Ecosystem-based Management (EBM)

Marine ecosystem regime shifts: challenges and opportunities for ecosystem-based management

Levin PS, Mollmann C. Marine ecosystem regime shifts: challenges and opportunities for ecosystem-based management. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences [Internet]. 2015 ;370(1659). Available from: http://rstb.royalsocietypublishing.org/cgi/doi/10.1098/rstb.2013.0275
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Regime shifts have been observed in marine ecosystems around the globe. These phenomena can result in dramatic changes in the provision of ecosystem services to coastal communities. Accounting for regime shifts in management clearly requires integrative, ecosystem-based management (EBM) approaches. EBM has emerged as an accepted paradigm for ocean management worldwide, yet, despite the rapid and intense development of EBM theory, implementation has languished, and many implemented or proposed EBM schemes largely ignore the special characteristics of regime shifts. Here, we first explore key aspects of regime shifts that are of critical importance to EBM, and then suggest how regime shifts can be better incorporated into EBM using the concept of integrated ecosystem assessment (IEA). An IEA uses approaches that determine the likelihood that ecological or socio-economic properties of systems will move beyond or return to acceptable bounds as defined by resource managers and policy makers. We suggest an approach for implementing IEAs for cases of regime shifts where the objectives are either avoiding an undesired state or returning to a desired condition. We discuss the suitability and short-comings of methods summarizing the status of ecosystem components, screening and prioritizing potential risks, and evaluating alternative management strategies. IEAs are evolving as an EBM approach that can address regime shifts; however, advances in statistical, analytical and simulation modelling are needed before IEAs can robustly inform tactical management in systems characterized by regime shifts.

Theoretical basis for predicting climate-induced abrupt shifts in the oceans

Beaugrand G. Theoretical basis for predicting climate-induced abrupt shifts in the oceans. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences [Internet]. 2015 ;370(1659). Available from: http://rstb.royalsocietypublishing.org/cgi/doi/10.1098/rstb.2013.0264
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Among the responses of marine species and their ecosystems to climate change, abrupt community shifts (ACSs), also called regime shifts, have often been observed. However, despite their effects for ecosystem functioning and both provisioning and regulating services, our understanding of the underlying mechanisms involved remains elusive. This paper proposes a theory showing that some ACSs originate from the interaction between climate-induced environmental changes and the species ecological niche. The theory predicts that a substantial stepwise shift in the thermal regime of a marine ecosystem leads indubitably to an ACS and explains why some species do not change during the phenomenon. It also explicates why the timing of ACSs may differ or why some studies may detect or not detect a shift in the same ecosystem, independently of the statistical method of detection and simply because they focus on different species or taxonomic groups. The present theory offers a way to predict future climate-induced community shifts and their potential associated trophic cascades and amplifications.

Regime shifts in exploited marine food webs: detecting mechanisms underlying alternative stable states using size-structured community dynamics theory

Gardmark A, Casini M, Huss M, van Leeuwen A, Hjelm J, Persson L, de Roos AM. Regime shifts in exploited marine food webs: detecting mechanisms underlying alternative stable states using size-structured community dynamics theory. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences [Internet]. 2015 ;370(1659). Available from: http://rstb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/370/1659/20130262
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Many marine ecosystems have undergone ‘regime shifts’, i.e. abrupt reorganizations across trophic levels. Establishing whether these constitute shifts between alternative stable states is of key importance for the prospects of ecosystem recovery and for management. We show how mechanisms underlying alternative stable states caused by predator–prey interactions can be revealed in field data, using analyses guided by theory on size-structured community dynamics. This is done by combining data on individual performance (such as growth and fecundity) with information on population size and prey availability. We use Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) and their prey in the Baltic Sea as an example to discuss and distinguish two types of mechanisms, ‘cultivation-depensation’ and ‘overcompensation’, that can cause alternative stable states preventing the recovery of overexploited piscivorous fish populations. Importantly, the type of mechanism can be inferred already from changes in the predators' body growth in different life stages. Our approach can thus be readily applied to monitored stocks of piscivorous fish species, for which this information often can be assembled. Using this tool can help resolve the causes of catastrophic collapses in marine predatory–prey systems and guide fisheries managers on how to successfully restore collapsed piscivorous fish stocks.

Resilience indicators: prospects and limitations for early warnings of regime shifts

Dakos V, Carpenter SR, van Nes EH, Scheffer M. Resilience indicators: prospects and limitations for early warnings of regime shifts. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences [Internet]. 2015 ;370(1659). Available from: http://rstb.royalsocietypublishing.org/cgi/doi/10.1098/rstb.2013.0263
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

In the vicinity of tipping points—or more precisely bifurcation points—ecosystems recover slowly from small perturbations. Such slowness may be interpreted as a sign of low resilience in the sense that the ecosystem could easily be tipped through a critical transition into a contrasting state. Indicators of this phenomenon of ‘critical slowing down (CSD)’ include a rise in temporal correlation and variance. Such indicators of CSD can provide an early warning signal of a nearby tipping point. Or, they may offer a possibility to rank reefs, lakes or other ecosystems according to their resilience. The fact that CSD may happen across a wide range of complex ecosystems close to tipping points implies a powerful generality. However, indicators of CSD are not manifested in all cases where regime shifts occur. This is because not all regime shifts are associated with tipping points. Here, we review the exploding literature about this issue to provide guidance on what to expect and what not to expect when it comes to the CSD-based early warning signals for critical transitions.

Marine regime shifts around the globe: theory, drivers and impacts

Mollmann C, Folke C, Edwards M, Conversi A. Marine regime shifts around the globe: theory, drivers and impacts. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences [Internet]. 2015 ;370(1659). Available from: http://rstb.royalsocietypublishing.org/cgi/doi/10.1098/rstb.2013.0260
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Introduction to theme issue ‘Marine regime shifts around the globe: theory, drivers and impacts’ compiled and edited by Alessandra Conversi, Christian Möllmann, Carl Folke and Martin Edwards.

Challenges for mainstreaming Ecosystem-based Adaptation into the international climate agenda

Ojea E. Challenges for mainstreaming Ecosystem-based Adaptation into the international climate agenda. Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability [Internet]. 2015 ;14:41 - 48. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1877343515000354
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Ecosystem-based Adaptation promotes the sustainable use of biodiversity and ecosystem services to adapt to climate change, and has been defended as an effective and cost-efficient way of reducing climate change impacts. In fact, there is a growing recognition of the role that healthy ecosystems play in helping people to adapt to climate change, but Ecosystem-based Adaptation is only starting to be incorporated to policy and its role is so far limited to complement (not substitute) more traditional adaptation measures. This paper reviews recent literature on Ecosystem-based Adaptation and looks for the main reasons for this delay by identifying key areas that need more attention from scientists and policymakers in order to incorporate Ecosystem-based Adaptation into the international climate policy agenda. Main challenges relate to governance structures and participation, how to measure effectiveness, the incorporation of longer-term scales for management, appropriate financial mechanisms, and dealing with climate change and ecosystem science inherent uncertainties.

Key principles of marine ecosystem-based management

Long RD, Charles A, Stephenson RL. Key principles of marine ecosystem-based management. Marine Policy [Internet]. 2015 ;57:53 - 60. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308597X1500024X
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Ecosystem-Based Management (EBM) has gained international popularity in recent years, but the lack of consensus on its definition has precluded the use of a universal implementation framework. The large number and variety of principles that make up EBM, and the diversity in perspectives among key management players, has impeded the practical application of EBM. Agreement on a list of the essential ingredients of EBM is vital to successful application. A frequency analysis of EBM principles was conducted to identify the Key Principles that currently define EBM, from a list of twenty-six principles extracted from a subset of the EBM theoretical/conceptual literature (covering a range of published sources across disciplines and application types). Fifteen Key Principles were identified (in descending frequency of appearance in the literature): Consider Ecosystem Connections, Appropriate Spatial & Temporal Scales, Adaptive Management, Use of Scientific Knowledge, Integrated Management, Stakeholder Involvement, Account for Dynamic Nature of Ecosystems, Ecological Integrity & Biodiversity, Sustainability, Recognise Coupled Social-Ecological Systems, Decisions reflect Societal Choice, Distinct Boundaries, Interdisciplinarity, Appropriate Monitoring, and Acknowledge Uncertainty. This paper also examines the development of EBM principles over time, leading to predictions on the directions EBM will take in the future. The frequency analysis methodology used here can be replicated to update the Key Principles of EBM in the future. Indeed, further research on potential emerging Key Principles such as ‘Consider Cumulative Impacts’, ‘Apply the Precautionary Approach’ and ‘Explicitly Acknowledge Trade Offs’ will help shape EBM and its successful application in the management of marine activities.

Temporal constraints on ecosystem management: definitions and examples from Europe’s regional seas

O'Higgins T, Cooper P, Roth E, Newton A, Farmer A, Goulding IC, Tett P. Temporal constraints on ecosystem management: definitions and examples from Europe’s regional seas. Ecology and Society [Internet]. 2014 ;19(4). Available from: http://www.ecologyandsociety.org/vol19/iss4/art46/
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Our ability to meet environmental targets is often constrained by processes and events that occur over long timescales and which may not be considered during the planning process. We illustrate with examples and define three major types of temporal scale phenomena of relevance to marine managers: Memory and Future Effects (jointly called Legacy Effects) and Committed Behaviors. We examine the role of these effects in achieving marine environmental targets in Europe under the Marine Strategy Framework Directive and the implications for future management, indicating the increased importance that these temporal phenomena give to reducing future pressures.

Detecting critical choke points for achieving Good Environmental Status in European seas

Potts T, O'Higgins T, Brennan R, Cinnirella S, Brandt USteiner, de Vivero JLuís Suá, van Beusekom J, Troost TA, Paltriguera L, Hosgor AGunduz. Detecting critical choke points for achieving Good Environmental Status in European seas. Ecology and Society [Internet]. 2015 ;20(1). Available from: http://www.ecologyandsociety.org/vol20/iss1/art29/
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Choke points are social, cultural, political, institutional, or psychological obstructions of social-ecological systems that constrain progress toward an environmental objective. Using a soft systems methodology, different types of chokes points were identified in the Outer Hebrides of Scotland, the Baltic, and the North and Mediterranean seas. The choke points were of differing types: cultural and political choke points were identified in Barra and the Mediterranean, respectively, whereas the choke points in the North Sea and Baltic Sea were dependent on differing values toward the mitigation of eutrophication. We conclude with suggestions to identify and address choke points.

An ecosystem-based approach to evaluate the ecological quality of Mediterranean undersea caves

Rastorgueff P-A, Bellan-Santini D, Bianchi CNike, Bussotti S, Chevaldonné P, Guidetti P, Harmelin J-G, Montefalcone M, Morri C, Perez T, et al. An ecosystem-based approach to evaluate the ecological quality of Mediterranean undersea caves. Ecological Indicators [Internet]. 2015 ;54:137 - 152. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1470160X15000916
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

A theoretical model of structure and functioning was constructed for the Mediterranean undersea cave ecosystem. This model integrates almost all representative components of the cave ecosystem and gives an idea of their faunal compositions, characteristics and related interactions.

This model constitutes the basis of the Ecosystem-Based Quality Index (EBQI) of the European Union's Marine Strategy Framework Directive, which aims at evaluating the ecological quality of an ecosystem. It is based on four crucial complementary elements: (i) each component was weighted in accordance with its importance in determining the structure and functioning of the cave ecosystem; (ii) a suite of relevant parameters were defined to assess the ecological state of each component of the cave ecosystem; (iii) these parameters were aggregated into one relevant index, the Cave EBQI (CavEBQI), to summarize the quality evaluation for each cave site; (iv) each value of ecological state is accompanied by a Confidence Index as a measure of its reliability.

The CavEBQI was used on 22 Mediterranean undersea caves of France and Italy. Disparities of ecological quality were found among caves but most of them ranged from moderate to high ecological quality. For some caves, no conclusion can be drawn when our method predicts a poor reliability of the evaluation of their ecological quality.

This ecosystem-based evaluation of the quality of undersea caves seems to be a powerful tool, with the advantage of being based on almost all its components, rather than just on a few species. It is accompanied by a measure of its reliability, hence it provides a reliable idea of the ecological state of the entire ecosystem at each cave site. Monitoring the ecological state of caves and the effects of disturbances over large geographic and temporal scales is made possible with CavEBQI. Applying the same method to other ecosystems, can provide an integrated view of a marine region, which is essential when addressing questions about protection, conservation and restoration.

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