Natural Sciences

Variability and sustainability of the Southern Subarea of the Caribbean Sea large marine ecosystem

G. EYVillami, Cervigón F. Variability and sustainability of the Southern Subarea of the Caribbean Sea large marine ecosystem. Environmental Development [Internet]. 2017 . Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2211464516302561
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $31.50
Type: Journal Article

The southern subarea of the Caribbean Sea Large Marine Ecosystem encompasses most of the continental and island coasts of Venezuela, as well as Trinidad, Tobago, Bonaire, Curacao, Aruba and the northeastern continental coast of Colombia in the Caribbean. The subarea is the only area of the Caribbean Sea LME (CSLME) with an important upwelling process that determines its very high productivity, especially in the eastern region of Venezuela. It generates a big impact over the ecological conditions of the rest of the Caribbean Sea LME, mainly over the biological productivity. However, extreme changes of climatic conditions have weakened upwelling in several years during the last two decades, with severe consequences in the total fish production of Venezuela and the southern subarea of the Caribbean Sea Large Marine Ecosystem. The crisis of the sardine in Venezuela is perhaps the clearest example of it. Another contribution of the southern subarea of the Caribbean Sea LME is the high biodiversity of marine fauna and flora that appears in numerous coral reefs, seagrass meadows and mangroves in the region. Unfortunately, several factors threaten the health and population sizes of some taxonomic groups. The corals are among the most affected, with losses of significant live coral coverage at all the reefs of the southern subarea, similar to the rest of the Caribbean region. Even when the governance of the southern subarea of the Caribbean Sea LME has many environmental laws and institutions that are charged with applying these laws, the latter are not appropriately enforced. If this situation does not change, the sustainability of the southern subarea will be at risk.

Copper in the sediment: a major stressor for eelgrass, Zostera marina L.

Nielsen SLaurentius, Banta GT, Khan FR, Palmqvist A. Copper in the sediment: a major stressor for eelgrass, Zostera marina L. Hydrobiologia [Internet]. 2017 ;788(1):143 - 155. Available from: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10750-016-2994-1
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) is an important organism in coastal marine waters and is highly likely to encounter exposure to multiple stressors, both anthropogenic contaminants and natural stressors. Here, we exposed eelgrass to a range of Cu concentrations and salinities, and also varied exposure route between sediment and water. Measured endpoints were Cu accumulation in root and leaves, relative growth rate, leaf mortality, chlorophyll concentration, and maximum photosynthetic quantum yield. Cu accumulation from the sediment was translocated to all parts of the plant, while Cu taken up from the water showed a tendency to remain in leaves. Effects on relative growth rate and leaf mortality were found only following uptake of Cu from the sediment. We tested effects of different salinities, acting as multiple stressors, together with Cu, but found only weak effects with little interaction with Cu. Experiments with anthropogenic contaminants that marine plants are mainly exposed to through the sediment should be done using sediment exposure, as the common practice of using only water exposure will lead to underestimation of harmful effects. Future studies should take all relevant factors into consideration, as anthropogenic inputs and natural factors are prone to fluctuations due to e.g., climate change.

Natural recovery of Zostera noltii seagrass beds and benthic nematode assemblage responses to physical disturbance caused by traditional harvesting activities

Branco J, Pedro S, Alves AS, Ribeiro C, Materatski P, Pires R, Caçador I, Adão H. Natural recovery of Zostera noltii seagrass beds and benthic nematode assemblage responses to physical disturbance caused by traditional harvesting activities. Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology [Internet]. 2017 . Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022098117301417
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

In the intertidal seagrass beds of Zostera noltii of Mira estuary (SW, Portugal) the harvesting practices are frequent. The traditional bivalve harvesting not only affects the target species as the remaining biological assemblages. The main aim of this study was to assess the disturbance caused by sediment digging in the recovery of the seagrass beds habitat, through an experimental fieldwork. The responses of the seagrass plant condition, the sediment microbial activity and the nematode assemblages were investigated after the digging activity in seagrass beds. A total of four experimental plots were randomly demarcated in situ, two plots were subjected to the disturbance - “Digging” - while other two were “Control”; the sampling occurred in five occasions, from May to October: T0–before digging; T1–14 days after digging; T2–45 days; T3–75 days; and T4–175 days. The environmental variables measured in the sediment and the photosynthetic efficiency (α) of the Z. noltii plants in each plot and sampling occasion registered similar values, throughout the experiment. The extracellular enzymatic activity (EEA) clearly presented a temporal pattern, although no significant differences were obtained between digging and control plots. Nematode assemblages registered high densities, revealing the absence of the digging effect: control plots maintained similar density and diversity throughout the experiment, while the density and diversity between digging plots was significantly different at T0 and T4; the trophic composition was similar for both control and digging plots, characterized mainly by non-selective deposit feeders (1B) and epigrowth feeders (2A).Organic matter, nitrate and mean grain size explain a significant amount of the variation in the nematode genera composition. This study demonstrated the capacity of the seagrass habitat to recover under low intensity physical disturbance associated to harvesting.

International collaboration and comparative research on ocean top predators under CLIOTOP

Hobday AJ, Arrizabalaga H, Evans K, Scale KL, Senina I, Weng KC. International collaboration and comparative research on ocean top predators under CLIOTOP. Deep Sea Research Part II: Topical Studies in Oceanography [Internet]. 2017 . Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S096706451730067X
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Oceanic top predators have ecological, social and economic value of global significance. These wide-ranging marine species, which include sharks, tunas and billfishes, marine mammals, turtles and seabirds, are the focus of international research attention under the Climate Impacts on Oceanic Top Predators (CLIOTOP) science programme, one of the Integrated Marine Biosphere Research (IMBeR) projects. Over more than a decade, research conducted under CLIOTOP has involved scientists from more than 30 countries, with international collaboration increasing markedly over time, and comparative analyses resulting in new knowledge and understanding of oceanic top predators. This special issue presents 27 papers arising from the 3rd CLIOTOP symposium, held in San Sebastián, Spain in September 2015, spanning topics such as conservation biology, trophic ecology, fisheries science, climate change, and adaptive management. The maturation and synthesis of CLIOTOP's collaborative research is now resulting in real-world management applications and improving understanding of potential ecological and socio-economic impacts of climate change in oceanic systems. The ultimate CLIOTOP goal of preparing both climate-sensitive predator populations and the human societies dependent on them for the impending impacts of climate change is now within reach.

Wave Exposure Structures Oyster Distribution on Natural Intertidal Reefs, But Not on Hardened Shorelines

Theuerkauf SJ, Eggleston DB, Puckett BJ, Theuerkauf KW. Wave Exposure Structures Oyster Distribution on Natural Intertidal Reefs, But Not on Hardened Shorelines. Estuaries and Coasts [Internet]. 2017 ;40(2):376 - 386. Available from: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12237-016-0153-6
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Intertidal oyster reefs can protect estuarine shorelines from wave erosion and sea-level rise, and recognition of these ecosystem services has fueled global efforts to conserve and restore these reefs. Although intertidal oyster reefs are valued for attenuating wave erosion, little attention has been paid to the effects of wave exposure on their distribution. The present study characterized the role of wave exposure in determining the distribution of natural intertidal oyster reefs and of oysters on hardened shorelines (bulkhead and riprap revetments). Wave exposure was determined using the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)-developed Wave Exposure Model (WEMo), which integrates adjacent water depth, fetch, and processed wind information, among other variables. Field mapping of oyster reefs, defined as ≥10 oysters m−2, in Pamlico and Core sounds, North Carolina, USA, was conducted in summer 2014. Hardened shorelines and associated oyster densities were mapped for Pamlico Sound only. A narrow wave exposure threshold (~500 J m−1) was identified above which natural intertidal reefs did not occur and below which reef presence was apparently dependent on other structuring variables, such as salinity at the time of sampling and the grain size of surrounding sediments. Wave exposure was not correlated with the presence of oysters on hardened shorelines. The application of WEMo in the present study should be useful for selecting locations and materials for intertidal oyster reef restoration.

The role of seagrass meadows, mangrove forests, salt marshes and reed beds as nursery areas and food sources for fishes in estuaries

Whitfield AK. The role of seagrass meadows, mangrove forests, salt marshes and reed beds as nursery areas and food sources for fishes in estuaries. Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries [Internet]. 2017 ;27(1):75 - 110. Available from: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11160-016-9454-x
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Each year millions of larval and 0+ juvenile fishes are recruited into estuarine fish populations around the world. For several decades the roles of littoral aquatic and emergent macrophyte habitats as nursery areas for many of these species have been studied and debated at length. This review attempts to collate the published literature and provide a synopsis of the varying, and sometimes conflicting, views on this topic. A large number of studies have shown that a range of species and an abundance of juvenile fishes are associated with littoral macrophytes in estuaries, some of which are found almost exclusively within particular plant habitats. Other studies have shown the movement of certain juvenile fishes from one type of littoral plant habitat to another as they grow and develop new feeding strategies and dietary requirements. Overall, it would appear that seagrass beds and mangrove forests are particularly favoured by fishes as nursery areas in both estuaries and the nearshore marine environment, and that the loss of these habitats leads to a decline in juvenile fish diversity and abundance. Salt marshes and reed beds generally have a lower diversity of fishes than seagrass and mangrove habitats, possibly due to the more temperate location of salt marshes and the dense structure of some reed beds. Stable isotope studies in particular are providing increasing evidence that carbon assimilated by juvenile fishes in mangrove, marsh and reed habitats is not primarily derived from these macrophytes but comprises a mixture of these sources and a diverse range of macro- and microalgae, particularly epiphytic, epipsammic, epipelic and epilithic diatoms and algae found in these areas. The closest trophic link between the macrophyte food chain and associated fishes occurs in seagrass habitats where a significant portion of the overall macrophyte leaf biomass often consists of epiphytic algae and diatoms. Structurally, mangrove forests, salt marshes and reed beds provide more substantial and complex habitats for juvenile fish refuge, but some of these habitats are constrained with regard to nursery provision by being fully exposed at low tide. Under such circumstances the small fish are sometimes forced into creeks and channels where larger piscivorous fishes are often present. Overall, in terms of a broad ranking of the four habitats as potential fish nursery areas, seagrass meadows are ranked first, followed by mangrove forests, salt marshes and then reed beds. This ranking does not imply that the lower ranked habitats are unimportant, since these plants perform a myriad of ecosystem services that are not related to the provision of fish nursery areas, e.g. bank stabilization. It is also emphasized that the protection of specific plant species should not be encouraged because it is important to have an ecosystem approach to conservation so that the diversity of habitats and their connectivity for fishes is maintained.

Phytoplankton can actively diversify their migration strategy in response to turbulent cues

Sengupta A, Carrara F, Stocker R. Phytoplankton can actively diversify their migration strategy in response to turbulent cues. Nature [Internet]. 2017 . Available from: http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nature21415.html
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $32.00
Type: Journal Article

Marine phytoplankton inhabit a dynamic environment where turbulence, together with nutrient and light availability, shapes species fitness, succession and selection12. Many species of phytoplankton are motile and undertake diel vertical migrations to gain access to nutrient-rich deeper layers at night and well-lit surface waters during the day34. Disruption of this migratory strategy by turbulence is considered to be an important cause of the succession between motile and non-motile species when conditions turn turbulent156. However, this classical view neglects the possibility that motile species may actively respond to turbulent cues to avoid layers of strong turbulence7. Here we report that phytoplankton, including raphidophytes and dinoflagellates, can actively diversify their migratory strategy in response to hydrodynamic cues characteristic of overturning by Kolmogorov-scale eddies. Upon experiencing repeated overturning with timescales and statistics representative of ocean turbulence, an upward-swimming population rapidly (5–60 min) splits into two subpopulations, one swimming upward and one swimming downward. Quantitative morphological analysis of the harmful-algal-bloom-forming raphidophyte Heterosigma akashiwo together with a model of cell mechanics revealed that this behaviour was accompanied by a modulation of the cells’ fore–aft asymmetry. The minute magnitude of the required modulation, sufficient to invert the preferential swimming direction of the cells, highlights the advanced level of control that phytoplankton can exert on their migratory behaviour. Together with observations of enhanced cellular stress after overturning and the typically deleterious effects of strong turbulence on motile phytoplankton58, these results point to an active adaptation of H. akashiwo to increase the chance of evading turbulent layers by diversifying the direction of migration within the population, in a manner suggestive of evolutionary bet-hedging. This migratory behaviour relaxes the boundaries between the fluid dynamic niches of motile and non-motile phytoplankton, and highlights that rapid responses to hydrodynamic cues are important survival strategies for phytoplankton in the ocean.

Mercury in Feathers and Blood of Gulls from the Southern Baltic Coast, Poland

Szumiło-Pilarska E, Falkowska L, Grajewska A, Meissner W. Mercury in Feathers and Blood of Gulls from the Southern Baltic Coast, Poland. Water, Air, & Soil Pollution [Internet]. 2017 ;228(4). Available from: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11270-017-3308-6
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Gulls were assessed as sentinels of contamination in the coastal zone of the Southern Baltic, research material being obtained from dead birds collected on Polish beaches and near fishing ports in 2009–2012. In feathers and blood of four gull species: herring gull (Larus argentatus), common gull (Larus canus), black-headed gull (Chroicocephalus ridibundus), and great black-backed gull (Larus marinus), concentration of total mercury (HgT) was assayed, taking into account the type of feathers, sex, and age. Stable isotopes (δ15N, δ13C) were used as tracers of trophic position in the food web. In the study, feathers and blood were compared as non-invasive indicators of alimentary exposure introducing mercury into the system. In order to do that, the correlations between mercury concentrations in the blood, feathers, and the birds’ internal tissues were examined. The strongest relations were observed in the liver for each species R2Common Gull = 0.94, p = 0.001; R2Black-headed Gull = 0.89, p = 0.001; R2Great Black-backed Gull = 0.53, p = 0.001; R2Herring Gull = 0.78, p = 0.001. While no correlation was found with feathers, only developing feathers of juvenile herring gulls were found to be a good indicator immediate of exposure through food (R2muscle = 0.71, p = 0.001; R2kidneys = 0.73, p = 0.001; R2heart = 0.89, p = 0.001; R2lungs = 0.86, p = 0.001; R2brain = 0.83, p = 0.001). Additionally, based on studies of herring gull primary feathers, decrease of mercury concentration in the diet of birds over the last two decades is also discussed.

Microbial community assembly and evolution in subseafloor sediment

Starnawski P, Bataillon T, Ettema TJG, Jochum LM, Schreiber L, Chen X, Lever MA, Polz MF, Jørgensen BB, Schramm A, et al. Microbial community assembly and evolution in subseafloor sediment. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences [Internet]. 2017 ;114(11):2940 - 2945. Available from: http://www.pnas.org/content/114/11/2940.abstract.html?etoc
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $10.00
Type: Journal Article

Bacterial and archaeal communities inhabiting the subsurface seabed live under strong energy limitation and have growth rates that are orders of magnitude slower than laboratory-grown cultures. It is not understood how subsurface microbial communities are assembled and whether populations undergo adaptive evolution or accumulate mutations as a result of impaired DNA repair under such energy-limited conditions. Here we use amplicon sequencing to explore changes of microbial communities during burial and isolation from the surface to the >5,000-y-old subsurface of marine sediment and identify a small core set of mostly uncultured bacteria and archaea that is present throughout the sediment column. These persisting populations constitute a small fraction of the entire community at the surface but become predominant in the subsurface. We followed patterns of genome diversity with depth in four dominant lineages of the persisting populations by mapping metagenomic sequence reads onto single-cell genomes. Nucleotide sequence diversity was uniformly low and did not change with age and depth of the sediment. Likewise, there was no detectable change in mutation rates and efficacy of selection. Our results indicate that subsurface microbial communities predominantly assemble by selective survival of taxa able to persist under extreme energy limitation.

Effects of ocean acidification on primary production in a coastal North Sea phytoplankton community

Eberlein T, Wohlrab S, Rost B, John U, Bach LT, Riebesell U, Van de Waal DB. Effects of ocean acidification on primary production in a coastal North Sea phytoplankton community. PLOS ONE [Internet]. 2017 ;12(3):e0172594. Available from: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0172594
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

We studied the effect of ocean acidification (OA) on a coastal North Sea plankton community in a long-term mesocosm CO2-enrichment experiment (BIOACID II long-term mesocosm study). From March to July 2013, 10 mesocosms of 19 m length with a volume of 47.5 to 55.9 m3 were deployed in the Gullmar Fjord, Sweden. CO2 concentrations were enriched in five mesocosms to reach average CO2 partial pressures (pCO2) of 760 μatm. The remaining five mesocosms were used as control at ambient pCO2 of 380 μatm. Our paper is part of a PLOS collection on this long-term mesocosm experiment. Here, we here tested the effect of OA on total primary production (PPT) by performing 14C-based bottle incubations for 24 h. Furthermore, photoacclimation was assessed by conducting 14C-based photosynthesis-irradiance response (P/I) curves. Changes in chlorophyll a concentrations over time were reflected in the development of PPT, and showed higher phytoplankton biomass build-up under OA. We observed two subsequent phytoplankton blooms in all mesocosms, with peaks in PPT around day 33 and day 56. OA had no significant effect on PPT, except for a marginal increase during the second phytoplankton bloom when inorganic nutrients were already depleted. Maximum light use efficiencies and light saturation indices calculated from the P/I curves changed simultaneously in all mesocosms, and suggest that OA did not alter phytoplankton photoacclimation. Despite large variability in time-integrated productivity estimates among replicates, our overall results indicate that coastal phytoplankton communities can be affected by OA at certain times of the seasonal succession with potential consequences for ecosystem functioning.

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