Human Impacts on the Environment

Spearfishing modulates flight initiation distance of fishes: the effects of protection, individual size, and bearing a speargun

Sbragaglia V, Morroni L, Bramanti L, Weitzmann B, Arlinghaus R, Azzurro E. Spearfishing modulates flight initiation distance of fishes: the effects of protection, individual size, and bearing a speargun. ICES Journal of Marine Science [Internet]. 2018 . Available from: https://academic.oup.com/icesjms/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/icesjms/fsy059/5032467?redirectedFrom=fulltext
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $44.00
Type: Journal Article

In a landscape of fear, humans are altering key behaviours of wild-living animals, including those related to foraging, reproduction, and survival. When exposed to potentially lethal human actions, such as hunting or fishing, fish, and wildlife are expected to behaviourally respond by becoming shyer and learning when to be cautious. Using a rich dataset collected in temperate rocky reefs, we provide evidence of spearfishing-induced behavioural changes in five coastal fish taxa, exposed to different levels of spearfishing exploitation, by using flight initiation distance (FID) as a proxy of predator avoidance. We detected a significant increase of mean and size effects of FID when the observer was equipped with a speargun. Such effects were more evident outside marine protected areas where spearfishing was allowed and was commensurate to the historically spearfishing pressure of each investigated taxon. Our results demonstrate the ability of fish to develop fine-tuned antipredator responses and to recognize the risks posed by spearfishers as human predators. This capacity is likely acquired by learning, but harvest-induced truncation of the behavioural diversity and fisheries-induced evolution may also play a role and help to explain the increased timidity shown by the exploited fishes in our study.

Reducing marine eutrophication may require a paradigmatic change

Desmit X, Thieu V, Billen G, Campuzano F, Dulière V, Garnier J, Lassaletta L, Ménesguen A, Neves R, Pinto L, et al. Reducing marine eutrophication may require a paradigmatic change. Science of The Total Environment [Internet]. 2018 ;635:1444 - 1466. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0048969718313603?_rdoc=1&_fmt=high&_origin=gateway&_docanchor=&md5=b8429449ccfc9c30159a5f9aeaa92ffb
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Marine eutrophication in the North-East Atlantic (NEA) strongly relies on nutrient enrichment at the river outlets, which is linked to human activities and land use in the watersheds. The question is whether human society can reduce its nutrient emissions by changing land use without compromising food security. A new version of Riverstrahler model (pyNuts-Riverstrahler) was designed to estimate the point and diffuse nutrient emissions (N, P, Si) to the rivers depending on land use in the watersheds across a large domain (Western Europe agro-food systems, waste water treatment). The loads from the river model have been used as inputs to three marine ecological models (PCOMS, ECO-MARS3D, MIRO&CO) covering together a large part of the NEA from the Iberian shelf to the Southern North Sea. The modelling of the land-ocean continuum allowed quantifying the impact of changes in land use on marine eutrophication. Pristine conditions were tested to scale the current eutrophication with respect to a “natural background” (sensu WFD), i.e. forested watersheds without any anthropogenic impact. Three scenarios representing potential management options were also tested to propose future perspectives in mitigating eutrophication. This study shows that a significant decrease in nitrogen fluxes from land to sea is possible by adapting human activities in the watersheds, preventing part of the eutrophication symptoms in the NEA rivers and adjacent coastal zones. It is also shown that any significant achievement in that direction would very likely require paradigmatic changes at social, economic and agricultural levels. This requires reshaping the connections between crop production and livestock farming, and between agriculture and local human food consumption. It also involves cultural changes such as less waste production and a shift towards lower-impact and healthier diets where half of the animal products consumption is replaced by vegetal proteins consumption, known as a demitarian diet (http://www.nine-esf.org/node/281/index.html).

Anthropogenic Impacts on the Welfare of Wild Marine Mammals

de Vere AJ, Lilley MK, Frick EE. Anthropogenic Impacts on the Welfare of Wild Marine Mammals. Aquatic Mammals [Internet]. 2018 ;44(2):150 - 180. Available from: https://www.aquaticmammalsjournal.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=1749:anthropogenic-impacts-on-the-welfare-of-wild-marine-mammals&catid=167&Itemid=326
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Marine mammal welfare has most frequently been a topic of discussion in reference to captive animals. However, humans have altered the marine environment in such dramatic and varied ways that the welfare of wild marine mammals is also important to consider as most current publications regarding anthropogenic impacts focus on population-level effects. While the preservation of the species is extremely important, so too are efforts to mitigate the pain and suffering of marine mammals affected by noise pollution, chemical pollution, marine debris, and ever-increasing numbers of vessels. The aim of this review is to define welfare for wild marine mammals and to discuss a number of key anthropogenic effects that are currently impacting their welfare.

Protection alone may not promote natural recovery of biogenic habitats of high biodiversity damaged by mobile fishing gears

Fariñas-Franco JM, A. Allcock L, Roberts D. Protection alone may not promote natural recovery of biogenic habitats of high biodiversity damaged by mobile fishing gears. Marine Environmental Research [Internet]. 2018 ;135:18 - 28. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0141113617304658
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
Yes
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

The horse mussel Modiolus modiolus (L.) is a large marine bivalve that aggregates to create complex habitats of high biodiversity. As a keystone species, M. modiolusis of great importance for the functioning of marine benthic ecosystems, forming biogenic habitats used to designate Marine Protected Areas (MPAs). The present study investigates the condition of M. modiolus beds historically subjected to intense scallop fishing using mobile fishing gears. The study, conducted seven years after the introduction of legislation banning all forms of fishing, aimed to establish whether natural habitat recovery occurs after protection measures are put in place.

Lower biodiversity and up to 80% decline in densities of M. modiolus were recorded across the current distributional range of the species in Strangford Lough, Northern Ireland. The decline in biodiversity in most areas surveyed was consistent with that observed in biogenic reefs impacted by mobile fishing gears elsewhere. Epifauna, including sponges, hydroids and tunicates, experienced the most substantial decline in biodiversity, with up to 64% fewer taxa recorded in 2010 compared with 2003. Higher variability in community composition and a shift towards faunal assemblages dominated by opportunistic infaunal species typical of softer substrata were also detected. Based on these observations we suggest that, for biogenic habitats, the designation of MPAs and the introduction of fishing bans alone may not be sufficient to reverse or halt the negative effects caused by past anthropogenic impacts. Direct intervention, including habitat restoration based on translocation of native keystone species, should be considered as part of management strategies for MPAs which host similar biogenic reef habitats where condition and natural recovery have been compromised.

A predictive model based on multiple coastal anthropogenic pressures explains the degradation status of a marine ecosystem: Implications for management and conservation

Holon F, Marre G, Parravicini V, Mouquet N, Bockel T, Descamp P, Tribot A-S, Boissery P, Deter J. A predictive model based on multiple coastal anthropogenic pressures explains the degradation status of a marine ecosystem: Implications for management and conservation. Biological Conservation [Internet]. 2018 ;222:125 - 135. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006320717307115#!
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

During the last fifty years, there has been a dramatic increase in the development of anthropogenic activities, and this is particularly threatening to marine coastal ecosystems. The management of these multiple and simultaneous anthropogenic pressures requires reliable and precise data on their distribution, as well as information (data, modelling) on their potential effects on sensitive ecosystems. Focusing on Posidonia oceanicabeds, a threatened habitat-forming seagrass species endemic to the Mediterranean, we developed a statistical approach to study the complex relationship between human multiple activities and ecosystem status. We used Random Forest modelling to explain the degradation status of P. oceanica (defined herein as the shift from seagrass bed to dead matte) as a function of depth and 10 anthropogenic pressures along the French Mediterranean coast (1700 km of coastline including Corsica). Using a 50 × 50 m grid cells dataset, we obtained a particularly accurate model explaining 71.3% of the variance, with a Pearson correlation of 0.84 between predicted and observed values. Human-made coastline, depth, coastal population, urbanization, and agriculture were the best global predictors of P. oceanica's degradation status. Aquaculture was the least important predictor, although its local individual influence was among the highest. Non-linear relationship between predictors and seagrass beds status was detected with tipping points (i.e. thresholds) for all variables except agriculture and industrial effluents. Using these tipping points, we built a map representing the coastal seagrass beds classified into four categories according to an increasing pressure gradient and its risk of phase shift. Our approach provides important information that can be used to help managers preserve this essential and endangered ecosystem.

There is no Planet B: A healthy Earth requires greater parity between space and marine research

Elliott M. There is no Planet B: A healthy Earth requires greater parity between space and marine research. Marine Pollution Bulletin [Internet]. 2018 ;130:28-30. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025326X18301607
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $55.20
Type: Journal Article

Exploring our planetary boundaries (i.e. the safe operating space for humanity) has demonstrated that we have already exceeded three of the 10 defined variables which support our wellbeing: the rate of biodiversity loss, the biogeochemical fluxes of nitrogen and climate change (Rockström et al., 2009Steffen et al., 2015). Recently more than 15,000 international scientists have warned that humanity was exceeding the limits of the planet (Ripple et al., 2017). Similarly, in marine ecosystems, biogeochemical fluxes and biosphere integrity exceed their safe boundaries (Nash et al., 2017). Despite the uncertainties and criticisms of the methodologies applied (Montoya et al., 2018), those authors agree that “it would be unwise to drive the Earth System substantially away from a Holocene-like condition. A continuing trajectory away from the Holocene could lead, with an uncomfortably high probability, to a very different state of the Earth System, one that is likely to be much less hospitable to the development of human societies” ( Steffen et al., 2015).

Tidal range and recovery from the impacts mechanical beach grooming

Griffin C, Day N, Rosenquist H, Wellenreuther M, Bunnefeld N, Gilburn AS. Tidal range and recovery from the impacts mechanical beach grooming. Ocean & Coastal Management [Internet]. 2018 ;154:66 - 71. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0964569117307056
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

Mechanical grooming to remove litter and wrack from sandy beaches reduces strandline biodiversity. The impact of tidal range on recovery rates of strandline ecosystems after grooming has not been examined to date, even though tidal range is known to affect the spatial and temporal patterns of seaweed. We compared taxon richness of macroinvertebrates that occur all year round at 104 sites on two coastlines at similar latitudes in Northern Europe that have pronounced differences in tidal range. Macroinvertebrate taxon richness was positively correlated with algae depth on both groomed and ungroomed beaches but was lower on groomed beaches. This was the case even in the off season despite wrack depths returning to similar levels found on ungroomed beaches. These impacts of grooming which extend into the winter offseason where found to be higher on beaches with a lower tidal range. We suggest this is likely to be because in areas with little tidal variation, irregular and unpredictable storm events are likely to be the predominant source of new wrack deposits. Our results suggest it is particularly important that management strategies to mitigate the impacts of grooming are adopted in areas with low tidal range.

Quantifying the effectiveness of shoreline armoring removal on coastal biota of Puget Sound

Lee TS, Toft JD, Cordell JR, Dethier MN, Adams JW, Kelly RP. Quantifying the effectiveness of shoreline armoring removal on coastal biota of Puget Sound. PeerJ [Internet]. 2018 ;6:e4275. Available from: https://peerj.com/articles/4275/
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Shoreline armoring is prevalent around the world with unprecedented human population growth and urbanization along coastal habitats. Armoring structures, such as riprap and bulkheads, that are built to prevent beach erosion and protect coastal infrastructure from storms and flooding can cause deterioration of habitats for migratory fish species, disrupt aquatic–terrestrial connectivity, and reduce overall coastal ecosystem health. Relative to armored shorelines, natural shorelines retain valuable habitats for macroinvertebrates and other coastal biota. One question is whether the impacts of armoring are reversible, allowing restoration via armoring removal and related actions of sediment nourishment and replanting of native riparian vegetation. Armoring removal is targeted as a viable option for restoring some habitat functions, but few assessments of coastal biota response exist. Here, we use opportunistic sampling of pre- and post-restoration data for five biotic measures (wrack % cover, saltmarsh % cover, number of logs, and macroinvertebrate abundance and richness) from a set of six restored sites in Puget Sound, WA, USA. This broad suite of ecosystem metrics responded strongly and positively to armor removal, and these results were evident after less than one year. Restoration responses remained positive and statistically significant across different shoreline elevations and temporal trajectories. This analysis shows that removing shoreline armoring is effective for restoration projects aimed at improving the health and productivity of coastal ecosystems, and these results may be widely applicable.

Anthropogenic disturbance homogenizes seagrass fish communities

Iacarella JC, Adamczyk E, Bowen D, Chalifour L, Eger A, Heath W, Helms S, Hessing-Lewis M, Hunt BPV, MacInnis A, et al. Anthropogenic disturbance homogenizes seagrass fish communities. Global Change Biology [Internet]. 2018 . Available from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/gcb.14090/abstract?systemMessage=Wiley+Online+Library+is+migrating+to+a+new+platform+powered+by+Atypon%2C+the+leading+provider+of+scholarly+publishing+platforms.+The+new+Wiley+Online+Library+will+be+migrated+over
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $38.00
Type: Journal Article

Anthropogenic activities have led to the biotic homogenization of many ecological communities, yet in coastal systems this phenomenon remains understudied. In particular, activities that locally affect marine habitat-forming foundation species may perturb habitat and promote species with generalist, opportunistic traits, in turn affecting spatial patterns of biodiversity. Here, we quantified fish diversity in seagrass communities across 89 sites spanning 6° latitude along the Pacific coast of Canada, to test the hypothesis that anthropogenic disturbances homogenize (i.e., lower beta-diversity) assemblages within coastal ecosystems. We test for patterns of biotic homogenization at sites within different anthropogenic disturbance categories (low, medium, high) at two spatial scales (within and across regions) using both abundance- and incidence-based beta-diversity metrics. Our models provide clear evidence that fish communities in high anthropogenic disturbance seagrass areas are homogenized relative to those in low disturbance areas. These results were consistent across within-region comparisons using abundance- and incidence-based measures of beta-diversity, and in across-region comparisons using incidence-based measures. Physical and biotic characteristics of seagrass meadows also influenced fish beta-diversity. Biotic habitat characteristics including seagrass biomass and shoot density were more differentiated amongst high disturbance sites, potentially indicative of a perturbed environment. Indicator species and trait analyses revealed fishes associated with low disturbance sites had characteristics including stenotopy, lower swimming ability, and egg guarding behaviour. Our study is the first to show biotic homogenization of fishes across seagrass meadows within areas of relatively high human impact. These results support the importance of targeting conservation efforts in low anthropogenic disturbance areas across land- and seascapes, as well as managing anthropogenic impacts in high activity areas.

Altered fish community and feeding behaviour in close proximity to boat moorings in an urban estuary

Lanham BS, Vergés A, Hedge LH, Johnston EL, Poore AGB. Altered fish community and feeding behaviour in close proximity to boat moorings in an urban estuary. Marine Pollution Bulletin [Internet]. 2018 ;129(1):43 - 51. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025326X18300912
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Coastal urbanization has led to large-scale transformation of estuaries, with artificial structures now commonplace. Boat moorings are known to reduce seagrass cover, but little is known about their effect on fish communities. We used underwater video to quantify abundance, diversity, composition and feeding behaviour of fish assemblages on two scales: with increasing distance from moorings on fine scales, and among locations where moorings were present or absent. Fish were less abundant in close proximity to boat moorings, and the species composition varied on fine scales, leading to lower predation pressure near moorings. There was no relationship at the location with seagrass. On larger scales, we detected no differences in abundance or community composition among locations where moorings were present or absent. These findings show a clear impact of moorings on fish and highlight the importance of fine-scale assessments over location-scale comparisons in the detection of the effects of artificial structures.

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