de Coquimbo. For most of the beaches, based on the Conservation Index (CI) and the Recreation Index (IR), a priority use of an "intensely recreational" character was recommended because of the low potential for conservation. Similarly, most of the beaches showed high levels of urbanization (IU). According to the Beach Quality Index (BQI), the quality of the beaches was assessed at an intermediate level. The application of these indices identified shortcomings in the levels of tourism infrastructure and security offered to users. The function of beaches to protect against natural events was extremely poor, likely because of changes to the beach dune ridges. The incorporation of assessment tools that integrate different indicators to help organize information, prioritize actions, and facilitate decision-making in the sustainable management of tourist beaches is strongly recommended for northern Chile.

Ecosystem modeling in the Gulf of Mexico: current status and future needs to address ecosystem-based fisheries management and restoration activities

O’Farrell H, Grüss A, Sagarese SR, Babcock EA, Rose KA. Ecosystem modeling in the Gulf of Mexico: current status and future needs to address ecosystem-based fisheries management and restoration activities. Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries [Internet]. 2017 ;27(3):587 - 614. Available from: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11160-017-9482-1
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Many ecosystem-based fisheries management (EBFM) measures and restoration projects have been implemented to address the stressors that have negatively affected the United States (U.S.) Gulf of Mexico (GOM). Ecosystem simulation models are useful tools for tackling EBFM and restoration questions. Here, we review the current status of ecosystem modeling efforts for the U.S. GOM and whole GOM large marine ecosystem and identify future needs to address EBFM and restoration in these regions. Existing ecosystem models of the GOM are diverse, ranging from simple conceptual and qualitative models to biogeochemical-based end-to-end models and coupled and hybrid model platforms. Many models have focused on understanding the structure and functioning of GOM ecosystems and the impacts of EBFM measures such as bycatch reduction strategies and marine protected areas. By contrast, a small number of ecosystem models have been used specifically to address the other EBFM issues of the GOM and to assess restoration efforts (e.g., marsh restoration). The demands for EBFM and state and gulf-wide restoration activities will both be increasing in the GOM. Therefore, there is a critical need to better employ and enhance existing ecosystem models of the GOM, and to develop new ecosystem models, to more comprehensively address the different EBFM and restoration needs in the region. We provide suggestions to facilitate this endeavor. The development of consistent libraries of ecosystem models and gap analyses such as ours will help fisheries scientists to effectively tackle specific resource management questions in the different marine regions of the world.

Recommendations on the Use of Ecosystem Modeling for Informing Ecosystem-Based Fisheries Management and Restoration Outcomes in the Gulf of Mexico

Grüss A, Rose KA, Simons J, Ainsworth CH, Babcock EA, Chagaris DD, de Mutsert K, Froeschke J, Himchak P, Kaplan IC, et al. Recommendations on the Use of Ecosystem Modeling for Informing Ecosystem-Based Fisheries Management and Restoration Outcomes in the Gulf of Mexico. Marine and Coastal Fisheries [Internet]. 2017 ;9(1):281 - 295. Available from: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/19425120.2017.1330786
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Ecosystem-based fisheries management (EBFM) and ecosystem restoration are gaining momentum worldwide, including in U.S. waters of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM). Ecosystem models are valuable tools for informing EBFM and restoration activities. In this paper, we provide guidance and a roadmap for ecosystem modeling in the GOM region, with an emphasis on model development and use of model products to inform EBFM and the increasing investments in restoration. We propose eight “best practices” for ecosystem modeling efforts, including (1) identification of priority management questions, (2) scenarios as simulation experiments, (3) calibration and validation needs, (4) sensitivity and uncertainty analyses, (5) ensuring transparency, (6) improving communication between ecosystem modelers and the various stakeholders, (7) documentation of modeling efforts, and (8) maintaining the ecosystem models and codes. Fisheries management in the USA adheres to a prescriptive set of calculations. Therefore, the use of ecosystem modeling in EBFM for the GOM will likely be incremental, starting with the incorporation of environmental variables into single-species assessments, the provision of background (stage-setting) information on environmental and food web effects (e.g., the impacts of lionfish Pterois spp. invasion), and strategic advice through management strategy evaluation. Management questions related to restoration in the GOM (e.g., the impacts of freshwater and sediment diversions as part of coastal restoration, habitat preservation, and rehabilitation; and measures to mitigate nutrient loading and hypoxia) have more flexibility in how they are addressed and thus are primed for immediate use of ecosystem modeling. The questions related to restoration are appropriate for ecosystem modeling, and data collection at the restoration project level can provide critical information for modeling to then scale up to regional responses. Ecosystem modeling efforts need to be initiated and advanced now in order for the tools to be ready in the near future. Addressing resource management issues and questions will benefit greatly from the proper use of ecosystem modeling.

Producing distribution maps for informing ecosystem-based fisheries management using a comprehensive survey database and spatio-temporal models

Grüss A, Thorson JT, Babcock EA, Tarnecki JH. Producing distribution maps for informing ecosystem-based fisheries management using a comprehensive survey database and spatio-temporal models. ICES Journal of Marine Science [Internet]. 2017 . Available from: https://academic.oup.com/icesjms/article-abstract/doi/10.1093/icesjms/fsx120/3958179/Producing-distribution-maps-for-informing
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $42.00
Type: Journal Article

Ecosystem-based fisheries-management (EBFM) is increasingly used in the United States (U.S.), including in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM). Producing distribution maps for marine organisms is a critical step in the implementation of EBFM. In particular, distribution maps are important inputs for many spatially-explicit ecosystem models, such as OSMOSE models, as well as for biophysical models used to predict annual recruitment anomalies due to oceanographic factors. In this study, we applied a recently proposed statistical modelling framework to produce distribution maps for: (i) younger juveniles (ages 0–1) of red snapper (Lutjanus campechanus), red grouper (Epinephelus morio), and gag (Mycteroperca microlepis), so as to be able to define the potential larval settlement areas of the three species in a biophysical model; and (ii) the functional groups and life stages represented in the OSMOSE model of the West Florida Shelf (“OSMOSE-WFS”). This statistical modelling framework consists of: (i) compiling a large database blending all of the encounter/non-encounter data of the GOM collected by the fisheries-independent and fisheries-dependent surveys using random sampling schemes, referred to as the “comprehensive survey database;” (ii) employing the comprehensive survey database to fit spatio-temporal binomial generalized linear mixed models (GLMMs) that integrate the confounding effects of survey and year; and (iii) using the predictions of the fitted spatio-temporal binomial GLMMs to generate distribution maps. This large endeavour allowed us to produce distribution maps for younger juveniles of red snapper, red grouper and gag and nearly all of the other functional groups and life stages represented in OSMOSE-WFS, at different seasons. Using Pearson residuals, the probabilities of encounter predicted by all spatio-temporal binomial GLMMs were demonstrated to be reasonable. Moreover, the results obtained for younger juvenile fish concur with the literature, provide additional insights into the spatial distribution patterns of these life stages, and highlight important future research avenues.

Implementing marine ecosystem-based management: lessons from Australia

Smith DC, Fulton EA, Apfel P, Cresswell ID, Gillanders BM, Haward M, Sainsbury KJ, Smith ADM, Vince J, Ward TM. Implementing marine ecosystem-based management: lessons from Australia. ICES Journal of Marine Science [Internet]. 2017 . Available from: https://academic.oup.com/icesjms/article-abstract/doi/10.1093/icesjms/fsx113/3958176/Implementing-marine-ecosystem-based-management
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $42.00
Type: Journal Article

Ecosystem-based management (EBM) is now widely accepted as the best means of managing the complex interactions in marine systems. However, progress towards implementing and operationalizing it has been slow. We take a pragmatic approach to EBM. Our simple definition is balancing human activities and environmental stewardship in a multiple-use context. In this paper, we present case studies on the development and implementation of EBM in Australia. The case studies (Australia’s Ocean Policy, the Great Barrier Reef, New South Wales (NSW) marine estate, Gladstone Harbour, and South Australia and Spencer Gulf) span different spatial scales, from national to regional to local. They also cover different levels of governance or legislated mandate. We identify the key learnings, necessary components and future needs to support better implementation. These include requirements for clearly identified needs and objectives, stakeholder ownership, well defined governance frameworks, and scientific tools to deal with conflicts and trade-offs. Without all these components, multi-sector management will be difficult and there will be a tendency to maintain a focus on single sectors. While the need to manage individual sectors remains important and is often challenging, this alone will not necessarily ensure sustainable management of marine systems confronted by increasing cumulative impacts.

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