Human Impacts on the Environment

There is no Planet B: A healthy Earth requires greater parity between space and marine research

Elliott M. There is no Planet B: A healthy Earth requires greater parity between space and marine research. Marine Pollution Bulletin [Internet]. 2018 ;130:28-30. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025326X18301607
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $55.20
Type: Journal Article

Exploring our planetary boundaries (i.e. the safe operating space for humanity) has demonstrated that we have already exceeded three of the 10 defined variables which support our wellbeing: the rate of biodiversity loss, the biogeochemical fluxes of nitrogen and climate change (Rockström et al., 2009Steffen et al., 2015). Recently more than 15,000 international scientists have warned that humanity was exceeding the limits of the planet (Ripple et al., 2017). Similarly, in marine ecosystems, biogeochemical fluxes and biosphere integrity exceed their safe boundaries (Nash et al., 2017). Despite the uncertainties and criticisms of the methodologies applied (Montoya et al., 2018), those authors agree that “it would be unwise to drive the Earth System substantially away from a Holocene-like condition. A continuing trajectory away from the Holocene could lead, with an uncomfortably high probability, to a very different state of the Earth System, one that is likely to be much less hospitable to the development of human societies” ( Steffen et al., 2015).

Tidal range and recovery from the impacts mechanical beach grooming

Griffin C, Day N, Rosenquist H, Wellenreuther M, Bunnefeld N, Gilburn AS. Tidal range and recovery from the impacts mechanical beach grooming. Ocean & Coastal Management [Internet]. 2018 ;154:66 - 71. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0964569117307056
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

Mechanical grooming to remove litter and wrack from sandy beaches reduces strandline biodiversity. The impact of tidal range on recovery rates of strandline ecosystems after grooming has not been examined to date, even though tidal range is known to affect the spatial and temporal patterns of seaweed. We compared taxon richness of macroinvertebrates that occur all year round at 104 sites on two coastlines at similar latitudes in Northern Europe that have pronounced differences in tidal range. Macroinvertebrate taxon richness was positively correlated with algae depth on both groomed and ungroomed beaches but was lower on groomed beaches. This was the case even in the off season despite wrack depths returning to similar levels found on ungroomed beaches. These impacts of grooming which extend into the winter offseason where found to be higher on beaches with a lower tidal range. We suggest this is likely to be because in areas with little tidal variation, irregular and unpredictable storm events are likely to be the predominant source of new wrack deposits. Our results suggest it is particularly important that management strategies to mitigate the impacts of grooming are adopted in areas with low tidal range.

Quantifying the effectiveness of shoreline armoring removal on coastal biota of Puget Sound

Lee TS, Toft JD, Cordell JR, Dethier MN, Adams JW, Kelly RP. Quantifying the effectiveness of shoreline armoring removal on coastal biota of Puget Sound. PeerJ [Internet]. 2018 ;6:e4275. Available from: https://peerj.com/articles/4275/
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Shoreline armoring is prevalent around the world with unprecedented human population growth and urbanization along coastal habitats. Armoring structures, such as riprap and bulkheads, that are built to prevent beach erosion and protect coastal infrastructure from storms and flooding can cause deterioration of habitats for migratory fish species, disrupt aquatic–terrestrial connectivity, and reduce overall coastal ecosystem health. Relative to armored shorelines, natural shorelines retain valuable habitats for macroinvertebrates and other coastal biota. One question is whether the impacts of armoring are reversible, allowing restoration via armoring removal and related actions of sediment nourishment and replanting of native riparian vegetation. Armoring removal is targeted as a viable option for restoring some habitat functions, but few assessments of coastal biota response exist. Here, we use opportunistic sampling of pre- and post-restoration data for five biotic measures (wrack % cover, saltmarsh % cover, number of logs, and macroinvertebrate abundance and richness) from a set of six restored sites in Puget Sound, WA, USA. This broad suite of ecosystem metrics responded strongly and positively to armor removal, and these results were evident after less than one year. Restoration responses remained positive and statistically significant across different shoreline elevations and temporal trajectories. This analysis shows that removing shoreline armoring is effective for restoration projects aimed at improving the health and productivity of coastal ecosystems, and these results may be widely applicable.

Anthropogenic disturbance homogenizes seagrass fish communities

Iacarella JC, Adamczyk E, Bowen D, Chalifour L, Eger A, Heath W, Helms S, Hessing-Lewis M, Hunt BPV, MacInnis A, et al. Anthropogenic disturbance homogenizes seagrass fish communities. Global Change Biology [Internet]. 2018 . Available from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/gcb.14090/abstract?systemMessage=Wiley+Online+Library+is+migrating+to+a+new+platform+powered+by+Atypon%2C+the+leading+provider+of+scholarly+publishing+platforms.+The+new+Wiley+Online+Library+will+be+migrated+over
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $38.00
Type: Journal Article

Anthropogenic activities have led to the biotic homogenization of many ecological communities, yet in coastal systems this phenomenon remains understudied. In particular, activities that locally affect marine habitat-forming foundation species may perturb habitat and promote species with generalist, opportunistic traits, in turn affecting spatial patterns of biodiversity. Here, we quantified fish diversity in seagrass communities across 89 sites spanning 6° latitude along the Pacific coast of Canada, to test the hypothesis that anthropogenic disturbances homogenize (i.e., lower beta-diversity) assemblages within coastal ecosystems. We test for patterns of biotic homogenization at sites within different anthropogenic disturbance categories (low, medium, high) at two spatial scales (within and across regions) using both abundance- and incidence-based beta-diversity metrics. Our models provide clear evidence that fish communities in high anthropogenic disturbance seagrass areas are homogenized relative to those in low disturbance areas. These results were consistent across within-region comparisons using abundance- and incidence-based measures of beta-diversity, and in across-region comparisons using incidence-based measures. Physical and biotic characteristics of seagrass meadows also influenced fish beta-diversity. Biotic habitat characteristics including seagrass biomass and shoot density were more differentiated amongst high disturbance sites, potentially indicative of a perturbed environment. Indicator species and trait analyses revealed fishes associated with low disturbance sites had characteristics including stenotopy, lower swimming ability, and egg guarding behaviour. Our study is the first to show biotic homogenization of fishes across seagrass meadows within areas of relatively high human impact. These results support the importance of targeting conservation efforts in low anthropogenic disturbance areas across land- and seascapes, as well as managing anthropogenic impacts in high activity areas.

Altered fish community and feeding behaviour in close proximity to boat moorings in an urban estuary

Lanham BS, Vergés A, Hedge LH, Johnston EL, Poore AGB. Altered fish community and feeding behaviour in close proximity to boat moorings in an urban estuary. Marine Pollution Bulletin [Internet]. 2018 ;129(1):43 - 51. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025326X18300912
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Coastal urbanization has led to large-scale transformation of estuaries, with artificial structures now commonplace. Boat moorings are known to reduce seagrass cover, but little is known about their effect on fish communities. We used underwater video to quantify abundance, diversity, composition and feeding behaviour of fish assemblages on two scales: with increasing distance from moorings on fine scales, and among locations where moorings were present or absent. Fish were less abundant in close proximity to boat moorings, and the species composition varied on fine scales, leading to lower predation pressure near moorings. There was no relationship at the location with seagrass. On larger scales, we detected no differences in abundance or community composition among locations where moorings were present or absent. These findings show a clear impact of moorings on fish and highlight the importance of fine-scale assessments over location-scale comparisons in the detection of the effects of artificial structures.

Optimizing oil spill cleanup efforts: A tactical approach and evaluation framework

Grubesic TH, Wei R, Nelson J. Optimizing oil spill cleanup efforts: A tactical approach and evaluation framework. Marine Pollution Bulletin [Internet]. 2017 ;125(1-2):318 - 329. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025326X17307464
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Although anthropogenic oil spills vary in size, duration and severity, their broad impacts on complex social, economic and ecological systems can be significant. Questions pertaining to the operational challenges associated with the tactical allocation of human resources, cleanup equipment and supplies to areas impacted by a large spill are particularly salient when developing mitigation strategies for extreme oiling events. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the application of advanced oil spill modeling techniques in combination with a developed mathematical model to spatially optimize the allocation of response crews and equipment for cleaning up an offshore oil spill. The results suggest that the detailed simulations and optimization model are a good first step in allowing both communities and emergency responders to proactively plan for extreme oiling events and develop response strategies that minimize the impacts of spills.

Boat anchoring pressure on coastal seabed: Quantification and bias estimation using AIS data

Deter J, Lozupone X, Inacio A, Boissery P, Holon F. Boat anchoring pressure on coastal seabed: Quantification and bias estimation using AIS data. Marine Pollution Bulletin [Internet]. 2017 ;123(1-2):175 - 181. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025326X17307282
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Global shipping is economically important, but has many adverse environmental effects. Anchoring contributes greatly to this adverse impact, as it is responsible for mechanical disturbance of highly sensitive marine habitats. Recovery of these ecosystems is limited by slow regrowth. Anchoring pressure on coastal seabed habitats was estimated using AIS (Automatic Identification System) data along 1800 km of Mediterranean coastline between 2010 and 2015. A comparison with field observations showed that these results were most consistent for large boats (> 50 m). An analysis of AIS data coupled with a seabed map showed that around 30% of the habitats between 0 and − 80 m exhibited anchoring pressure. Posidonia oceanica seagrass beds were the most impacted habitat in terms of duration. This methodology efficiently estimates spatial and temporal anchoring pressure principally due to large boats and should interest managers of marine protected areas as much as coastline managers.

Potential impacts of offshore oil spills on polar bears in the Chukchi Sea

Wilson RR, Perham C, French-McCay DP, Balouskus R. Potential impacts of offshore oil spills on polar bears in the Chukchi Sea. Environmental Pollution [Internet]. 2018 ;235:652 - 659. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0269749117345931
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

Sea ice decline is anticipated to increase human access to the Arctic Ocean allowing for offshore oil and gas development in once inaccessible areas. Given the potential negative consequences of an oil spill on marine wildlife populations in the Arctic, it is important to understand the magnitude of impact a large spill could have on wildlife to inform response planning efforts. In this study we simulated oil spills that released 25,000 barrels of oil for 30 days in autumn originating from two sites in the Chukchi Sea (one in Russia and one in the U.S.) and tracked the distribution of oil for 76 days. We then determined the potential impact such a spill might have on polar bears (Ursus maritimus) and their habitat by overlapping spills with maps of polar bear habitat and movement trajectories. Only a small proportion (1–10%) of high-value polar bear sea ice habitat was directly affected by oil sufficient to impact bears. However, 27–38% of polar bears in the region were potentially exposed to oil. Oil consistently had the highest probability of reaching Wrangel and Herald islands, important areas of denning and summer terrestrial habitat. Oil did not reach polar bears until approximately 3 weeks after the spills. Our study found the potential for significant impacts to polar bears under a worst case discharge scenario, but suggests that there is a window of time where effective containment efforts could minimize exposure to bears. Our study provides a framework for wildlife managers and planners to assess the level of response that would be required to treat exposed wildlife and where spill response equipment might be best stationed. While the size of spill we simulated has a low probability of occurring, it provides an upper limit for planners to consider when crafting response plans.

Impacts of Coastal Land Use and Shoreline Armoring on Estuarine Ecosystems: an Introduction to a Special Issue

Prosser DJ, Jordan TE, Nagel JL, Seitz RD, Weller DE, Whigham DF. Impacts of Coastal Land Use and Shoreline Armoring on Estuarine Ecosystems: an Introduction to a Special Issue. Estuaries and Coasts [Internet]. 2017 . Available from: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12237-017-0331-1
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

The nearshore land-water interface is an important ecological zone that faces anthropogenic pressure from development in coastal regions throughout the world. Coastal waters and estuaries like Chesapeake Bay receive and process land discharges loaded with anthropogenic nutrients and other pollutants that cause eutrophication, hypoxia, and other damage to shallow-water ecosystems. In addition, shorelines are increasingly armored with bulkhead (seawall), riprap, and other structures to protect human infrastructure against the threats of sea-level rise, storm surge, and erosion. Armoring can further influence estuarine and nearshore marine ecosystem functions by degrading water quality, spreading invasive species, and destroying ecologically valuable habitat. These detrimental effects on ecosystem function have ramifications for ecologically and economically important flora and fauna. This special issue of Estuaries and Coasts explores the interacting effects of coastal land use and shoreline armoring on estuarine and coastal marine ecosystems. The majority of papers focus on the Chesapeake Bay region, USA, where 50 major tributaries and an extensive watershed (~ 167,000 km2), provide an ideal model to examine the impacts of human activities at scales ranging from the local shoreline to the entire watershed. The papers consider the influence of watershed land use and natural versus armored shorelines on ecosystem properties and processes as well as on key natural resources.

Reduction of sea turtle population recruitment caused by nightlight: Evidence from the Mediterranean region

Dimitriadis C, Fournari-Konstantinidou I, Sourbès L, Koutsoubas D, Mazaris AD. Reduction of sea turtle population recruitment caused by nightlight: Evidence from the Mediterranean region. Ocean & Coastal Management [Internet]. 2018 ;153:108 - 115. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0964569117306300
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

The spread of artificial night lighting is increasingly acknowledged as a major threat to global biodiversity. Identifying and exploring the impacts of nightlight pollution upon species behavior, ecology and population dynamics could enhance conservation capacity. Sea turtle hatchlings emerge from nest at night and use visual cues to direct towards the brightest and lowest horizon, eventually leading them to the sea. Nightlight pollution could alter the cues perceived, disorienting the fragile hatchlings. We examined the level of artificial lighting and orientation patterns of sea turtles hatchling, in Zakynthos Island, Greece, one of the main nesting rookeries of the loggerheads (Caretta caretta) in the Mediterranean Sea. We analyzed movement patterns of 5967 hatchlings from 230 nests, and demonstrate that nightlight pollution could reduce population recruitment by more than 7%, suggesting that mitigation measures should become a high conservation priority. Our results further suggest that the responses of sea turtle hatchlings to artificial nighttime lighting could vary significantly depending on various factors, either anthropogenic or natural. Local conditions operating at the nesting site level determine the fine scale responses of hatchlings, thus conservation measures should be drawn in respect to site-specific properties.

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