Human Impacts on the Environment

Bottom trawl fishing footprints on the world’s continental shelves

Amoroso RO, C. Pitcher R, Rijnsdorp AD, McConnaughey RA, Parma AM, Suuronen P, Eigaard OR, Bastardie F, Hintzen NT, Althaus F, et al. Bottom trawl fishing footprints on the world’s continental shelves. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences [Internet]. 2018 :201802379. Available from: http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2018/10/03/1802379115
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Bottom trawlers land around 19 million tons of fish and invertebrates annually, almost one-quarter of wild marine landings. The extent of bottom trawling footprint (seabed area trawled at least once in a specified region and time period) is often contested but poorly described. We quantify footprints using high-resolution satellite vessel monitoring system (VMS) and logbook data on 24 continental shelves and slopes to 1,000-m depth over at least 2 years. Trawling footprint varied markedly among regions: from <10% of seabed area in Australian and New Zealand waters, the Aleutian Islands, East Bering Sea, South Chile, and Gulf of Alaska to >50% in some European seas. Overall, 14% of the 7.8 million-km2 study area was trawled, and 86% was not trawled. Trawling activity was aggregated; the most intensively trawled areas accounting for 90% of activity comprised 77% of footprint on average. Regional swept area ratio (SAR; ratio of total swept area trawled annually to total area of region, a metric of trawling intensity) and footprint area were related, providing an approach to estimate regional trawling footprints when high-resolution spatial data are unavailable. If SAR was ≤0.1, as in 8 of 24 regions, there was >95% probability that >90% of seabed was not trawled. If SAR was 7.9, equal to the highest SAR recorded, there was >95% probability that >70% of seabed was trawled. Footprints were smaller and SAR was ≤0.25 in regions where fishing rates consistently met international sustainability benchmarks for fish stocks, implying collateral environmental benefits from sustainable fishing.

Distribution, uses, and anthropic pressures on reef ecosystems of Mexico

Santander-Monsalvo J, Espejel I, Ortiz-Lozano L. Distribution, uses, and anthropic pressures on reef ecosystems of Mexico. Ocean & Coastal Management [Internet]. 2018 ;165:39 - 51. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0964569118301248
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

Reef ecosystems are amply distributed and ecologically relevant in Mexico, however, there is not an integrated inventory of these ecosystems, and information about uses and pressures is disperse. With the aim of generating updated information that allows to know the presence and distribution of the different types of reefs (coral, rocky-coral, rocky, and rocky with Macrocystis pyrifera), as well as to know the uses and pressures to which they are subjected. In this article we present an inventory of the 755 reef ecosystems known in Mexico based in a literature review of 194 documents and validated by informal interviews to key Mexican experts. Mexican reefs are distributed in seven regions identified for reef management purposes, according to the combination of eight maritime regionalization proposals of the Mexican seas. The main uses of reef ecosystems are fishing, tourism, nautical, and mining, which produce eight main pressures: pollution, habitat fragmentation, coral bleaching, overfishing, exotic species introduction, sedimentation, coral mortality, and coral diseases. These uses and pressures are distributed heterogeneously in the seven reef regions. The main conservation tool used by Mexican Federal Government to protect these reefs are the Marine Protected Areas (MPAs). Almost 45% of the listed reefs are within one of the 30 Mexican MPAs, being the coral reefs the ones that predominate in this protection scheme. In this research we present relevant information for the management of the reef ecosystems of Mexico, which support the debate on the analysis of public policies for their conservation.

Ocean sprawl facilitates dispersal and connectivity of protected species

Henry L-A, Mayorga-Adame CG, Fox AD, Polton JA, Ferris JS, McLellan F, McCabe C, Kutti T, J. Roberts M. Ocean sprawl facilitates dispersal and connectivity of protected species. Scientific Reports [Internet]. 2018 ;8(1). Available from: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-29575-4
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Highly connected networks generally improve resilience in complex systems. We present a novel application of this paradigm and investigated the potential for anthropogenic structures in the ocean to enhance connectivity of a protected species threatened by human pressures and climate change. Biophysical dispersal models of a protected coral species simulated potential connectivity between oil and gas installations across the North Sea but also metapopulation outcomes for naturally occurring corals downstream. Network analyses illustrated how just a single generation of virtual larvae released from these installations could create a highly connected anthropogenic system, with larvae becoming competent to settle over a range of natural deep-sea, shelf and fjord coral ecosystems including a marine protected area. These results provide the first study showing that a system of anthropogenic structures can have international conservation significance by creating ecologically connected networks and by acting as stepping stones for cross-border interconnection to natural populations.

A review of potential impacts of submarine power cables on the marine environment: Knowledge gaps, recommendations and future directions

Taormina B, Bald J, Want A, Thouzeau G, Lejart M, Desroy N, Carlier A. A review of potential impacts of submarine power cables on the marine environment: Knowledge gaps, recommendations and future directions. Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews [Internet]. 2018 ;96:380 - 391. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1364032118305355
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $37.95
Type: Journal Article

Submarine power cables (SPC) have been in use since the mid-19th century, but environmental concerns about them are much more recent. With the development of marine renewable energy technologies, it is vital to understand their potential impacts. The commissioning of SPC may temporarily or permanently impact the marine environment through habitat damage or loss, noise, chemical pollution, heat and electromagnetic field emissions, risk of entanglement, introduction of artificial substrates, and the creation of reserve effects. While growing numbers of scientific publications focus on impacts of the marine energy harnessing devices, data on impacts of associated power connections such as SPC are scarce and knowledge gaps persist. The present study (1) examines the different categories of potential ecological effects of SPC during installation, operation and decommissioning phases and hierarchizes these types of interactions according to their ecological relevance and existing scientific knowledge, (2) identifies the main knowledge gaps and needs for research, and (3) sets recommendations for better monitoring and mitigation of the most significant impacts. Overall, ecological impacts associated with SPC can be considered weak or moderate, although many uncertainties remain, particularly concerning electromagnetic effects.

Identifying important species that amplify or mitigate the interactive effects of human impacts to marine food webs

Griffith GP, Strutton PG, Semmens JM, Fulton EA. Identifying important species that amplify or mitigate the interactive effects of human impacts to marine food webs. Conservation Biology [Internet]. 2018 . Available from: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/cobi.13202
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $38.00
Type: Journal Article

Some species may be more important in transferring the complex effects of multiple human stressors through marine food‐webs. Here we show a novel approach to help inform conservation management in identifying such species. Simulating changes in biomass between species from the interaction effects of ocean warming and ocean acidification, and fisheries to year 2050 on the south‐eastern Australian marine system, we constructed annual interaction effect networks (IEN's). Each IEN was composed of the species linked by either an additive (sum of the individual stressor response), synergistic (lower biomass compared with additive effects) or antagonistic (greater biomass compared with additive effects) response. Structurally, over the simulation period, the number of species and links in the synergistic IEN's increased and the network structure became more stable. The stability of the antagonistic IEN's decreased and became more vulnerable to the loss of species. In contrast, there was no change in the structural attributes of species linked by an additive response. Using indices of species importance common in food‐web and network theory, we identified the most important species within each IEN for transferring the interaction stressor effect on changes in biomass via local, intermediate and global interaction pathways. Mid trophic level mesopelagic fish species were most often identified as the key species within the synergistic IEN's and phytoplankton or zooplankton within the antagonistic IEN's. For the additive response commonly assumed in conservation management demersal fish species were identified by all of the indices. Apart from identifying the most important species, we also identified other important species for transferring the different interaction effects. Knowing the most important species for transferring synergistic or antagonistic responses may help inform conservation strategies for conserving ecosystems under increasing multiple stressor impacts.

Mapping ecological indicators of human impact with statistical and machine learning methods: Tests on the California coast

Stock A, Haupt AJ, Mach M, Micheli F. Mapping ecological indicators of human impact with statistical and machine learning methods: Tests on the California coast. Ecological Informatics [Internet]. In Press . Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1574954118300736
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Coastal ecosystems are exposed to multiple anthropogenic stressors such as fishing, pollution, and climate change. Ecosystem-based coastal management requires understanding where the combination of multiple stressors has large cumulative effects and where actions to address impacts are most urgently needed. However, the effects of multiple stressors on coastal and marine ecosystems are often non-linear and interactive. This complexity is not captured by commonly used spatial models for mapping human impacts. Flexible statistical and machine learning models like random forests have thus been used as an alternative modeling approach to identify important stressors and to make spatial predictions of their combined effects. However, tests of such models' prediction skill have been limited. Therefore, we tested how well ten statistical and machine learning methods predicted three ecological indicators of coastal marine ecosystem condition (kelp biodiversity, fish biomass, and rocky intertidal biodiversity) off California, USA. Spatial data representing anthropogenic stressors and ocean uses as well as natural gradients were used as predictors. The models' prediction errors were estimated by double spatial block cross-validation. The best models achieved mean squared errors about 25% lower than a null model for kelp biodiversity and fish biomass; none of the tested models worked well for rocky intertidal biodiversity. The models captured general trends, but not local variability of the indicators. For kelp biodiversity, the best performing method was principal components regression. For fish biomass, the best performing method was boosted regression trees. However, after tuning, this model did not include any interactions between stressors, and ridge regression (a constrained linear model) performed almost as well. While in theory flexible machine learning methods are required to represent the complex stressor-ecosystem state relationships revealed by experimental ecologists, with our data, this flexibility could not be harnessed because more flexible models overfitted due to small sample sizes and low signal-to-noise ratio. The main challenge for harnessing the flexibility of statistical and machine learning methods to link ecological indicators and anthropogenic stressors is obtaining more suitable data. In particular, better data describing the spatial and temporal distribution of human uses and stressors are needed. We conclude by discussing methodological implications for future research.

Can coastal scenery be managed? The Valparaíso region, Chile as a case study

Rangel-Buitrago N, Contreras-López M, Martínez C, Williams A. Can coastal scenery be managed? The Valparaíso region, Chile as a case study. Ocean & Coastal Management [Internet]. 2018 ;163:383 - 400. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0964569118303223
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

Coastal tourism developed along the Valparaíso region of Chile is being threatened by a very particular issue: scenery degradation related to extreme urbanization and collateral effects. This paper presents the results of scenic evaluation of 96 sites along this region. The scenic evaluation assesses values from a checklist of 18 physical and 8 human parameters, and permits calculation of a scenic evaluation index (D Value), which classifies coastal sites into five classes: Class I, usually natural areas of top scenic characteristics, to Class V, poor scenic natural areas with a higher impact of human interventions. In summary, 14 sites (15%) appeared in Class I; 7 (7%) in Class II; 9 (9%) in Class III; 17 (18%) in Class IV and 49 sites (51%) in Class V. This evaluation provides a complete scenic assessment overview of the Valparaiso Region, allowing implementation of an adequate management strategy based on knowledge of coastal scenery for the maintenance and preservation of scenic quality.

The Location and Protection Status of Earth’s Diminishing Marine Wilderness

Jones KR, Klein CJ, Halpern BS, Venter O, Grantham H, Kuempel CD, Shumway N, Friedlander AM, Possingham HP, Watson JEM. The Location and Protection Status of Earth’s Diminishing Marine Wilderness. Current Biology [Internet]. 2018 . Available from: https://www.cell.com/current-biology/fulltext/S0960-9822(18)30772-3
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $31.50
Type: Journal Article

As human activities increasingly threaten biodiversity [1, 2], areas devoid of intense human impacts are vital refugia [3]. These wilderness areas contain high genetic diversity, unique functional traits, and endemic species [4, 5, 6, 7]; maintain high levels of ecological and evolutionary connectivity [8, 9, 10]; and may be well placed to resist and recover from the impacts of climate change [11, 12, 13]. On land, rapid declines in wilderness [3] have led to urgent calls for its protection [3, 14]. In contrast, little is known about the extent and protection of marine wilderness [4, 5]. Here we systematically map marine wilderness globally by identifying areas that have both very little impact (lowest 10%) from 15 anthropogenic stressors and also a very low combined cumulative impact from these stressors. We discover that ∼13% of the ocean meets this definition of global wilderness, with most being located in the high seas. Recognizing that human influence differs across ocean regions, we repeat the analysis within each of the 16 ocean realms [15]. Realm-specific wilderness extent varies considerably, with >16 million km2 (8.6%) in the Warm Indo-Pacific, down to <2,000 km2 (0.5%) in Temperate Southern Africa. We also show that the marine protected area estate holds only 4.9% of global wilderness and 4.1% of realm-specific wilderness, very little of which is in biodiverse ecosystems such as coral reefs. Proactive retention of marine wilderness should now be incorporated into global strategies aimed at conserving biodiversity and ensuring that large-scale ecological and evolutionary processes continue.

Conflicts in the coastal zone: human impacts on commercially important fish species utilizing coastal habitat

Brown EJ, Vasconcelos RP, Wennhage H, Bergström U, Støttrup JG, van de Wolfshaar K, Millisenda G, Colloca F, Le Pape O. Conflicts in the coastal zone: human impacts on commercially important fish species utilizing coastal habitat. ICES Journal of Marine Science [Internet]. 2018 ;75(4):1203 - 1213. Available from: https://academic.oup.com/icesjms/article-abstract/75/4/1203/4788357?redirectedFrom=fulltext
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $44.00
Type: Journal Article

Coastal ecosystems are ecologically, culturally, and economically important, and hence are under pressure from diverse human activities. We reviewed the literature for existing evidence of effects of human-induced habitat changes on exploited fish utilizing coastal habitats. We focused on fish species of the Northeast Atlantic for which fisheries advice is provided by International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES) and which utilize coastal habitats for at least one life-history stage (LHS). We found that 92% of these species are impacted by human activity in at least one LHS while utilizing coastal habitat and 38% in multiple stages. Anthropogenic pressures most commonly shown to impact these fish species were toxicants and pollutants (75% of species). Eutrophication and anoxia, invasive species, and physical coastal development affected about half of the species (58, 54, and 42% of species, respectively), while indirect fishing impacts affected a minority (17% of species). Moreover, 71% of the ICES advice species that utilize coastal habitats face impacts from more than one pressure, implying cumulative effects. Given that three-fourths of the commercial landings come from fish species utilizing coastal habitats, there is an obvious need for a better understanding of the impacts that human activities cause in these habitats for the development of ecosystem-based fisheries management.

The Effects of Anthropogenic Stressors on Reproduction and Recruitment of Corals and Reef Organisms

Richmond RH, Tisthammer KH, Spies NP. The Effects of Anthropogenic Stressors on Reproduction and Recruitment of Corals and Reef Organisms. Frontiers in Marine Science [Internet]. 2018 ;5. Available from: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2018.00226/full
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The persistence of populations of marine organisms depends on the success of the dual processes of reproduction and recruitment. The production of offspring alone is inconsequential unless larvae and propagules can recruit, which often entails a period of development and distribution in the water column and subsequent selection of appropriate habitats. For fish, this may mean drifting in currents before responding to particular habitat cues. For corals and other benthic invertebrates, larvae must undergo site selection, settlement and metamorphosis into the juvenile form, and survivorship is directly linked to site choice and environmental conditions. Both biotic and abiotic factors affect population replenishment success, and hence, anthropogenic influences such as pollution, sedimentation and climate change can negatively affect critical processes such as reproductive synchronization in spawning species, successful embryological development, appropriate site selection, settlement, metamorphosis and in the case of reef building corals, acquisition of the required zooxanthellae partner. Effective management practices are essential for ensuring the persistence of populations of coral reef organisms of economic, cultural and ecological value.

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