Natural Sciences

Seafloor Geomorphology as Benthic Habitat

Harris PT, Baker E. Seafloor Geomorphology as Benthic Habitat. Elsevier; 2020. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/book/9780128149607/seafloor-geomorphology-as-benthic-habitat#book-description
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Book

Seafloor Geomorphology as Benthic Habitat: GeoHab Atlas of Seafloor Geomorphic Features and Benthic Habitats, Second Edition, provides an updated synthesis of seabed geomorphology and benthic habitats. This new edition includes new case studies from all geographic areas and habitats that were not included in the previous edition, including the Arctic, Asia, Africa and South America. Using multibeam sonar, the benthic ecology of submarine features, such as fjords, sand banks, coral reefs, seamounts, canyons, mud volcanoes and spreading ridges is revealed in unprecedented detail. This timely release offers new understanding for researchers in Marine Biodiversity, environmental managers, ecologists, and more.

Two-dimensional modelling of wave dynamics and wave forces on fringing coral reefs

Baldock TE, Shabani B, Callaghan DP, Hu Z, Mumby PJ. Two-dimensional modelling of wave dynamics and wave forces on fringing coral reefs. Coastal Engineering [Internet]. In Press :103594. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0378383919302303
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

Two-dimensional numerical modelling of swell wave dynamics on idealized fringing reefs is performed using SWAN, covering a wide range of bathymetries, climate forcing conditions and water depths over the reefs. The results illustrate the impact of reef geometry and bathymetry, coral species and sea level rise on key hydrodynamic parameters on the reef and on forces on corals. The modelling demonstrates that one-dimensional models underestimate the wave action on the reef flat. Wide short reefs and narrow long reefs have similar wave heights at the centre of the reef flat. For a given reef length, the wave height first decreases with increasing reef width, then increases to a local maximum when reef width is approximately equal to the reef length, and then decreases for further increases in width. This pattern is a result of combined dissipation and refraction processes, which combine to lead to different zones of cross-reef wave transformation. Provided that a reef retains its hydrodynamic functions in breaking and refracting the waves, sea level rise enhances the wave heights and wave orbital velocities on the reef flat. If vertical coral growth does not keep pace with sea level rise, loss of the hydrodynamic functions of the reef may occur on deeper reefs, and result in a reduction of near bed velocities with sea level rise. Hydrodynamic forces on corals vary by coral species and SLR changes the magnitude of the forces on different species in different ways, which may lead to less favourable conditions for certain coral species. For long period swell, the intermediate size corals are drag-dominated and behave similarly to branching corals, whereas for short period swell their behavior is similar to that of the inertia-dominated massive corals. For intermediate corals different responses to SLR may therefore be expected for different overall regional wave climates. Over time, this process may contribute to changes in the structural complexity of reefs. The influence of sea level rise on the forces on corals on the reef flat is different under swell and cyclonic wind conditions since wind influences wave period in the latter case.

The Bottlenose Dolphin Epigenetic Aging Tool (BEAT): A Molecular Age Estimation Tool for Small Cetaceans

Beal AP, Kiszka JJ, Wells RS, Eirin-Lopez JM. The Bottlenose Dolphin Epigenetic Aging Tool (BEAT): A Molecular Age Estimation Tool for Small Cetaceans. Frontiers in Marine Science [Internet]. 2019 ;6. Available from: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2019.00561/full
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Age constitutes a critical parameter for the study of animal populations, providing information about development, environmental effects, survival, and reproduction. Unfortunately, age estimation is not only challenging in large, mobile and legally protected species, but often involves invasive sampling methods. The present work investigates the association between epigenetic modifications and chronological age in small cetaceans. For that purpose, DNA methylation at age-linked genes was characterized in an extensively studied, long-term resident common bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) community from Sarasota Bay (FL, United States) for which sampled individuals have a known age. Results led to the identification of several CpG sites that are significantly correlated to chronological age in this species with the potential for sex to play a role in the modulation of this correlation. These findings have allowed for the development and validation of the “Bottlenose dolphin Epigenetic Age estimation Tool” (BEAT), improving minimally-invasive age estimation in free-ranging small cetaceans. Overall, the BEAT proved to be accurate in estimating age in these organisms. Given its minimally-invasive nature and potential large-scale implementation using skin biopsy samples, this tool can be used to generate age data from free-ranging small cetacean populations.

Observational Needs of Sea Surface Temperature

O’Carroll AG, Armstrong EM, Beggs HM, Bouali M, Casey KS, Corlett GK, Dash P, Donlon CJ, Gentemann CL, Høyer JL, et al. Observational Needs of Sea Surface Temperature. Frontiers in Marine Science [Internet]. 2019 ;6. Available from: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2019.00420/full
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Sea surface temperature (SST) is a fundamental physical variable for understanding, quantifying and predicting complex interactions between the ocean and the atmosphere. Such processes determine how heat from the sun is redistributed across the global oceans, directly impacting large- and small-scale weather and climate patterns. The provision of daily maps of global SST for operational systems, climate modeling and the broader scientific community is now a mature and sustained service coordinated by the Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) and the CEOS SST Virtual Constellation (CEOS SST-VC). Data streams are shared, indexed, processed, quality controlled, analyzed, and documented within a Regional/Global Task Sharing (R/GTS) framework, which is implemented internationally in a distributed manner. Products rely on a combination of low-Earth orbit infrared and microwave satellite imagery, geostationary orbit infrared satellite imagery, and in situ data from moored and drifting buoys, Argo floats, and a suite of independent, fully characterized and traceable in situ measurements for product validation (Fiducial Reference Measurements, FRM). Research and development continues to tackle problems such as instrument calibration, algorithm development, diurnal variability, derivation of high-quality skin and depth temperatures, and areas of specific interest such as the high latitudes and coastal areas. In this white paper, we review progress versus the challenges we set out 10 years ago in a previous paper, highlight remaining and new research and development challenges for the next 10 years (such as the need for sustained continuity of passive microwave SST using a 6.9 GHz channel), and conclude with needs to achieve an integrated global high-resolution SST observing system, with focus on satellite observations exploited in conjunction with in situSSTs. The paper directly relates to the theme of Data Information Systems and also contributes to Ocean Observing Governance and Ocean Technology and Networks within the OceanObs2019 objectives. Applications of SST contribute to all the seven societal benefits, covering Discovery; Ecosystem Health & Biodiversity; Climate Variability & Change; Water, Food, & Energy Security; Pollution & Human Health; Hazards and Maritime Safety; and the Blue Economy.

A meta‐analysis reveals global patterns of sediment effects on marine biodiversity

Magris RA, Ban NC. A meta‐analysis reveals global patterns of sediment effects on marine biodiversity. Global Ecology and Biogeography [Internet]. 2019 . Available from: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/geb.12990
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $42.00
Type: Journal Article

Aim

Sediment disturbances are important threats affecting marine biodiversity, but the variety of biological responses has not yet been synthesized. Here, we collate all available information to compare the extent of impacts across different taxonomic groups, habitat types and pathways of impact (light attenuation, suspended sediment and sedimentation).

Location

Global.

Time period

Data collected from 1979 to 2017.

Major taxa studied

Corals, fishes, seagrasses, sponges, macroalgae, ascidians, bryozoans, crustaceans, echinoderms, molluscs and polychaetes.

Methods

We used meta‐analyses to evaluate the effects of sediments across 842 observations found in 110 publications. We also evaluated some of the biological and methodological factors that could explain the variable effects observed in different studies.

Results

We found a significant negative effect of sediments on behavioural responses of species, reproduction and recruitment processes, the morphology of organisms, physiology, community abundance and diversity, and species interactions. In contrast, the overall effect on the abundance of individual species was statistically non‐significant and there was a strong positive effect on abundance for sponge and polychaete species. Many individual studies described physiological effects on coral reefs, but the effects on the diversity of soft‐bottom and coral reef communities were particularly detrimental. Phototrophic species were generally more negatively impacted by sediments than heterotrophs, driven by strong physiological responses in crustose coralline algae and seagrasses. Additionally, species with limited mobility were more vulnerable to sediment disturbances than highly mobile species. Sedimentation alone triggered more consistently negative effects on most biological responses than light depletion and suspended sediments. We found evidence for increased impacts on community diversity when more than one pathway of impact was present, indicating that these disturbances can disrupt whole ecosystems.

Main conclusions

Our meta‐analysis provided, for the first time, strong quantitative support of negative effects of sediments on marine biodiversity. Taxonomic groups, habitat types and life‐history characteristics were most influential in determining the biological responses to sediment disturbances, highlighting the importance of an ecosystem‐based approach when fully accounting for the impacts of sediments.

Ocean currents predict fine-scale genetic structure and source-sink dynamics in a marine invertebrate coastal fishery

Silva CNS, Macdonald HS, Hadfield MG, Cryer M, Gardner JPA. Ocean currents predict fine-scale genetic structure and source-sink dynamics in a marine invertebrate coastal fishery. ICES Journal of Marine Science [Internet]. 2019 . Available from: https://academic.oup.com/icesjms/article-abstract/76/4/1007/5303700?redirectedFrom=fulltext
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $45.00
Type: Journal Article

Estimates of connectivity are vital for understanding population dynamics and for the design of spatial management areas. However, this is still a major challenge in the marine environment because the relative contributions of factors influencing connectivity amongst subpopulations are difficult to assess. This study combined population genetics with hydrodynamic modelling (Regional Ocean Modeling System, ROMS) to assess spatial and temporal exchange of individuals among subpopulations of the New Zealand scallop, Pecten novaezelandiae, within the Coromandel fishery area open to commercial fishing. Significant genetic differentiation was revealed among subpopulations with variable levels of recruitment. Connectivity, as assessed by ROMS, was a significant explanatory variable of genetic differentiation when accounting for the spatial dependency between locations. Although additional research is needed before source-sink population dynamics can be confidently used in management, these results imply that higher yields could be available from this fishery at lower risk of over-exploitation if the fishing of each subpopulation could be tailored to its contribution to recruitment, perhaps using subpopulation catch limits. This study highlights inter-annual patterns of connectivity, the importance of combining different methods for a better prediction of population dynamics, and how such an approach may contribute to management of living marine resources.

Beyond trophic morphology: stable isotopes reveal ubiquitous versatility in marine turtle trophic ecology

Figgener C, Bernardo J, Plotkin PT. Beyond trophic morphology: stable isotopes reveal ubiquitous versatility in marine turtle trophic ecology. Biological Reviews [Internet]. 2019 . Available from: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/brv.12543
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

The idea that interspecific variation in trophic morphology among closely related species effectively permits resource partitioning has driven research on ecological radiation since Darwin first described variation in beak morphology among Geospiza.

Marine turtles comprise an ecological radiation in which interspecific differences in trophic morphology have similarly been implicated as a pathway to ecopartition the marine realm, in both extant and extinct species. Because marine turtles are charismatic flagship species of conservation concern, their trophic ecology has been studied intensively using stable isotope analyses to gain insights into habitat use and diet, principally to inform conservation management. This legion of studies provides an unparalleled opportunity to examine ecological partitioning across numerous hierarchical levels that heretofore has not been applied to any other ecological radiation. Our contribution aims to provide a quantitative analysis of interspecific variation and a comprehensive review of intraspecific variation in trophic ecology across different hierarchical levels marshalling insights about realised trophic ecology derived from stable isotopes.

We reviewed 113 stable isotope studies, mostly involving single species, and conducted a meta‐analysis of data from adults to elucidate differences in trophic ecology among species. Our study reveals a more intricate hierarchy of ecopartitioning by marine turtles than previously recognised based on trophic morphology and dietary analyses. We found strong statistical support for interspecific partitioning, as well as a continuum of intraspecific trophic sub‐specialisation in most species across several hierarchical levels. This ubiquity of trophic specialisation across many hierarchical levels exposes a far more complex view of trophic ecology and resource‐axis exploitation than suggested by species diversity alone. Not only do species segregate along many widely understood axes such as body size, macrohabitat, and trophic morphology but the general pattern revealed by isotopic studies is one of microhabitat segregation and variation in foraging behaviour within species, within populations, and among individuals.

These findings are highly relevant to conservation management because they imply ecological non‐exchangeability, which introduces a new dimension beyond that of genetic stocks which drives current conservation planning.

Perhaps the most remarkable finding from our data synthesis is that four of six marine turtle species forage across several trophic levels. This pattern is unlike that seen in other large marine predators, which forage at a single trophic level according to stable isotopes. This finding affirms suggestions that marine turtles are robust sentinels of ocean health and likely stabilise marine food webs. This insight has broader significance for studies of marine food webs and trophic ecology of large marine predators.

Beyond insights concerning marine turtle ecology and conservation, our findings also have broader implications for the study of ecological radiations. Particularly, the unrecognised complexity of ecopartitioning beyond that predicted by trophic morphology suggests that this dominant approach in adaptive radiation research likely underestimates the degree of resource overlap and that interspecific disparities in trophic morphology may often over‐predict the degree of realised ecopartitioning. Hence, our findings suggest that stable isotopes can profitably be applied to study other ecological radiations and may reveal trophic variation beyond that reflected by trophic morphology.

ROV Observations on Reproduction by Deep-Sea Cephalopods in the Central Pacific Ocean

Vecchione M. ROV Observations on Reproduction by Deep-Sea Cephalopods in the Central Pacific Ocean. Frontiers in Marine Science [Internet]. 2019 ;6. Available from: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2019.00403/full
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Telepresence-enabled operations by remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) allow many researchers a unique perspective on morphology, behavior, and small-scale distributions of deep-sea animals. I present some examples of cephalopod natural history from recent ROV dives in the central Pacific Ocean. These examples include clues to reproductive behavior of deep-sea squids and cirrate “dumbo” octopods. During March 7–12, 2017, the ROV Deep Discoverer (D2) operating from NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer recorded high-definition video of several squid in the genus Chiroteuthis. These included a mature male, a mature female, and a moribund squid identifiable as C. picteti. The female had obviously mated, with spermatangia implanted in many locations, and was holding in its arms another squid that appeared to be another Chiroteuthis. Considered together, these observations may indicate a deep-sea spawning aggregation and, possibly, sexual cannibalism. Another series of observations by D2 revealed eggs of cirrate octopods attached to octocorals. The remarkable thing about these observations was that in two of them (March 18 and May 4) the egg chorion had swollen and burst the external egg capsule. This may explain how the hatching embryo is able to escape from the tough protective coating secreted by the oviducal gland of cirrates but not secreted by the better-known incirrate octopods.

Integrated Observations of Global Surface Winds, Currents, and Waves: Requirements and Challenges for the Next Decade

Bôas ABVillas, Ardhuin F, Ayet A, Bourassa MA, Brandt P, Chapron B, Cornuelle BD, Farrar JT, Fewings MR, Fox-Kemper B, et al. Integrated Observations of Global Surface Winds, Currents, and Waves: Requirements and Challenges for the Next Decade. Frontiers in Marine Science [Internet]. 2019 ;6. Available from: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2019.00425/full
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Ocean surface winds, currents, and waves play a crucial role in exchanges of momentum, energy, heat, freshwater, gases, and other tracers between the ocean, atmosphere, and ice. Despite surface waves being strongly coupled to the upper ocean circulation and the overlying atmosphere, efforts to improve ocean, atmospheric, and wave observations and models have evolved somewhat independently. From an observational point of view, community efforts to bridge this gap have led to proposals for satellite Doppler oceanography mission concepts, which could provide unprecedented measurements of absolute surface velocity and directional wave spectrum at global scales. This paper reviews the present state of observations of surface winds, currents, and waves, and it outlines observational gaps that limit our current understanding of coupled processes that happen at the air-sea-ice interface. A significant challenge for the coming decade of wind, current, and wave observations will come in combining and interpreting measurements from (a) wave-buoys and high-frequency radars in coastal regions, (b) surface drifters and wave-enabled drifters in the open-ocean, marginal ice zones, and wave-current interaction “hot-spots,” and (c) simultaneous measurements of absolute surface currents, ocean surface wind vector, and directional wave spectrum from Doppler satellite sensors.

How do ocean warm anomalies favor the aggregation of deep convective clouds?

Shamekh S, Muller C, Duvel J-P, D’Andrea F. How do ocean warm anomalies favor the aggregation of deep convective clouds?. Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences [Internet]. 2019 . Available from: https://journals.ametsoc.org/doi/abs/10.1175/JAS-D-18-0369.1
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.00
Type: Journal Article

We investigate the role of a warm sea-surface temperature (SST) anomaly (hot-spot of typically 3 K to 5 K) on the aggregation of convection using cloud resolving simulations in a non-rotating framework. It is well known that SST gradients can spatially organize convection. Even with uniform SST, the spontaneous self-aggregation of convection is possible above a critical SST (here 295 K), arising mainly from radiative feedbacks. We investigate how a circular hot-spot helps organize convection, and how self-aggregation feedbacks modulate this organization. The hot-spot significantly accelerates aggregation, particularly for warmer/larger hot-spots, and extends the range of SSTs for which aggregation occurs, however at cold SST (290 K) the aggregated cluster disaggregates if we remove the hot-spot. Large convective instability over the hot-spot leads to stronger convection and generates a large-scale circulation which forces the subsidence drying outside the hot-spot. Indeed, convection over the hot-spot brings the atmosphere towards a warmer temperature. The warmer temperatures are imprinted over the whole domain by gravity waves and subsidence warming. The initial transient warming and concomitant subsidence drying suppress convection outside the hot-spot, thus driving the aggregation. The hot-spot induced large-scale circulation can enforce the aggregation even without radiative feedbacks for hot-spots sufficiently large/warm. The strength of the large-scale circulation, which defines the speed of aggregation, is a function of the hot-spot fractional area. At equilibrium, once the aggregation is well established, the moist convective region with upward mid-tropospheric motion, centered over the hot-spot, has an area surprisingly independent of the hot-spot size.

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